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Emissions-reducing device - 'EXO 1 by AtmosClear'


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Has anyone come across this or similar and have some informed thoughts on how feasible/useful it might be on a boat's diesel engine? It seems to be a unit that uses power from the engine to produce hydrogen and oxygen (by electrolysis) which it then adds through the air intake, apparently then improving combustion rates for reduced emissions...

 

ATMOS-CLEAR BROCHURE 19 JUN 2020 square (fliphtml5.com) / https://www.atmos-clear.com/

 

I'm not sure my budget would ever stretch to it (I heard it's circa £400 to get one installed or £200 for the unit as DIY fit, plus whatever the 'topping up' of its contents would later cost).

 

I do find it interesting though, we've not generally got very clean engines on the waterways and I wouldn't mind breathing in fewer nasties when stood near my/someone else's exhaust...

Edited by Ewan123
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Not really new. Something similar was demonstrated at the IWA show in 2008 I think, by Sabre Narrowboats on a boat called Sandoy. Met the owner not long after and it had been removed.

 

 

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Is this claiming to be a perpetual motion machine?  It takes energy to split water from the engine to produce H2 and O2 which you then burn to make energy?

 

Snake oil in my experience.  Like magnets on fuel lines.  Though Spitfires did have magnets on the petrol lines

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Having messed about with electrolysis of water as a teenager I would suggest that to produce a meaningful amount of hydrogen in water not doped with a conductor the current and thus the voltage would have to be so high the water would be likely to boil. I am with Tracy with this. If it worked the engine manufacturers would fit it as standard. Cheaper than EGR and Adblue.

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Dual fuel engines are common in big ships, but they just use gas and diesel.  A tiny quantity of diesel (tiny compared with the quantity that would be needed to produce the full engine output) is injected and burns,  acting as the ignition source for a large volume of weak gas/air mix.

The gas is usually CNG,  revaporised  LPG or LNG boil-off in gas carriers.

The benefit for the extra complexity is lowered  sulphur emissions and lowered consumption of low-sulphur fuel.

 

The device described by the OP will cost power, not provide extra, and you would need to redesign the combustion space to get any emissions benefit. In which case a low-emission pure diesel can  probably do a better job.

 

N

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3 hours ago, Chewbacka said:

To meet emissions regs truck makers have spent lots of money to find ways of reducing emissions including expensive precious metal catalysts, yet none have adopted this relatively cheap method- why might that be???

 

 

Puts me in mind of this cartoon making a similar point....

 

 

image.png.5e90ba8c06eb666ce12f079d54b516dd.png

  • Greenie 1
  • Haha 1
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Id say cat converters wouldnt work on very low output engines......the converter will simply run cold.........anyhoo,this was my experience .......the cat converters do make a good muffler though.

Edited by john.k
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Some years ago BP had an advertizing campaign about running their trucks on Green Diesel.........the idea was to emulsify 10% water into diesel fuel for trucks ........I was talking to mechanic at the product terminal where the road tankers were loaded,and he explained that fuel consumption of diesel was unchanged,however consumption of the water mix was 10% higher ,as might be expected.............the trick was the trucks had to be on the road 24/7 ,or the water would settle out in the injector pump and cause seizures............also notable ,the mix was only used in old trucks (Scanias) due for disposal .

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I think the old adage applies... if something seems too good to be true....

 

As an aside there was a Dr Who episode where cars all had an atmos device fitted, which later turned out to be part of an alien plot to take over the world by the sontarans. 

Edited by jonathanA
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Everyone seems to call CO2  gas pollution now........parroting green nonsense ..........anyhoo,back in the day pollution was reckoned to be unburnt hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen responsible for chemical smog.....................every one of the antique canal boat motors pouring out white smoke is the worst kind of pollution......the smoke is unburnt and partially oxidised hydrocarbons,and is  aldehydes, ketones ,and various aromatics.................all proven cancer  and emphysema causing agents.

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7 hours ago, john.k said:

Everyone seems to call CO2  gas pollution now........parroting green nonsense ..........anyhoo,back in the day pollution was reckoned to be unburnt hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen responsible for chemical smog.....................every one of the antique canal boat motors pouring out white smoke is the worst kind of pollution......the smoke is unburnt and partially oxidised hydrocarbons,and is  aldehydes, ketones ,and various aromatics.................all proven cancer  and emphysema causing agents.

CO2 is gaseous pollution. It's a 'greenhouse gas', the increasingly high atmospheric levels of which are driving climate change. No nonsense there and nothing new about it, this has been known for decades.

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