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What's it like, living on a boat?


LadyG

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  • Athy changed the title to What's it like, living on a boat?

It's like living in a metal womb with cooking facilities.

 

Alternatively, if you don't have great insulation or draught proofing, like living in a long bus shelter with a toilet.

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2 hours ago, rusty69 said:

Tell them, it depends on the type of boat. Living in a narrowboat is somewhat akin to living in a coffin.  

 

 

In my case it's a very cosy coffin, decorated in a modern style with  mod cons and with the advantage of travel at a leisurely pace, possibly moderate minor adventures more suited to the more mature.

 

 

 

 .

 

 

  • Greenie 1
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'Like being in a house, except for a wider choice of neighbours, little men wot do your garden, no junk mail, and a sense of achievement every day'.  Only afterwards might one explain the more physical efforts and sensory effects that go into making that achievememt occur....

  • Greenie 1
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A lot of people say they love their house but wish they could move it somewhere else, a boat solves that problem.

 

53 minutes ago, LadyG said:

In my case it's a very cosy coffin, decorated in a modern style with  mod cons and with the advantage of travel at a leisurely pace, possibly moderate minor adventures more suited to the more mature.

 

 

 

 .

 

 

Stop complaining then😜

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10 hours ago, MtB said:

Tell them it's freezing cold and damp, especially in winter. 

It's why the traditional boat buying season is the spring. Their executors selling off the boats of those who didn't collect enough nuts, berries and wood in the summer and autumn to make it through the winter.

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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Another stupid article on the subject. Sun readers will be coming to a waterway near you soon! 

 

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/19859191/we-save-1k-per-month-live-on-narrow-boat/?utm_source=native_share&utm_medium=sharebar_native&utm_campaign=sharebaramp

 

This bit sounds like journalistic BS.

"We also have a further saving of £2,000 as Kieran sold his car, as no extra transport is needed because our home now moves.”

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48 minutes ago, blackrose said:

Another stupid article on the subject. Sun readers will be coming to a waterway near you soon! 

 

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/19859191/we-save-1k-per-month-live-on-narrow-boat/?utm_source=native_share&utm_medium=sharebar_native&utm_campaign=sharebaramp

 

This bit sounds like journalistic BS.

"We also have a further saving of £2,000 as Kieran sold his car, as no extra transport is needed because our home now moves.”

To be fair the downsides are mentioned. Even the headline includes "we can’t stand up & hot water takes an hour to work".

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5 minutes ago, buccaneer66 said:

I imagine a boat is very similar to the 10x40ft tin tent (mobile home) that I lived in for 30 years, although I did have the advantage of mains electric.

How did you keep warm in the winter :D

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9 minutes ago, buccaneer66 said:

I had gas (Propane) heating, but the insulation was naff it quickly got cold

Plus lots of condensation from the burnt propane, according to my sister, who lived in one for several years. The insulation was so poor that thicker wallpaper made a noticeable difference!

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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14 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Plus lots of condensation from the burnt propane, according to my sister, who lived in one for several years. The insulation was so poor that thicker wallpaper made a noticeable difference!

Yes lots of condensation & I made a difference by using polystyrene wall liner uner the wall paper. The walls were about 3 inches thick so no better than a boat

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18 hours ago, LadyG said:

I was asked this question the other day, and sort of struggled to answer.

I came up with "what's it like living in a house?"


On a regular basis I get shouted “living the dream mate, good for you 👍


I just nod, it’s the easiest answer. 
 

“Better than paying the bills you have mate”, is sometimes my reply. 
 

 

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5 hours ago, buccaneer66 said:

I imagine a boat is very similar to the 10x40ft tin tent (mobile home) that I lived in for 30 years, although I did have the advantage of mains electric.

 

5 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

How did you keep warm in the winter :D

Spent a week in one once in the Lake District at Easter time. Absolutely freezing, but as we spent our waking hours walking or in the pub, and were mostly in bed when in the accommodation we managed. But I thought at the time that it fell well short of boat comfort.

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8 hours ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

 

 ...those who didn't collect enough nuts, berries and wood in the summer and autumn to make it through the winter.

 

 

I can't be the only one who now has a disturbing image of you gnawing on nuts through the dark winter evenings. 

Before this escalates and you start murdering speeding boaters to obtain a meat supply, I strongly suggest a visit to the local M+S food hall. Sainsbury's might work, at a push. 

It's not that I object to the murder of speeding boaters- in fact I consider that a service to humanity. 

But there may be some minor legal complications.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

No jury would convict. 😀

 

Would it were so, Ms Jen. Would it were so. 

I harboured ridiculously murderous thoughts about a speedy hire boater who almost spilled my coffee near Tattenahall last week, and I went to the trouble of questioning my legal team about the potential snags involved in dismembering the gentleman (and if possible the entire crew).  They were surprisingly negative. 

I moored at Nantwich this afternoon, and more than 70% of the boats that passed have been travelling at full cruising speed of 3-4 mph. They don't seem to care- most were Anglo-welsh hire boats, but still- they will have been told about slowing down past moored boats.

I briefly dallied with 3mph past some moored boats near Barbridge earlier, and was greeted with sombre looks from the moored boaters. The sense of outrage was almost palpable.  

I slowed to 2mph, and suddenly all was sunshine and loveliness from the moored boaters.

I totally understand that difference in people's reaction to my different speeds, but why cant all these speeding boaters also get it?

Are they immune to the disaffection that radiates so strongly from the boaters they pass? 

 

 

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