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Daydream Believer (Long Post)


Mike1951
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Regarding stoves - have a think about a diesel one. I've had one on a long term liveaboard and am absolutely convinced by our experience. Not the cheapest at first look, but in reality they can work out cheaper than the multi fuel stoves to run. With the multifuel, if you are not a liveaboard with the fire on 24/7 for 4-5 months a year, loads of heat is generated and people often end up opening doors to cool down. Diesel is easy to control,convenient and clean, can be put on and turned off instantly, and at the lowest setting can be left on 24/7 and will keep the boat toasty.

As you are still at the steel stage, a dedicated fuel tank could be economically fitted. Not cheap, but Refleks stoves are great.

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20 hours ago, Mike Tee said:

Regarding stoves - have a think about a diesel one. I've had one on a long term liveaboard and am absolutely convinced by our experience. Not the cheapest at first look, but in reality they can work out cheaper than the multi fuel stoves to run. With the multifuel, if you are not a liveaboard with the fire on 24/7 for 4-5 months a year, loads of heat is generated and people often end up opening doors to cool down. Diesel is easy to control,convenient and clean, can be put on and turned off instantly, and at the lowest setting can be left on 24/7 and will keep the boat toasty.

As you are still at the steel stage, a dedicated fuel tank could be economically fitted. Not cheap, but Refleks stoves are great.

We have looked at diesel stoves, but my wife likes a cosy real fire and anyway we have Erbspracher diesel central heating 

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15 minutes ago, Mike1951 said:

We have looked at diesel stoves, but my wife likes a cosy real fire and anyway we have Erbspracher diesel central heating 

I’d agree. “Real stoves” are a bit messy and require attention … BUT they are nice! And also a good idea not to base all your heating on one fuel source.

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Another vote for fitting a real stove. What Nick said before about it probably ending up on the front LHS as a compromise is probably true. On the boat we had, we were able to get one in the lounge area about twelve feet back from the doors but it needed to be on the starboard side; the chimney got hooked by branches more than a few times. The layout of ours was virtually the same as OP except at 60' there was another eight feet of cabin space forward of the bow doors in the drawing. It had a small two seater sofa at 45 degrees to the end of the dinette and two small chairs, with the stove on the starboard side opposite them pretty much in the space available to the OP. However, as the flue needs to go up between the windows the OP is probably best putting it port side at the front for space saving and practicality of fitting.

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13 minutes ago, BEngo said:

Pressure jet boilers have a reputation. Not for nothing are they called by some Webastards or Neverspachers.

 

N

Indeed, though many of their problems seem to have disappeared since ultra-low-sulphur diesel came in.

 

(but I thought Webby and Ebbys weren't pressure-jet?)

 

There are much better diesel heating systems available but they're also a lot more expensive, so most boaters go with the cheap option and don't always install/use/maintain them properly, with predictable consequences...

Edited by IanD
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5 minutes ago, IanD said:

Indeed, though many of their problems seem to have disappeared since ultra-low-sulphur diesel came in.

 

(but I thought Webby and Ebbys weren't pressure-jet?)

 

There are much better diesel heating systems available but they're also a lot more expensive, so most boaters go with the cheap option and don't always install/use/maintain them properly, with predictable consequences...

Correct, Webasto/eberspacher/Mikuni are not pressure jet, they are evaporative.

Pretty sure a refleks isn’t pressure jet either, it’s drip feed.

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1 hour ago, Mike1951 said:

Primed and battened ready for spray foam tomorrow. We are going to inspect the foam on Tuesday and to meet the painter. What should I be looking for on the sprayfoam?

 2068870291_IMG_5641(1).jpg.479984cd33f21c4df8cb088d91fdb8f6.jpgIMG_5639.jpg.20cf97c58ae43eb714856304e5665a0f.jpgfoam

 

Check that the sprayfoam is an even thickness.

 

An easy way is to drive a nail through a piece of wood so that it protrudes by the specified thickness, say 50mm. Then press it into the sprayfoam at various places. If the nail prevents the wood from touching the sprayfoam then the sprayfoam isn't thick enough.

 

Take along a small can of expanding foam to repair the holes left by the nail to avoid later condensation points.

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12 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

Check that the sprayfoam is an even thickness.

 

An easy way is to drive a nail through a piece of wood so that it protrudes by the specified thickness, say 50mm. Then press it into the sprayfoam at various places. If the nail prevents the wood from touching the sprayfoam then the sprayfoam isn't thick enough.

 

Take along a small can of expanding foam to repair the holes left by the nail to avoid later condensation points.

Thanks. I have a carpenters' depth gauge I will take that along

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I would have thought a better way of doing most of it would be to take a short straight-edge (ruler) and put it across two adjacent battens. The foam should pretty much touch the back of the ruler everywhere. If it is proud of the battening it would need to be trimmed back a bit, but a large gap indicates foam too thin.

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Certainly check thickness as per NN, avoiding adding holes, but also check all angles.  It is easy to spray the outside of metal angles but harder to get it thoroughly inside.   There must be no holes left through to the steel.  I thought (in my then ignorance) that my boat was well sprayfoamed but later it took 12 large cans to fill the gaps more careful examination revealed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Popped into  Colecraft just before Christmas to inspect the sprayfoam - all satisfactory. In the few working days since then, they have managed to get the wiring in and make a good start on the lining.

 

IMG_5708.JPG

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