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A Kingston man who repeatedly refused to move his two moored river boats has been convicted, the Environment Agency (EA) revealed today (October 11).


Alan de Enfield

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30 minutes ago, Midnight said:

Actually if you read my post without being blinkered by your emotions you would understand that I don't support the local farmers hunt but am prepared to accept it's part of the village life as the alternative is the likelyhood that all the foxes in the valley and local moorland will be gassed. To be clear not by me. 

I read your posts.  Nothing to do with emotions, you were making statements based on a fallacy about the geographic distribution of foxes, so I corrected you. 

 

I completely grasp your position, but I don't agree with it.  Mainly because you are still clinging to it as a binary choice.  Which it isn't.  There are numerous alternatives, of which hunting with dogs AND gassing would be two of the most heinous. 

 

The first thing you could do would be to start a campaign in your village to end both trail hunting (which kills foxes illegally) and gassing.  You might be surprised how much support you get.  Takes courage though.

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Funny innit. There is some sort of misplaced expression of (usually) masculinity going on with huntin' n' shootin' . Nobody gets off on shooting sheep or cows even if they taste better than bears or buffalo, humans tend to hunt other hunters, foxes, lions, otters (New forest otter hounds still existed when I was young) , that macho alpha male Hemingway used to write books about fishing for marlin, sailfish etc. There is something big gun, big horse, big car little willy about blood sports and stuff. Me? I quite like kittens and puppies - not shooting them you understand - just being nice to them. Says a lot I reckon...

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Some reported earlier,

Kingston man convicted for refusing to move house boats | Surrey Comet

 

Alistair Trotman, from Kingston, ignored warnings from the Environment Agency that he was reportedly flouting bylaws designed to keep the river safe and clear.

The EA said he broke limits on the time a boat can be moored in place at or near a lock.

The 55-year-old, who represented himself and has consistently denied he did anything wrong, rented out the barges Kupe and Rhythm of River as permanent and temporary accommodation.

 

The EA said that Trotman placed the former commercial barges "end-to-end in an Environment Agency lay-by at Molesey, one of the busiest locks on the Thames, between October 2018 and the following March".

I can now see this has a lot to do with foxhunting, Etc.

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32 minutes ago, frangar said:

Yet you choose to participate in the discussion here….why was that?? 

Because it's here, so one sees it? And it's a discussion forum. I don't bother with the politics bit much because it's mostly full of stupidity and circular arguments. The pub does come up on VNC.

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15 minutes ago, MIKE P said:

 

Alistair Trotman, from Kingston, ignored warnings from the Environment Agency...

I can now see this has a lot to do with foxhunting, Etc.

Thread got sidetracked by one of the notorious stirrers. Thread drift is one of the charms of this forum. Always worth checking back occasionally to find out what the OP was!

Edited by Arthur Marshall
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3 hours ago, Bewildered said:

 

Mountain climbing, BASE jumping, tightrope walking, parkour, to name but a few

I have done quite a bit of that both here and abroad, I can't say I was ever sacred for my life.  My youngest daughter does parkour and doesn't seem to find any of it scary let alone sacred for her life.

Edited by Jerra
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7 minutes ago, Jerra said:

I have done quite a bit of that both here and abroad, I can't say I was ever sacred for my life.  My youngest daughter does parkour and doesn't seem to find any of it scary let alone sacred for her life.

 

My 'best mate' (since school days) and I were regular climbers. It is not a case of being scared but of being aware of the risks and either accepting them and keeping climbing, or not accepting the risks, and giving up.

 

He died, in Wales, doing what we both enjoyed, I gave it up.

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2 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Thread got sidetracked by one of the notorious stirrers. Thread drift is one of the charms of this forum. Always worth checking back occasionally to find out what the OP was!

Quite right, I like this forum for what it is.

Which is the best, Pump out or Cassette. or should this be on a thread discussing Angling?

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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

My 'best mate' (since school days) and I were regular climbers. It is not a case of being scared but of being aware of the risks and either accepting them and keeping climbing, or not accepting the risks, and giving up.

 

He died, in Wales, doing what we both enjoyed, I gave it up.

Exactly, you and he would not be having the feelings you would have had if being hunted knowing death would result if/when you were caught.

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46 minutes ago, MIKE P said:

Quite right, I like this forum for what it is.

Which is the best, Pump out or Cassette. or should this be on a thread discussing Angling?

 

Angling is not as posited a few posts previously, analogous to fox hunting. The angler does not set out to catch and kill the fish, rather to catch it, admire it, weigh it then bung it back unharmed. 

 

A few people who 'look a bit foreign' kill them but that is because they set out to catch them them for food. Which sort of makes it ok, unless one is a vegetablist. 

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3 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

Angling is not as posited a few posts previously, analogous to fox hunting. The angler does not set out to catch and kill the fish, rather to catch it, admire it, weigh it then bung it back unharmed. 

 

A few people who 'look a bit foreign' kill them but that is because they set out to catch them them for food. Which sort of makes it ok, unless one is a vegetablist. 

I have difficulty in believing that a hook through the mouth classes as unharmed.

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1 hour ago, MtB said:

 

Angling is not as posited a few posts previously, analogous to fox hunting. The angler does not set out to catch and kill the fish, rather to catch it, admire it, weigh it then bung it back unharmed. 

 

A few people who 'look a bit foreign' kill them but that is because they set out to catch them them for food. Which sort of makes it ok, unless one is a vegetablist. 

Ah, but the huntsman only wants a good ride - his prime purpose, as we have seen, is not to kill foxes as that can be done more efficiently in other ways. He does it for the sport, same as the dangler.

Unlike the bloke back at the Thames,  who did it for money. I suspect there's more thrill in that.

Althhough I am not entirely sure MtB is taking this seriously, unlike me.

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22 hours ago, Jerra said:

I have done quite a bit of that both here and abroad, I can't say I was ever sacred for my life.  My youngest daughter does parkour and doesn't seem to find any of it scary let alone sacred for her life.

Yet people die doing all theses things and many other extreme sports, the greater the risk the greater the thrill

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10 minutes ago, Bewildered said:

Yet people die doing all theses things and many other extreme sports, the greater the risk the greater the thrill

..... but they dont expect to, and they take the risk willingly. People also die crossing the road, and driving their car, but they dont expect to, and take the risk willingly.

 

You seem to be suggesting that the fox hears the hunt, immediately relishing the fact that it's going to have a bit of an adrenalin rush, followed by being ripped to bits, during which it dies.

 

What a ridiculous way of trying to justify what is no more than a barbaric pursuit, ( I couldn't bring myself to call it a sport :( )

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34 minutes ago, Richard10002 said:

..... but they dont expect to, and they take the risk willingly. People also die crossing the road, and driving their car, but they dont expect to, and take the risk willingly.

 

You seem to be suggesting that the fox hears the hunt, immediately relishing the fact that it's going to have a bit of an adrenalin rush, followed by being ripped to bits, during which it dies.

 

What a ridiculous way of trying to justify what is no more than a barbaric pursuit, ( I couldn't bring myself to call it a sport :( )

I’m not trying to justify anything, I also think the whole concept of hunting for fun is barbaric. I was trying to make a point that hunting with dogs is now illegal yet a farmer is well within his rights to shoot foxes that threaten his livestock. A rifle would at least be a clean kill but a farmer is more likely to use a shotgun and the slow agonising death from septicaemia would be worse.

A fox would of course choose neither but unfortunately they are seen as pests and have to be dealt with. 

As to the point of if a fox enjoys a chase or not, who can really say? They certainly don’t like being caught but can anyone really say for certain that they don’t enjoy the chase. Is this just a case of anthropomorphising how we think onto the fox.

I was merely pointing out that humans risk their lives for the thrill of the adrenaline rush. How to we know other animals don’t enjoy a good adrenaline rush, even if it isn’t their choice?

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