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BMC 1500 Wiring and Electrics.


TNLI
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Question: 

Just starting to sort out the engine loom wiring, BUT don't know the max number of Amps for the starter motor solenoid ?? I need that in order to select a 12V relay.

REPLY FROM TONY:

The problem is there are two coils in parallel in the solenoid and one, the high current one, is cut out the moment that actual motor is energised. This means you get  a very high current flow for a few seconds and then (from memory so probably not accurate) a steady  flow of perhaps six amps. I think a 40 amp automotive relay would be fine but I would use an old car type inertia starter solenoid.

I don't have a starter to hand so can't measure the resistance of the two windings and use that to calculate the current flow

 

 

Tony Brooks

www.TB-Training.co.uk

Mechanical & electrical support for ordinary boaters

 

  • Comment:
  • OK, so I will order a 100A max 12V relay, which is the same as I already have fitted for the glow plugs. The working load for those seems to be 4 times 10A per plug, so 40A. I always allow a 2 to 1 long life reliability factor for far Eastern, or even near Western 12V relays. So the next available size up from 80 Amps is 100A. Relays are an item that I always carry a spare for, so will need 2 more. 

 

The relay type I've found at a reasonable price of just under a tenner, is a Split Charge type, which I hope is OK, as I was just looking for a normal relay. This seems to be what that type is:

 

2. Split Charge Relay

This system uses a heavy duty version of a simple 'make and break' relay, the coil of which is energised by a signal that is only +12V when the engine is running (usually the charge signal wire from the alternator). When energised, this relay connects the two batteries together and disconnects them when the engine is turned off (it is important that the relay closes only once the engine is running so that the leisure battery is not connected to the starter during engine cranking, so a switched ignition signal should not be used). A heavy duty version is required so that it can handle the potentially large current that could be passed through it by the charging source.

 

So I'm thinking of earthing the lower coil connection, using the other central connection for the momentary on glow plug trigger switch, and the outside heavy cable connections for the battery feed via a 100A fuse, and the other fed to the glow plugs input wire.

 

Anything wrong with that idea ??

Relay.jpg

Edited by TNLI
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Personally I would take that 100 amps with a great big pinch of salt but as you are de-rating it anyway it should do fine. Electrically there is no difference between an "ordinary" relay and a split charge relay except an ordinary relay might not be build with a continuously rated coil and a split charge relay should be. The current ratings apply to the contacts and the connections related to it.

 

If you are fusing at 100 amps just make sure the relevant cables are rated at 100 amp or more.

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On 21/11/2021 at 17:14, Tony Brooks said:

Personally I would take that 100 amps with a great big pinch of salt but as you are de-rating it anyway it should do fine. Electrically there is no difference between an "ordinary" relay and a split charge relay except an ordinary relay might not be build with a continuously rated coil and a split charge relay should be. The current ratings apply to the contacts and the connections related to it.

 

If you are fusing at 100 amps just make sure the relevant cables are rated at 100 amp or more.

Great, so a split charge relay is a heavy duty one, which is what I will need for the main inverter which actually says 5000W on its ungrounded alloy box, but has no manufacturers or even a made in X label on it. 

 

My sister took a few pic's of my BMC instrument panel, although it's not finished, as I need to install a second alarm buzzer and a few additional switches and warning lights. All of the wood and some of the wire is recycled junk, or offcuts from a nearby rubbish bin. 

 

A bit peeved with the circuit diagram provided by the UK based seller, as he keeps saying it's a generic panel, so that means it's just bad luck that the wiring diagram is for a larger general purpose panel. 

 

Yes, I know the 2A fuses are not suitable for a salty boat, but they are only for the panels backlights and an overhead panel area red night light. If anyone wants to donate some Gold plated marine fuse holders, as sold by West Marine for around 10 bucks each, please let me know etc. I've removed one of the momentary on switches, (Stop solenoid), and replaced it with an ON-ON switch, a rare type that only Hamsters like myself tend to like. All it does, or rather should do is reduce the volume level of the 3 audio alarms, (High pitch continuous, intermittent high pitch and continuous very small bell), using a red warning lamp in series with their common earth.

 

The top row of switches will have a sealed 25A fuse to feed  engine related items, like the extractor fan, engine bay lights, aft cockpit area anchor flood type light, marine head light, (My panel will be inside well clear of any spray coming through the main hatch), and 2 engine bay bilge pumps. 

Photo0339.jpg

Photo0340.jpg

Edited by TNLI
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48 minutes ago, TNLI said:

Great, so a split charge relay is a heavy duty one, which is what I will need for the main inverter which actually says 5000W on its ungrounded alloy box, but has no manufacturers or even a made in X label on it. 

 

I don't understand this sentence. Inverters are not chargers unless they say so. I don't see where a split charge relay comes into an inverter circuit. A 5000W inverter should be considered to draw 500 amps on full load on a 12V battery plus start up surge. Most people would wire a large inverter: battery > high current fuse > master switch > inverter.

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3 hours ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

I don't understand this sentence. Inverters are not chargers unless they say so. I don't see where a split charge relay comes into an inverter circuit. A 5000W inverter should be considered to draw 500 amps on full load on a 12V battery plus start up surge. Most people would wire a large inverter: battery > high current fuse > master switch > inverter.

I can't find the part you quoted in my last post, and never mentioned chargers. 

 

Sorry, it was a bit of a joke, as the one I'm using is a typical Fleabay con job, the 5kW in the listing is some theoretical limit before it overheats so badly one of the 2 electrolytic capacitors near the final switch mode coil fails, (They are only rated at 250V which is rather close to the 230V output, so they often fail when overheated).  I have inspected the inside to see if it contains a thermal fuse, and alas it does not. The type of design involved chops the output voltage as it heats up, so it is probably only capable of producing around one third of the advertised max limit. When it fails, (I've fried one last year), they often dead short the supply. I've earthed the case, (The far Eastern manufacturer has no idea what doubled insulated means), and fitted a plug in German standard ELB, (Earth Leakage Breaker). 

 

I only use my inverter to power the Christmas tree lights and fore and aft HF antenna lights, (String of flashing lights around a temporary HF antenna), so it has a 20A 12V fuse in the feed wire at present. If I did win the Lotto, I would buy a real McCoy marine linear amp type sine wave inverter with built in CB's, an internal overheat fuse, (Easy to change once you have the case off), with 110 and 240V outputs that have auto reset digital RCD's, 12V charger option and a Gold coated set of contacts, even for the USB sockets. 

 

TB is correct to say a heavy duty inverter does need its own direct connection to the batteries, and I would not connect it to a battery selector unless it was rated at twice the max load. So battery, heavy duty fuse, heavy duty on/off selector, (Vetus battery switch type), obvious additional power on warning lamp, inverter, additional smoke detector just above unit, ELB/RCD units if you are nuts enough to buy a cheap unit that does not have them built in, 240V output fuses rated according to the device being powered, or wire involved.

  It's possible to switch the power on using a heavy duty relay linked to a remote switch, BUT a high quality 500A rated unit, (Double the max planned load), will cost far more than an ON/OFF battery switch, and finally you can't draw that heavy a load from many types of cheap house battery, as it might melt the plates. So you would need to check on what the battery bank is capable of in max continuous terms. In many cases you would need to use big truck start type battery, or pay a small fortune for an expensive German or US made gel cell that can do both deep cycle and heavy starts. A set of golf cart cells in series would also work in fresh water canals or rivers, but open cell batteries are a no go in salt water, due to the Chlorine gas risk. 

Edited by TNLI
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Ooops, just to correct one part of my first message, the warning lights and audio alarms part is wrong. The alarms are triggered when the sensor grounds the feed wire, so the ground wires can't be connected. It's the positive feed that needs an inline resistor of some type, and there will only be 2 audio alarms, not 3, as I don't regards failure of the alternator as requiring a fairly load audio alarm. I've not found a cheap 12V bell yet, and that warning circuit will be for the smoke detector wireless alarm. The plan for that involves a sensor in all the main watertight, (I hope) cabins or the water tightish engine bay, (With 2 bilge pumps in the engine bay area, one just under the engine and the second in a bowl connected by a small hose to a water collector box under the stuffing box. I installed a stuffing box tray system in my last yacht, and it allowed me to keep the bilges dry.

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Not entirely sure what all the switches and warning lights are for but hopefully the led warning lights in the middle don't include a charge light?  It'll need to pass far more current than an led can pass... Also be aware those inline fuse holders are junk.

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2 hours ago, Quattrodave said:

Not entirely sure what all the switches and warning lights are for but hopefully the led warning lights in the middle don't include a charge light?  It'll need to pass far more current than an led can pass... Also be aware those inline fuse holders are junk.

Yes, it's really tough to figure out because the circuit diagram is hopeless, it has 4 warning lights Ignition, water temp, oil pressure and unmarked one due to what might be a photo copying error! 

 Now the so called generic circuit diagram does have a few wiring colour code markings, so the water temp bulb is blue, the oil pressure is orange, the big red is the ignition light, and finally the unmarked bulb is, well that's a good question, BUT looking at the very Iffy circuit diagram I suspect it's the pre heat positive feed, so it would indicate that the glow plug relay should be on.

  The one I'm rather curious about is the big red bulb, which like, what I think is a glow plugs on warning, has only 2 wires indicated, and the chap who tries to answer questions about the instrument panels he sells, says is not an LED, but a simple 2W bulb. The green wire from it goes to what he called the exciter terminal of the alternator. So it might illuminate if the key is in the on position, but the alternator is not turning fast enough, but I will have to look up what happens to that terminal in voltage terms, as I'm more familiar with generators than alternators. 

 

  I'm still working on the panel as regards the switch panel and audio warnings, but it will be for engine related systems, like the extractor fan, engine bay lights, fuel pump feed, (ASAP priming pump, so should only be left on when priming is required), and the 2 engine bay and stuffing box auto bilge pumps, although I'm still umming and erring over the 5 functions, but it makes sense to stick with engine only systems. I will have to add a few more warning lights, like fuel priming pump on, and engine bilge water alarm light. 

 

My lifeboat project is being conducted on an absolute minimum cost basis, and I did say in my post that I'm fully aware of the poor performance of cheap inline car fuses, as I used them for non critical systems or items, like small lights. The strange thing is that I've used that type of El cheapo fuse holder before for all the lights in my last yacht, and none of them failed. I was given a small box full of them from the same chap as gave me the 5 switch panel, hence the odd stick on labels that I will remove sometime. One of the symbols is an upwards pointing finger, so I will have to ask him what that switch was intended for!

 

 

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6 hours ago, Quattrodave said:

Not entirely sure what all the switches and warning lights are for but hopefully the led warning lights in the middle don't include a charge light?  It'll need to pass far more current than an led can pass... Also be aware those inline fuse holders are junk.

 

If you have  a bilge pump under the engine best check an regulations your harbour authority have and certainly  don't try to get a BSS to go inland UNLESS you have a separate drip tray under the engine and above bilge level.

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5 hours ago, TNLI said:

Yes, it's really tough to figure out because the circuit diagram is hopeless, it has 4 warning lights Ignition, water temp, oil pressure and unmarked one due to what might be a photo copying error! 

 Now the so called generic circuit diagram does have a few wiring colour code markings, so the water temp bulb is blue, the oil pressure is orange, the big red is the ignition light, and finally the unmarked bulb is, well that's a good question, BUT looking at the very Iffy circuit diagram I suspect it's the pre heat positive feed, so it would indicate that the glow plug relay should be on.

  The one I'm rather curious about is the big red bulb, which like, what I think is a glow plugs on warning, has only 2 wires indicated, and the chap who tries to answer questions about the instrument panels he sells, says is not an LED, but a simple 2W bulb. The green wire from it goes to what he called the exciter terminal of the alternator. So it might illuminate if the key is in the on position, but the alternator is not turning fast enough, but I will have to look up what happens to that terminal in voltage terms, as I'm more familiar with generators than alternators. 

 Further proof if any was needed that you have not a clue what you are talking about or how to do the wiring.

 

An LED is useless as an "ignition" warning lamp without a shunt resistance. A 2 watt incandecent bulb will be much more suitable.

 

Do Liqui Moly not make a can of magic wiring that you could use?

Edited by Tracy D'arth
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The big red warning lamp. That type normally contains a 2.2W MES or MCB bulb and it is the exciter and no charge warning lamp. This is proven by one wire going to the alternator D+/exciter terminal of the alternator, The other wire comes from the ignition on/aux terminal of the "ignition" switch. On that panel,a s far as I can see, it is not a glow plug warning lamp because few boats seem to have one. The glow plugs should be wired in a way that prevents them being accidentality left energise (spring loaded switch position). If you want a glow plug warning lamp you many need to fit one. 

 

I have yet to see a warning lamp with more than two terminals and in all cases, apart from the charge warning lamp one is the negative (earth), be it via a sender switch, and the other a live feed so typically the ignition switch aux/on terminal but if you want a glow plug warning lamp from the glow plug side of the glow plug switch.

 

I know of no instrument circuits that need an inline (series) resistor, but the old 2V glow plug circuits did used a massive one for a for cylinder engine on 12v. That is not this engine. The only time I think you might need them would be for 12V warning lamps on a 24V system but then it is easer to change the bulbs or in the case of LEDs the LED.  However if an ordinary LED rather than an LED warning lamp is used such as you use in electronics then the LED will require a series resistor but that smacks of bad practice for an instrument panel to me. LED warning lamps have their own built in current limiting component so no series  resistor is needed.

 

There are plenty of 12V pietzo warning buzzers around for a very few pounds and when suitably mounted on a resonate board can be very loud. I would fit one per warning circuit to avoid the need for blocking diodes that would otherwise be needed to stop a warning on one circuit illuminating all the warning lamps. However if cost is the main factor diodes between the warning lamps and the buzzer neg terminal would be cheaper.

 

I am sure my electrical notes explain the engine and instrument wirirng and provide generic diagrams that you can modify. I have pointed this out to you before.

 

I must say I tend to agree with Tracy, in nearly every post you demonstrate you don't have a clue at the practical level.

 

Edited by Tony Brooks
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21 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

 Further proof if any was needed that you have not a clue what you are talking about or how to do the wiring.

 

An LED is useless as an "ignition" warning lamp without a shunt resistance. A 2 watt incandecent bulb will be much more suitable.

 

Do Liqui Moly not make a can of magic wiring that you could use?

If you try reading my post, it says that the so called ignition light is a 2W bulb. I've no idea what type it is, but it is definitely not an LED, and I agree it is probably just a normal incandescent bulb. No idea what you mean by an INCANDECENT bulb, so judging from your general attitude to forum replies, it might be something indecent in a can ??

 

Liqui Moly do make some magic sprays in a can!

 

OFF TOPIC

LM do not make a HG (Head Gasket) sealant for any type of engine. They do make an expensive radiator sealant, but that will not help seal a head gasket, unless it's tiny holes, or a minute crack that was detected by a positive Glycol test result and associated Potassium, (Might also show as Calcium and water), figures consistent with a tiny HG leak in a UOA, (Used Oil Analysis), result. I've also used BARS HG sealant to stop such leaks developing and it worked very well, BUT it can block up an old heat exchanger if you use too much in particular.

 

There is a company in the USA that does make a very effective HG sealant that often works as intended, even with a diesel, BUT it can't seal up a big crack or missing section.

  I don't recall their name, but if you ask in Bobs The Oil Guy forum in the additives section, some expert will know who they are, and if there are any other companies making a ceramic fine particle HG sealant. Those type of oily suspensions are expensive to manufacture, and a can of that type of magic potion will cost at least 100 quid from the manufacturer. There are bound to be some good copies on Fleabay, that probably contain something cheap, like a Bars HG sealant that might be good for tiny cracks or pin holes, if you keep the max RPM low after use.

  If you want to reply to this off topic comment, please do so on the page about the overheat problem that the poster thinks was caused by a failing HG. One reason I like BMC diesels is that they do not suffer from many HG failures, even when badly overheated. 

 

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20 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

The big red warning lamp. That type normally contains a 2.2W MES or MCB bulb and it is the exciter and no charge warning lamp. This is proven by one wire going to the alternator D+/exciter terminal of the alternator, The other wire comes from the ignition on/aux terminal of the "ignition" switch. On that panel,a s far as I can see, it is not a glow plug warning lamp because few boats seem to have one. The glow plugs should be wired in a way that prevents them being accidentality left energise (spring loaded switch position). If you want a glow plug warning lamp you many need to fit one. 

 

I have yet to see a warning lamp with more than two terminals and in all cases, apart from the charge warning lamp one is the negative (earth), be it via a sender switch, and the other a live feed so typically the ignition switch aux/on terminal but if you want a glow plug warning lamp from the glow plug side of the glow plug switch.

 

I know of no instrument circuits that need an inline (series) resistor, but the old 2V glow plug circuits did used a massive one for a for cylinder engine on 12v. That is not this engine. The only time I think you might need them would be for 12V warning lamps on a 24V system but then it is easer to change the bulbs or in the case of LEDs the LED.  However if an ordinary LED rather than an LED warning lamp is used such as you use in electronics then the LED will require a series resistor but that smacks of bad practice for an instrument panel to me. LED warning lamps have their own built in current limiting component so no series  resistor is needed.

 

There are plenty of 12V pietzo warning buzzers around for a very few pounds and when suitably mounted on a resonate board can be very loud. I would fit one per warning circuit to avoid the need for blocking diodes that would otherwise be needed to stop a warning on one circuit illuminating all the warning lamps. However if cost is the main factor diodes between the warning lamps and the buzzer neg terminal would be cheaper.

 

I am sure my electrical notes explain the engine and instrument wirirng and provide generic diagrams that you can modify. I have pointed this out to you before.

 

I must say I tend to agree with Tracy, in nearly every post you demonstrate you don't have a clue at the practical level.

 

 

Thanks for the reply and you have not read or understood my post, as I did point out which of the LED warning lights is probably for the glow plug relay, and it's definitely not the big red bulb. Also if you try and read my posts, you will notice that I have already fitted one pizza warning buzzer, and will be fitting another intermittent type next to it. The extra on-on switch was going to be used for a volume reduction resistor in the form of a cheap warning light, although I don't have any spare diodes at present, but they are very cheap. If I can find a cheap source of electronic auto reset fuses, I might consider buying one.

 

  The circuit diagram provided with the generic panel is very poor and uses non standard symbols, so like you I'm puzzled by some of them. But like most maritime mobile amateur radio, (Hamsters), operators, I do have a rough idea how to read a correct circuit diagram and build a transceiver just using a circuit diagram, (HF only, as I don't like using acid baths to make printed circuit boards), although it is now cheaper to buy a kit than to try buying all the parts. 

 

  OFF TOPIC: If there are any HF Hamsters, (I don't have a 2m or UHF rig at present to try a moon bounce contact, but might get one if I retire to the Norfolk Broads etc), let me know sometime, or join in the Parkstone Hamsters Zoom meet on Friday evenings.

 

PS: This is a clip of me not re building a old sunken lifeboat, (Central coffin berth, under the rescue deck), about a year ago, Cheers to all the impoverished DIY boaters!

IMG_20200103_154813262-ANIMATION.gif

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You are right, I have great difficulty understanding your posts, unlike most others on this forum. In my view they tend to ramble, use slang or non-technical terms and far far from concise and to the point. You also seem to divert many posts to what seems to be your pet hobby horses, many of which so not seem to be born out by experience. This just makes them even more confusing.

 

I am still wondering what your video and the talk of some form of radio communications adds to the topic as posed by the OP. I would suggest that you stop resurrecting zombie topics and thereby adding confusion to other peoples topic and start your own  with a clearly defined question or statement/view point, just like most other members do..

Edited by Tony Brooks
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5 hours ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

If you have  a bilge pump under the engine best check an regulations your harbour authority have and certainly  don't try to get a BSS to go inland UNLESS you have a separate drip tray under the engine and above bilge level.

Thanks, I was looking out for a stainless steel oven drip pan. I've got one but it's too small, as I found it in a small 2 ring & grill oven. I really need to find a large oven SS drip tray. 

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20 minutes ago, TNLI said:

Thanks, I was looking out for a stainless steel oven drip pan. I've got one but it's too small, as I found it in a small 2 ring & grill oven. I really need to find a large oven SS drip tray. 

 

I doubt that you will find an oven tray that will do the job. It needs to go from just in front of the engine right back to the box shaft coupling. It should also span the full width between the engine beds. Have a Google for galvanised drip or gravel trays and if you are really lucky you might find a second hand one from local adds.

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8 hours ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

I doubt that you will find an oven tray that will do the job. It needs to go from just in front of the engine right back to the box shaft coupling. It should also span the full width between the engine beds. Have a Google for galvanised drip or gravel trays and if you are really lucky you might find a second hand one from local adds.

 

Most of the canal boats I've seen pictures of in this forum do not have a drip tray that covers the entire area from one engine bed to the other and from the front of the engine to the gearbox prop shaft coupling. Some of them had oil absorbing mats.

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TB start of first reply:

The big red warning lamp. That type normally contains a 2.2W MES or MCB bulb and it is the exciter and no charge warning lamp. This is proven by one wire going to the alternator D+/exciter terminal of the alternator, The other wire comes from the ignition on/aux terminal of the "ignition" switch. On that panel,a s far as I can see, it is not a glow plug warning lamp because few.

 

Why do you think it's an MCB (Miniature Circuit Breaker) ?? I did look in RS for a similar MES, but no luck.

 

No luck finding the exact same bulb in RS:

MES Bulbs | RS Components (rs-online.com)

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Dude, what are you on about, your posts make no sense.  I wonder if your taking the piss some how? Anyway if you want a simple answer please ask a simple question. 

 

Any hoe, going back to one of your previous posts, the wiring for any BMC engine is about the simplest wiring of any engine, if your struggling with the circuit diagram draw it out and ask. One last point, if you want your work/electrics to last, build it the best you can to the best of your ability with decent components. If not you'll be spending more and wasting lots of time fault finding and chasing problems.

Edited by Quattrodave
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7 hours ago, TNLI said:

TB start of first reply:

The big red warning lamp. That type normally contains a 2.2W MES or MCB bulb and it is the exciter and no charge warning lamp. This is proven by one wire going to the alternator D+/exciter terminal of the alternator, The other wire comes from the ignition on/aux terminal of the "ignition" switch. On that panel,a s far as I can see, it is not a glow plug warning lamp because few.

 

Why do you think it's an MCB (Miniature Circuit Breaker) ?? I did look in RS for a similar MES, but no luck.

 

No luck finding the exact same bulb in RS:

MES Bulbs | RS Components (rs-online.com)

 

Miss type, should be MCC not MCB.  If you don't know that MES stands for miniature Edison Screw and MCC stands for Miniature centre contact then that is your problem. In the UK they may be referred to by a three digit number, starting with 9 I think but remembering the cap size is easier I find. Anyway if it is a half decent panel there will be an bulb in the fitting already.

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19 hours ago, TNLI said:

Thanks, I was looking out for a stainless steel oven drip pan. I've got one but it's too small, as I found it in a small 2 ring & grill oven. I really need to find a large oven SS drip tray. 

For a boat in a similar situation, I made a catch pan folded up from 0.5mm thick aluminium sheet. This was thin enough to fold up the corners by hand to get a leak proof tray and yet also hold its shape once folded. It was also flexible enough to force under an in-situ engine. The boat has passed a couple of BSS exams with this. Al sheet is not expensive. The tray should have enough volume to hold the entire oil content of the engine, should it dump all its oil from a broken pipe, or whatever.

Jen

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47 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

For a boat in a similar situation, I made a catch pan folded up from 0.5mm thick aluminium sheet. This was thin enough to fold up the corners by hand to get a leak proof tray and yet also hold its shape once folded. It was also flexible enough to force under an in-situ engine. The boat has passed a couple of BSS exams with this. Al sheet is not expensive. The tray should have enough volume to hold the entire oil content of the engine, should it dump all its oil from a broken pipe, or whatever.

Jen

Thanks, I was thinking of that, as I have some thin alloy panels that I found in one of the lockers after the boat was salvaged, 

 

OFF TOPIC A BIT

ASAP are having a 10% off sale and their Bosch spin on oil filters are cheap, part no 0 451 103 033, BUT if you find them on Fleabay and they are not boxed with a plastic cap over the filter, odds on they are another copy. If you check inside the filter, the media pleats should all be neat and straight. I think genuine Mahle made in Germany oil filters have zig zag pleats, if you use them. 

Fleabay and Amazingzone are both awash with copied everything. The consequence of using bad oil filters can be worse than using rejected Bulgarian base stock 15w40 in nice plastic can, (No additives as they are not cheap). If your BMC has been converted from a canister oil filter to a spin on one, it should have, (Don't forget that TB is the BMC expert), an oil pressure relief valve inside the block someplace. If it does not and was a late model, (Mine was used for the Ark's motor), spin on filter version, using a dodgy copied oil filter can be real fun, cos when you try and start it when it is seriously cold, the oil filters internal pressure relief valve should open for a short while bypassing the media part and preventing the oil pressure surging to a real high figure. If that valve is not included, it can split the filter open, or blow out the oil seal. I'm not an expert on oil pressure relief valves, so I might be slightly off about how that oil filter valve works.

 

PS: Hope Santa can make you a nice new face for Christmas!

Edited by TNLI
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2 hours ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

Miss type, should be MCC not MCB.  If you don't know that MES stands for miniature Edison Screw and MCC stands for Miniature centre contact then that is your problem. In the UK they may be referred to by a three digit number, starting with 9 I think but remembering the cap size is easier I find. Anyway if it is a half decent panel there will be an bulb in the fitting already.

Thanks, I did not realise that it was not a sealed unit, but a bulb holder.

 

I agree it's a nice panel and far cheaper than buying all the component parts separately, the 3 gauge instrument cluster costs just over 30 quid and includes a pair of senders that appears to be the same as those on the engine. It's not just the poor so called generic circuit diagram that is irritating to use, it's the lack of labels and in the case of the big red bulb, the need for a description of what it is and how it was wired. The unit was supplied with a big 12 pin plug, BUT as I need to intercept and change some of those wires, I binned. I never ever use plug and sockets unless they can't be avoided, as cheap non Gold plated ones corrode in a salty air very quickly, so I just either solder the wires, or use a new set of solder free sealed connectors that you just heat up. The low temp solder inside them melts, then the shrink wrap parts contracts sealing the twisted join in the wires. I then use normal shrink wrap to double insulate the join.

 

Heat Shrink Solder Sleeves Electrical wire terminals non crimp connector Blue | eBay

 

PS: Just an example as it's from a 90% only seller!

 

Looks better and same type as I use:

 

300 Solder Seal Sleeve Heat Shrink Butt Wire Waterproof Connectors Terminals Set | eBay

Edited by TNLI
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I do not think the connectors in your first link to are non crimp for the conductor part. The words say normal crimp and the heat shrink. I very much doubt heat shrink would stand the temperature needed to melt even low melt point solder and bond it to the conductors. These will require a  decent crimping tool to make a good joint

 

A far as the second link is concerned I  would have questions about what heat source is needed to get a good joint and the length of solder looks very short to me so it could be all too easy to only solder to one wire. If the two I would probably prefer the fist except I would do a spliced solder joint plus heat shrink tube, adhesive as it is to be a sea boat.

 

Just be aware things may not ba as easy as the vendors suggest so maybe buy a few and practice.

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