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Belfast’s first new navigation lock in over 250 years opening gates on Tuesday


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Belfast’s first new navigation lock in over 250 years opening gates on Tuesday - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

 

Regeneration: The new Lock Number 1 at Stranmillis on the River Lagan. Credit: Peter Morrison

 

The first navigation lock built in Belfast in more than 250 years will open its gates tomorrow.

A small number of boats will pass through the new Number One Lock at Stranmillis on the River Lagan at 11am.

It will be the first time this has happened since the Lagan Canal was closed to commercial traffic in the 1950s.

The lock is located underneath the new pedestrian and cycle bridge built as part of the Lagan Gateway scheme and opened last September.

Other initiatives falling under the scheme include the refurbishment of the existing weir, as well as landscaping and new path connections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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No doubt also providing convenient points to lock the gate beams to.  Not completly clear, but it looks like some are in place in the photo.

Edited by Ronaldo47
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1 hour ago, Ronaldo47 said:

No doubt also providing convenient points to lock the gate beams to.  Not completly clear, but it looks like some are in place in the photo.

 

 

Why would they need to do that??

 

 

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1 minute ago, George and Dragon said:

To stop the leprechauns stealing them?

 

Dammit you're right. I forgot about that persistent problem....

 

 

 

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I don't think those posts are the paddles they are just for locking the gates..I guess an anti vandal setup.

 

The paddles are in the gates but it's not that obvious how one winds them. Perhaps a little gear arrangement operated when standing on the walkways. Paddles lifted by screws with trapezoidal threads rather than rack and pinion. Windlass placed on spindle which protrudes vertically. 

 

Of course as those posts are to securely lock the gates then it is probably not a publicly operable lock and there must be vandal issues. Perhaps additional equipment is needed to operate the gate paddles thus making unauthorised use impossible. That would be quite a good anti vandal setup to have part of the actual mechanism kept elsewhere, for use by authorised operators only. 

 

Or a male windlass rather than a female one. 

 

 

Edited by magnetman
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They look like posts for securing the gates in a closed position ??  There are paddle bars I think in the centre of each of the four gates. The top ones appear not to leak at all ...

Edited by Scholar Gypsy
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The black boxes visible are probably locking devices to prevent access to the spindles. 

 

It's basically a well locked up lock with eight locks. 

 

Screw operated gate paddles. No ground paddles. 

Edited by magnetman
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3 hours ago, magnetman said:

I don't think those posts are the paddles they are just for locking the gates. I guess an anti vandal setup.

I hope that the balance beams do not fit exactly against the locking posts otherwise a warp in the beam in the wrong direction may mean the gates can not fully close.

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  • 2 months later...

Well I was over in Belfast the other week and I decided to visit this new lock, very nice it is too. It must have cost a fortune......a few million pounds I'd have thought and it looks like it is designed to be operated by lock keepers. I took some photos when I was there as I thought the forum might be interested.

 

Footbridge across the river to the lock. I particularly liked the artwork on the bridge piers.20220630_125140.jpg.f20015946c56b7668cc6f2fa9b49abc4.jpg

 

 

View of the lock from the footbridge. The lock landing is foreshortened in the pictures, it's plenty big enough. 

20220630_125009.jpg.d99fe2a24d6f7a2bc09146faa22b6950.jpg

 

 

View of the paddle arrangement on the gate. 

20220630_124816.jpg.b4e84af86c86c6b70b69624ffac8fcd5.jpg

 

 

Anti vandal beam locks. Space provided for beam to warp.

Screenshot_20220723-214651_Gallery.jpg.2c34ce5de688ccd203aebbb47baa997a.jpg

Edited by booke23
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1 hour ago, booke23 said:

View of the paddle arrangement on the gate. 

20220630_124816.jpg.b4e84af86c86c6b70b69624ffac8fcd5.jpg

Someone's already bent the paddle rod!

There's a good reason why on wide locks the bottom gate paddles are usually located close to the heel post.

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9 hours ago, David Mack said:

Someone's already bent the paddle rod!

 

No - put your 'keep it simple' head on.

 

The kink in the rod, hits the guide ring and 'stops', this stops you winding too far and lifting the slide out of its runners.

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