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These Tercoo things are supposed to be pretty good, I've never tried one but I'd be tempted.

 

Generally, from chatting up boat painters, if the paint is thick, scabblers and tercoo which batter/chip the paint off work well but if the paint is fairly thin and well bonded they struggle and a poly abrasive disc works better. It's a bit of a job however you approach it.

Edited by Slow and Steady
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16 hours ago, Hartlebury lad said:

I think if you catch the knocks and spots early, back to metal on those, and keep recoating all the rest every few years ? .Oddly, the roof doesnt bother me  nowhere near as much as the higher profile sides.. At least you get to see the results of your hard work whilst steering! 

 

That's what I do, go over the roof once every couple of years taking any rust spots back to bare metal, patch priming and painting. Two years ago at the start of covid I gave the whole roof two fresh coats of non-slip deck paint. The only thing I've neglected to do is fill in all the divots I've made with the grinder & wire wheels. I don't rate filler/primer as a primer and can't be bothered to use filler, so my roof Is a very uneven surface, but I don't really care about the appearance of my decks as long as they aren't rusty. Also, the non-slip deck paint I use covers a multitude of sins. You only really see the unevenness of my roof in the morning or evening sunshine.

 

If I ever was to take my entire roof back to bare steel I'd definitely put 3 coats of epoxy over it.

6 hours ago, Greg & Jax said:

 

Wouldn't that need the correct heads for steel or can the concrete heads do steel too?

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9 minutes ago, blackrose said:

Wouldn't that need the correct heads for steel or can the concrete heads do steel too?

 

Those designed for concrete would be better, especially if the roof was sand-coated. Harder wearing. 

 

 

Edited by Higgs
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Hi ,

I ruined a set of heads learning how to use it then I bought two extra sets and mixed an matched any I broke I had almost a full set left at the end .

There is a knack of how to use it but I didnt read instructions and just went for it 

A man thing hey ho .

The heads that are on it  in the picture are the one,s i used .

Edited by Greg & Jax
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I found.

A smooth sweeping action from left to right .

Push lightly and you do get the feel of how it works and how much pressure is needed .

To much pressure broke the spinning blades but they all come off and just replace individual one,s as and when needed. 

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13 hours ago, Greg & Jax said:

 

 

Looks to me as though if you left it running in one place for more than a few seconds, you'd end up with a nice neat new flue hole through your roof.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Higgs said:

 

Those designed for concrete would be better, especially if the roof was sand-coated. Harder wearing. 

 

 

 

Ok. I read something on the forum about the ones for hire from Brandon tool hire several years ago and I thought the consensus was that you needed the correct heads for steel surfaces but I could be wrong. I've never used one but I'd like to try.

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6 hours ago, blackrose said:

 

Ok. I read something on the forum about the ones for hire from Brandon tool hire several years ago and I thought the consensus was that you needed the correct heads for steel surfaces but I could be wrong. I've never used one but I'd like to try.

 

I should qualify what I wrote. In all the time I used a scabbler, in a professional capacity, I always had the star wheels on that were best for concrete. Over the years, I had many sand coated roofs to strip. Because of this, I never bothered to use any other star wheels. That scabbler setup was occasionally used to strip cabin sides and gunnels, without a problem. But the most useful and most frequently used tool was a Metabo orbital sander, 150mm, and 80 grit, for the aggressive preliminary work. But of course, not for sand coated surfaces. 

 

The scabbler would clear the roof on a 60' narrowboat in about 2hrs. Prior to having a scabbler handy, I might spend 3 to 4 days scraping a roof. I'm surprised my wrists are still ok. 

 

 

Edited by Higgs
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5 hours ago, Biggles said:

This is the photo today from the marina manager.

received_299870005501148.jpeg

 

Looks like most of the paint is already off!

 

I don't know if a scrabbler can remove rust back to bright steel? If not I'd just get going with angle grinder and wire wheels doing one square section at time back to steel, vacuuming, spirit wiping and painting on a couple of coats of epoxy as a primer or whatever single part primer you want to use. Don't attempt to prep a larger section in one go because by the time you've finished moisture will have got to the steel and it will start gingering.

 

Whatever primer, undercoats and topcoats you use, get the technical data sheets for the paint and pay attention to the maximum overcoating times for best interlayer adhesion. Generally for single part paints it's about 3 days. If you exceed these times then you have to key the previous painted surface before the next coat. That's another reason to work on smaller sections, at least until you come to the final topcoats.

Edited by blackrose
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6 hours ago, Biggles said:

This is the photo today from the marina manager.

received_299870005501148.jpeg

Having seen that, my earlier comments about not removing all paint is rubbish!  thats quite a job!!!!!!

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1 hour ago, robtheplod said:

Having seen that, my earlier comments about not removing all paint is rubbish!  thats quite a job!!!!!!

I did say in the OP  it has to come off.

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10 hours ago, Biggles said:

This is the photo today from the marina manager.

received_299870005501148.jpeg

 

 

I quite like that effect.

 

I'd give it a coat or two of matt varnish and leave it at that.

 

 

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The scabbler would not remove the rust on your roof only the paint  also the scabblers teeth don't touch the roof until the pressure is applied ., after seeing the pics there,s not a lot of paint left on .

Its a big roof to tackle though , I'd be definitely putting a few coats of vactan on it .

 

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A wire wheel on an angle grinder will get into the pits if you know what you're doing but a whole roof of that size is a lot of work. 

 

My dad used to run a small power tool company in the 70s and 80s supplying car body shops. One summer I went out on the road demonstrating a machine they called a suction blaster which was basically a small grit blaster/vacuum unit which recycled the grit. The blasting was done via a nozzle/brush on the end of a hose so the grit didn't escape. It was only for small areas but it was a good bit of kit. I sometimes wonder why they don't make bigger units like that for larger areas?

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3 minutes ago, robtheplod said:

True, but difficult to imagine... :)

 

you could keep the 'rat' look?

 

Its funny, I've seen live rats, i’ve seen dead rats, i’ve never seen a rusty one 🤔

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3 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

 

Its funny, I've seen live rats, i’ve seen dead rats, i’ve never seen a rusty one 🤔

ah this is from my time in the car world.... rat look cars look rough but have hidden and unexpected speed.... :)

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10 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Like this

 

image.png.29280789f7e54801896c19c2551ccdb8.png

Love it Brian, now try hiring one in France. Can't even get a compressor and pot type system quoted until I can tell them exactly when and how long I want it for.  Not even a simple day / week rate quote.  They do things very differently out there sometimes.

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On 24/04/2022 at 22:23, Hartlebury lad said:

I think if you catch the knocks and spots early, back to metal on those, and keep recoating all the rest every few years ? .Oddly, the roof doesnt bother me  nowhere near as much as the higher profile sides.. At least you get to see the results of your hard work whilst steering! 

The only place with rust bubbles in under the solar panels. Out of sight out of mind for a year I'm afraid.

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