Jump to content

BMC 1500 winter starting?


Jak
 Share

Featured Posts

Hi all. I’ve read a lot of BMC1500 threads, but not really found what I think I need. 

 

Its an 80s boat and with the original BMC 1500. It’s a good engine. In that I’ve had her 5 years with no problems. But the motor has become very hard to start in cold weather. Never failed, but I’m cranking for a long time to get it going. Once she is running all is ok. The starter battery is on a mini solar panel FYI - so not flattened it yet. 
 

What should I be doing to improve cold weather starting?  Was wondering wether it’s worth new glow plugs. What else might I do?

 

thanks!

Jak. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had the same problem with my BMC 1.5 many years ago . I had read about glow plugs breaking off when trying to undo them which was why I kept putting the job off  but by following the advice of spraying WD40 or similar on them and then easing them out a quarter of a turn at a time then working them backwards and forwards they all came out with no problem . The drill bit  to clear the carbon is 11/64'' and I was amazed at the amount of carbon that came out . As Tony said don't use an electric drill ,I think I used Mole grips on the drill bit . You do need to make sure the drill bit goes right into the cylinder to get all the carbon out . I actually fitted new glow plugs and it transformed the starting . 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Troyboy said:

I had the same problem with my BMC 1.5 many years ago . I had read about glow plugs breaking off when trying to undo them which was why I kept putting the job off  but by following the advice of spraying WD40 or similar on them and then easing them out a quarter of a turn at a time then working them backwards and forwards they all came out with no problem . The drill bit  to clear the carbon is 11/64'' and I was amazed at the amount of carbon that came out . As Tony said don't use an electric drill ,I think I used Mole grips on the drill bit . You do need to make sure the drill bit goes right into the cylinder to get all the carbon out . I actually fitted new glow plugs and it transformed the starting . 

 

Actually the drill goes into the pre-combustion chamber rather than the cylinder but you are right, you must feel the drill "break through" the carbon.

 

I knew I had something else to say (the "worry the plug out" bit but was being called for dinner and forgot that bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for this. However I am sure I’ve read somewhere it may not be so easy to get the plugs out.  It there a risk, or a technique?  I’m familiar with removing car spark plugs so if it’s no more difficult than that then. I’m good. Anything else I need to know?
 

Jak. 

Actually I think the reply on WD40 and taking care answers my concern. As I too was concerned about breaking them off. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jak said:

Thanks for this. However I am sure I’ve read somewhere it may not be so easy to get the plugs out.  It there a risk, or a technique?  I’m familiar with removing car spark plugs so if it’s no more difficult than that then. I’m good. Anything else I need to know?
 

Jak. 

Actually I think the reply on WD40 and taking care answers my concern. As I too was concerned about breaking them off. Thanks!

WD 40 is not very good as a releasing fluid.

Plusgas is far better.

  • Greenie 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

and it is the tip that snaps off, not the threaded body. The carbon jambs the very thin tip in the head so you twist it off. Worrying the plug out is about the only way and even then they may snap.  If one does use a battery drill and the same sized bit that you use t take the carbon out. Keep greasing the bit, drill a little, withdraw the drill and wipe off the swarf, and repeat until the drill breaks through. We did this any number of times on the hire fleet without any problems but in theory the small remaining bit of tip could enter the cylinder and do damage but it never did for us. I doubt any penetrating fluid would have any effect but I would try to do it on a hot/warm engine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before you go drilling, do check that you are actually getting volts at the plugs when you are preheating, No power = no heat.

4 good plugs should draw about 42 amps cold, you should be able to see the battery volts drop when heating.

 

If you find that you cannot get any of the plugs out, try heating the air going into the engine inlet with a blow torch or hair drier or even a candle whilst cranking, it makes a huge difference to cold starting.

Avoid Eazy start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

If you can't get hold of PlusGas, petrol lighter fluid is almost as good. The point about see-sawing is that metal is not infinitely stiff, and by alternately applying pressure   clockwise and anticlockwise with the exposed end flooded with solvent, the portion at the exposed end can become freed while the rest is still stuck. Repeated to and fro-ing can pump liquid deeper along the thread and progressively free the stuck parts. Patience may be  required and fresh solvent applications to flush away the dirty solvent.

Edited by Ronaldo47
typos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Except it's not the thread that seizes up, it is the pin on the end of the thread. In this case I can't see any penetrating fluid would having any effect, but it will do no harm using it. Well apart from lighter fluid, that is the asat thing I would want evaporating into the bilge.

Edited by Tony Brooks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Ronaldo47 said:

 

If you can't get hold of PlusGas, petrol lighter fluid is almost as good. The point about see-sawing is that metal is not infinitely stiff, and by alternately applying pressure   clockwise and anticlockwise with the exposed end flooded with solvent, the portion at the exposed end can become freed while the rest is still stuck. Repeated to and fro-ing can pump liquid deeper along the thread and progressively free the stuck parts. Patience may be  required and fresh solvent applications to flush away the dirty solvent.

Gert the engine hot before trying to loosen heater plugs. Rocking them fractionally in and out is the best you can do. I have rarely broken the ends off doing it this way. If they do break it is not difficult to drill them out with an 11/64 drill, the bits that drop into the swirl chambers will do little harm in my experienced. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all. Great advice. I feel much happier about taking this on. As they are cheap enough, a new set is on its way from EBAY.  
 

Hope that I might help you out one day. My field is IT 👍

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I work in implementing complex IT business systems. This does not help in any way whatsoever for looking after an 80s narrowboat.  But I want to learn. I’m far too mean to pay someone else. And it feels like cheating. Thanks again. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.