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Found this on Facebook 

 

"PSYCHOTHERAPY AND MENTAL HEALTH SKILLS COACHING SERVICE FOR BOAT DWELLERS LAUNCHES TODAY, FUNDED BY THE NATIONAL LOTTERY COMMUNITY FUND

Today, at the start of Mental Health Awareness Week, a Psychotherapy and Mental Health Skills Coaching Service for itinerant boat dwellers has been launched, supported by the NBTA and funded by the National Lottery Community Fund. The NBTA sends its heartfelt thanks to all the people who play the National Lottery every week for helping members of our community to access the mental health support that they need.

The Psychotherapy and Mental Health Skills Coaching Service will offer free of charge or low cost individual sessions for Bargee Travellers who are suffering from poor mental health. To contact the service please phone 0118 321 4128 or use the online contact form here https://www.bargee-traveller.org.uk/contacts/

A pool of mental health practitioners from the boat dwelling and wider Travelling communities will offer short term individual therapy and free skills coaching workshops for conditions including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and re-integration since Covid-19 restrictions; and will be able to help boat dwellers to access longer term health resources.

The service is led by Bargee Traveller Helen Brice, who says:
“Whilst boaters with a nomadic habit of life take to the waterways for a multitude of reasons, for some it is their first step up from homelessness. These members of our community are often psychologically vulnerable and live in relative poverty. Also, Bargee Travellers moor our homes in public spaces on the inland waterways, and thus are vulnerable to public observation and unsolicited comments, many of which are friendly, but a significant number are critical and unpleasant. In some areas we are subjected to verbal abuse and criminal attacks on our homes, which increases the stress on people who are not robust psychologically. During the Covid-19 lockdowns it became clear that there was a need for an accessible psychological service from psychotherapists who also understood boat life.”

She adds: “Whilst counselling and psychotherapy services are difficult to access for many people, the travelling boater community is particularly penalised by exclusion from registering with a GP due to their No Fixed Address status. This is prejudiced and unlawful, but it occurs frequently.

The impact of the Covid-19 restrictions, when everyone was encouraged to exercise outside, meant that Bargee Travellers’ homes were within inches of the numerous cyclists, joggers and walkers who took to the towpaths, and boat dwellers’ anxiety about the risk of contracting Covid-19 was completely overlooked.”

Tyler Hatwell, Psychotherapist, Travelling Showman and founder of Traveller Pride said:
“There are too many groups who are still excluded from accessing mental health support due to practical barriers as well as a lack of cultural understanding, so another service to combat this is vital and timely. Knowing that your background or way of life isn’t going to be a stumbling block, that you’ll be met as you are without misunderstanding or prejudice, can make all the difference.”

 

Presumably to deal with the stress caused by having to move a mile every two weeks.

 

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19 minutes ago, frangar said:

This rather sums up the Baton Twirlers and the sort of shite the lottery seems to want to support

 

Completely agree. 

 

The money would do more good given directly to CRT with a proviso that it is only to be used to maintain our historic waterways network.

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16 minutes ago, Goliath said:

Great idea 🙄funds given to support health care should instead be spent on the historic waterways network. 


 

Well done NBTA for promoting awareness to mental health issues and the problems some boaters have in accessing help.

My support continues

 

 

Isn't baton-twirling good for mental health ? 

 

Giving it a whirl

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The government are pumping an extra 2.3 billion into mental health services as a result of the massive increase in mental health issues resulting from the pandemic (and measures?).

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/mental-health-a-decade-of-change-in-just-2-years

 

At least people have a choice whether to buy lottery tickets or not.

 

I would imagine there are people on this forum who have suffered mental health issues and understand how much suffering is involved. I don't think I would have coped years ago if I hadn't decided to live on my boat.

 

 

Edited by Rambling Boater
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Alan,

I imagine it’d keep one physically fit too.

 

 

You and your pictures of the young girls twirling batons,

you do seem to have an endless collection. 🤓
 

Edited by Goliath
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Having had first hand experience of the total ineptitude of NHS psychiatrists and the harm their so called expert advice caused my partner I dont think any amount of money will help as the weak link is those delivering the face to face care.

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13 minutes ago, Goliath said:

Alan,

I imagine it’d keep one physically fit too.

 

 

You and your pictures of the young girls twirling batons,

you do seem to have an endless collection. 🤓
 

He has an annual endless collection of irrelevant trivia, and seems unable to stop posting on every thread, no matter how little he knows, and has given up boating on inland waters years ago.

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1 hour ago, Tam & Di said:

Presumably published 5 weeks ago on 1st April. 

 

Tab

So those who give greenies think that mental health issues are a laughing matter?

Shame on you.

It's the most difficult health problem of this generation, and professional help needs to be proactive. Those affected are not going to be cured with a few pills, they are going to suffer in silence. Society does not want to know, as evidenced above.

 

,  

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, LadyG said:

So those who give greenies think that mental health issues are a laughing matter?

Shame on you.

It's the most difficult health problem of this generation, and professional help needs to be proactive. Those affected are not going to be cured with a few pills, they are going to suffer in silence. Society does not want to know, as evidenced above.

 

,  

 

 

 

 

The press release is whats being discussed not the care in general which as I have stated in my opinion is dire at point of delivery....however there seems to be a growing movement to cry wolf with mental health and it being used as an excuse when convenient by those that want a "free ride"

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18 minutes ago, frangar said:

The press release is whats being discussed not the care in general which as I have stated in my opinion is dire at point of delivery....however there seems to be a growing movement to cry wolf with mental health and it being used as an excuse when convenient by those that want a "free ride"

Sadly there will always be some from all walks of life who will take unfair advantage of the system.

 

I agree that the 'cry wolf' factor does do a lot of damage to those who genuinely need help and support. Not just in mental health either.

 

As for a 'free ride', I'm not convinced anyone really gets the opportunity to have a free ride in life unless you're very fortunate to be born into a privileged family (or win the lottery!).

 

I'm sure many of us worked hard (and still work hard) to make a living.

 

 

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30 minutes ago, frangar said:

The press release is whats being discussed not the care in general which as I have stated in my opinion is dire at point of delivery....however there seems to be a growing movement to cry wolf with mental health and it being used as an excuse when convenient by those that want a "free ride"

 

I agree, I am well aware of the impact of mental health on the individuals who suffer from it and their family members. It is something I have experienced first hand.

 

I do wonder if some people with mental health issues who live on boats are suited to it though.

 

Living on a boat can be more stressful than living on land, there are just so many more things to worry about, most of which take more effort to sort out on a boat than they do in a house. It all depends on the personality and resilience of the person though.

 

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25 minutes ago, frangar said:

The press release is whats being discussed not the care in general which as I have stated in my opinion is dire at point of delivery....however there seems to be a growing movement to cry wolf with mental health and it being used as an excuse when convenient by those that want a "free ride"


there’ll always be someone getting a free ride on anything but coming from that angle in to any and every discussion sweeps aside the fact that there are people in need

 

 

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According to CaRT “Life is better by water” for your health and wellness. Obviously not for those living on it, I’m seeing more people getting stressed on the water because they have not realised how much it actually costs, with moorings, licence, upkeep and diesel.
 Younger people seam to be in this category, as they have spent their’s or Mums & Dads savings on the boat and realise life is not as Rosy living on it.

Younger people seam to get depressed more easier then the young of old.
  

Edited by PD1964
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I would say, just from my observations over the past 30 years there are quite a few people living on boats on the canal system with mental health issues who have a lot of problem getting help on the rear occasions they go looking for it. From what I understand people with no mental problems who CC often have problems getting any type of medical care.  

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10 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I would say, just from my observations over the past 30 years there are quite a few people living on boats on the canal system with mental health issues who have a lot of problem getting help on the rear occasions they go looking for it. From what I understand people with no mental problems who CC often have problems getting any type of medical care.  

It is difficult but possible. it’s something I’m going to have to think about as I  get older

I have a registered doctor and a postal address. both hundreds of miles away

When I need to go doctor, it’s not often, usually just a check up. I register temporary where ever I am and they send for my doctors notes.

It can be a slog to see anyone. But it varies place to place.

Goyt Health centre up by Whaley Bridge is fantastic. Sowerby Bridge not so good.

 

It must be really problematic for someone with no postal address and no registered doctor.

 

Dentists, I just have to pay full whack when ever I need.

I might put myself on a waiting list somewhere central.

 

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Not had a good experience of depression treatment here, I was prescribed rather addictive drugs when in reality I was having a completely human reaction to the kind of life events that many (if not all) people go through. Result was instead of coming to terms/dealing with stuff I just didn't give a poop and festered until I went cold turkey. Would have been no worse off getting drunk every day.

 

A bit of counselling (chargeable term for having a chat) would have been far better and it's only the relative expense of this that sees so many people prescribed drugs instead, so... hopefully this is a good thing.

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4 hours ago, frangar said:

This rather sums up the Baton Twirlers and the sort of shite the lottery seems to want to support

The Never Bloody Travel Anywhere members need mental health care, ever since they were told they might actualy have to move their boats :o

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15 minutes ago, Slow and Steady said:

Not had a good experience of depression treatment here, I was prescribed rather addictive drugs when in reality I was having a completely human reaction to the kind of life events that many (if not all) people go through. Result was instead of coming to terms/dealing with stuff I just didn't give a poop and festered until I went cold turkey. Would have been no worse off getting drunk every day.

 

A bit of counselling (chargeable term for having a chat) would have been far better and it's only the relative expense of this that sees so many people prescribed drugs instead, so... hopefully this is a good thing.

 

The other problem is that counselling takes real face-to-face time with skilled professionals who don't have enough hours in the day, writing a drug prescription is much quicker and often cheaper -- at least in the short term, which is all that seems to matter... 😞

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15 minutes ago, IanD said:

 

The other problem is that counselling takes real face-to-face time with skilled professionals who don't have enough hours in the day, writing a drug prescription is much quicker and often cheaper -- at least in the short term, which is all that seems to matter... 😞

I'd say that comes under the expense heading at the end of the day. Unqualified GPs prescribing brain warping drugs because the wait for a councillor is 6 months or more. It's the same fire fighting throughout the NHS though - you need something simple/cheap so have to wait because someone in dire straights obviously needs treatment first... so you have to wait until your simple condition has developed into an emergency requiring expensive treatment taking up 10x more time and expense. Surprise surprise the NHS is short of money. One of the consultant surgeons I "used" had 3, yes 3 that's no typo, planned operating days per year, the rest of his time was dealing with emergency admissions. That was ten years ago, I can only imagine with the delays due to Covid he doesn't have any planned surgery days now.

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7 minutes ago, Slow and Steady said:

I'd say that comes under the expense heading at the end of the day. Unqualified GPs prescribing brain warping drugs because the wait for a councillor is 6 months or more. It's the same fire fighting throughout the NHS though - you need something simple/cheap so have to wait because someone in dire straights obviously needs treatment first... so you have to wait until your simple condition has developed into an emergency requiring expensive treatment taking up 10x more time and expense. Surprise surprise the NHS is short of money. One of the consultant surgeons I "used" had 3, yes 3 that's no typo, planned operating days per year, the rest of his time was dealing with emergency admissions. That was ten years ago, I can only imagine with the delays due to Covid he doesn't have any planned surgery days now.

I did mean that saving money in the short term can prove more expensive in the long term, as in so many other areas (health/social care, Sure Start, PFI, prisoner rehab, selling off government buildings and leasing them back -- the list is endless).

 

But the UK government -- especially this one -- only cares about saving money *now* to make them look good, if they spend the money instead then by the time the benefit is apparent they probably won't be in power any more...

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