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Does a mooring add value to narrowboat


pagan_sovereign
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Just a quick question to see how this works. we have been on our boat since October and we love it although after a few run ins with the ever changing marina management we have started to loosely plan moving out and living more on the wild side. Would leaving the marina and giving up our mooring depreciate the value of our boat?  

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Depends on your mooring provider, but many mooring agreements stipulate that the mooring is personal to the boat owner (not the boat), and cannot automatically be transferred to a new owner if the boat is sold. And there is no security of tenure on a mooring - you can be asked to leave with little notice. And anyway, the person buying your boat may not want to keep it at the same mooring. So most moorings don't add any significant value to the boat.

  • Greenie 2
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29 minutes ago, booke23 said:


Where is the mooring? Your profile says Bristol......If it's in Bath or Bristol then yes it could devalue the boat. 

 

I agree. Although few moorings have security of tenure a really nice mooring that the landlord is willing to transfer definitely raises the desirability of any given boat, and hence the value. 

 

So the answer to the question is as usual, 'it depends'. In this case it depends on how desirable the mooring is the OP might be giving up and whether the landlord is willing to transfer. Sometimes the LL demands a cut of the sale price to transfer (especially on the Thames) which further complicates the judgement to make.

  • Greenie 1
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Perhaps the best way of looking at it is the boat itself is worth the same, but if there's people desperate to get moorings on that site who can't get moorings on that site without buyng a boat already moored there, people might overpay for it to be able to get to the front of a queue for moorings. Maybe you had to do that yourself?

 

But most people looking for boats don't want your mooring, and prices are high for boats anyway.

 

 

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4 hours ago, enigmatic said:

But most people looking for boats don't want your mooring, and prices are high for boats anyway.

 

 

OTOH it only takes one potential buyer who want a mooring too, to find the overall deal of boat that comes with a nice mooring contract, well worth paying a bit (or a lot) more for. 

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13 hours ago, MtB said:

 

 

OTOH it only takes one potential buyer who want a mooring too, to find the overall deal of boat that comes with a nice mooring contract, well worth paying a bit (or a lot) more for. 

 

Exactly. Sometimes it even attracts buyers who didn’t even want a boat in the first place, but see it as a nice ‘cheap’ place to live given the location. 

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54 minutes ago, booke23 said:

 

Exactly. Sometimes it even attracts buyers who didn’t even want a boat in the first place, but see it as a nice ‘cheap’ place to live given the location. 

I once made enquiries about a boat for sale that I thought might be one I had known years ago. The vendor replied that he knew nothing about the boat or its history, having bought it for the mooring it was on, which he wanted for the boat he already owned.

Edited by David Mack
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