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Two questions for liveaboard boaters


MichaelG

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14 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Yes, I knew it was awkward, I first thought about  Poles but they are only one diaspora. In some areas the shops are clearly signposted Latvian and other adjacent countries.

It depends where you are, which ethnic shops are sited where. They sometimes advertise European food as a bonus, but are not trying to fool us in to expectingTesco Express.

It's interesting to see what other people have as their staple diet. Lots of fresh herbs, big bundles of sage, coriander, mint, I think that was in a mini supermarket in Burnley. Near the Halal butcher. 

I think ethnic is better than ethnics. If I used the word ethnics at work I would at least have a talking to, probably a warning. I do agree that some of the smaller shops catering for their local communities do have some good offers on certain items compared to the major supermarkets, even if their product lines can be limited, as are are all smaller shops. 

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We often have Tesco deliveries to wherever we are moored. It's usually a pub, but sometimes somewhere such as a small industrial estate or retail park. There's a standing instruction for their driver to phone when 10 minutes away and I just tell them exactly where I will meet them. There is rarely a problem with short 'best before' dates by the way.

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Just now, Ianws said:

Which haggis leg is preferable. Do they move round the mountains clockwise or anticlockwise?

There are two sub species.  Lowland Haggis go anticlockwise but are very rare Highland Haggis are more common and go clockwise.  The downhill leg is most  developed and so has more meat.

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12 hours ago, Jerra said:

There are two sub species.  Lowland Haggis go anticlockwise but are very rare Highland Haggis are more common and go clockwise.  The downhill leg is most  developed and so has more meat.

Depends on whether the haggis definition of "meat" is the same as some fast food joints -- do minced eyeballs and kneecaps count or not?

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3 minutes ago, IanD said:

Depends on whether the haggis definition of "meat" is the same as some fast food joints -- do minced eyeballs and kneecaps count or not?

My Scots woodwork teacher at school used to describe Haggis as "a sheep's stomach stuffed with offal, to make it "offal nice""

 

Offal as far as I know is heart, liver, lungs, tongue etc so no eyeballs and no bone which there would be if kneecaps were included.

 

I doubt many modern Haggis are sheep's stomachs unless you are buying from a Scots local butcher.

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I love haggis but I actually prefer Grants tinned stuff to a "real" haggis in a sort of plastic casing.  I haven't seen a haggis bound by a sheeps stomach for donkeys years.  

This is the time of year however, when haggis go into hiding as they are widely used to celebrate Burns night (25th of january). 

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5 hours ago, haggis said:

I love haggis but I actually prefer Grants tinned stuff to a "real" haggis in a sort of plastic casing.  I haven't seen a haggis bound by a sheeps stomach for donkeys years.  

This is the time of year however, when haggis go into hiding as they are widely used to celebrate Burns night (25th of january). 

Small local butchers will have proper full size haggis for Burns Suppers, you just need something substantial the stab with your dirk. 

Thank goodness for the modern coatings, what a faff to prep one in the 1960's when I threw a dinner Burns Night dinner party. I can assure you that there is nothing worse than haggis soup! 

I prefer veggie haggis, but very rare south of the border. 

The success of the meal is to serve with mashed spuds and neeps, no other veg will do. 

 

Edited by LadyG
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10 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

The local butcher has some recently, I will give that a go I thought, all I can say is I am glad I bought a couple of backup pork chops

 

Haggis isn't too bad if you douse it in whisky before eating it.

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12 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

The local butcher has some recently, I will give that a go I thought, all I can say is I am glad I bought a couple of backup pork chops

 

But did you have it with mash and neeps? This strangely goes so well with it and as Jo says, makes all the difference.

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Just now, MtB said:

 

But did you have it with mash and neeps? This strangely goes so well with it and as Jo says, makes all the difference.

No, but if I'm honest I couldn't get past the smell

4 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

Haggis isn't too bad if you douse it in whisky before eating it.

Waste of good booze tbh, funny thing is I've had it before and enjoyed it

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2 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

No, but if I'm honest I couldn't get past the smell

 

That's were the Laphroaig comers in.

 

Or should have bought the vegetarian haggis!

 

:giggles:

Edited by MtB
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