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Neil2

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10 hours ago, Ange said:

Knowing that my health was going to deteriorate made keeping the house a no brainer for us but I'd recommend it for anyone. We could have sold our house and had the funds to buy a much posher boat but we knew we needed to make sure we had the longer term taken care of.

 

I know many new posters on here dismiss keeping their house and insist they need the capital for the boat purchase, I'd say buy a much cheaper boat than your dream boat and downsize that house of yours to release the capital without stepping off the property ladder.

If is also important to take a view on your age at the time you decide to move back into bricks and mortar. There is an age above which you cannot get a mortgage so you would need to ensure that the residual value in the boat is enough to buy a house - somewhat unlikely I guess.

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I did most of my boating when I was in my twenties, which was fortunate in that I had to have a hip replacement when I was thirty-two. Since then I have spent much time researching the history of waterways, particularly looking at those in the former communist countries of Europe, though I did get to see the Grand Canal in China on several occasions. I don't regret giving up my old wooden short boat, though I do miss meeting the declining number of old canal men and women who were still around in the 1970s. Canals had to develop into leisure to survive, but I am glad I was able to see them when they were still comparatively unchanged.

 

The photo shows Charlie Atkins keeping an eye on my boat at Preston Brook.

Pluto 499, Preston Brook with Mendip.jpg

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2 hours ago, Naughty Cal said:

We got chatting to an older couple who lived in a converted Mercedes Sprinter panel van and have done for the last 10 years or so the last time we went to Saltfleet Haven. They are usually off on their travels around europe and beyond but due to Covid had spent 18 months or so in the UK. They had sold up everything to buy and convert this van and all of their belongings, everything they owned was in it.

 

Their funds are now starting to run out, their van is being scraped through every MOT by the skin of it's teeth and was ready for the scrap yard years ago and their health is now starting to fail them, they are really starting to suffer during the winter months due to their living conditions.

 

They are completely stuck. When the van does fail they have absolutely no idea what they will do.

 

We found it quite sad talking to them as their dream had turned out to be a living nightmare for them with no obvious way to improve their situation.

 

And If they are as worried and find life that difficult it may well be that in a humane society that looks after individuals, rather than pressure groups, they would be allowed to get the pills so, at their choice of time, could slip away peacefully.

 

I know that my only sensible choice will probably be to commit suicide, but in doing so would be likely to traumatise a number of innocent people and that is despite the latest care and medical "improvements".

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2 hours ago, Naughty Cal said:

We got chatting to an older couple who lived in a converted Mercedes Sprinter panel van and have done for the last 10 years or so the last time we went to Saltfleet Haven. They are usually off on their travels around europe and beyond but due to Covid had spent 18 months or so in the UK. They had sold up everything to buy and convert this van and all of their belongings, everything they owned was in it.

 

Their funds are now starting to run out, their van is being scraped through every MOT by the skin of it's teeth and was ready for the scrap yard years ago and their health is now starting to fail them, they are really starting to suffer during the winter months due to their living conditions.

 

They are completely stuck. When the van does fail they have absolutely no idea what they will do.

 

We found it quite sad talking to them as their dream had turned out to be a living nightmare for them with no obvious way to improve their situation.

Selling the house and using all the proceeds to buy a narrow boat to live on may be a rash decision, but buying a campervan (with no backup plan) seems just plain foolish. A nb in reasonable condition is more or less guaranteed to last another 25+ years with a moderate level of maintenance. The same cannot be said of a road vehicle.

Edited by David Mack
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1 minute ago, David Mack said:

 

Selling the house and using all the proceeds to buy a narrow boat to live on may be a rash decision, but buying a campervan (with no backup plan) seems just plain foolish. A nb in reasonable condition is more or less guaranteed to last another 25+ years with a moderate level of maintenance. The same cannot be said of a road vehicle.

I absolutely agree. But you would be surprised how many do it or are doing it.

 

Crazy.

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7 hours ago, booke23 said:

This is true, but the big difference is that they will be faced with paying monthly rent for the rest of their lives, whereas if they had stayed on the property ladder in some way they would be rent and mortgage free.

 

I know plenty of retired people do rent, but where you have the choice to stay on the property ladder I'd say you should do so. Renting in retirement is a serious financial burden. 

Horses for courses, methinks. I see pros and cons on either side; if you can afford the outgoings for the property you want it's a question of personal preference. 

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6 hours ago, Naughty Cal said:

I absolutely agree. But you would be surprised how many do it or are doing it.

 

Crazy.

Yes it is crazy. 

Unfortunately some people cannot see or plan beyond the end of next week.

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15 hours ago, George and Dragon said:

Horses for courses, methinks. I see pros and cons on either side; if you can afford the outgoings for the property you want it's a question of personal preference. 

Rents are only going one way, and that isn't in favour of renters!

 

Renting a property in retirement can only be a bigger financial burden than owning a property outright. Yes there is maintenance on an owned property but that isn't going to add up to the same as renting, unless a property has been really neglected in the past.

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1 hour ago, Naughty Cal said:

Rents are only going one way, and that isn't in favour of renters!

 

Renting a property in retirement can only be a bigger financial burden than owning a property outright. Yes there is maintenance on an owned property but that isn't going to add up to the same as renting, unless a property has been really neglected in the past.

Sorry to say that this is all too true. Having just moved off living aboard for the last over 30 years we had every intention of renting and didnt at all want to own a property. But after looking at the increases and the fact that my missus could be moved on at a whim later on for instance and the way agents treat you as a third class citizen we relunctantly bought again. I have spent my beer and leisure money, well a bloody big chunk of it because of this :wacko:

I also bought freehold after investigating leasehold properties, what a con most of those are!!!!

However if you have no problem meeting rents going forward and could find a place you could secure long term then that also makes sense as the money blown on the property would be great fun spent.

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42 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

However if you have no problem meeting rents going forward and could find a place you could secure long term then that also makes sense as the money blown on the property would be great fun spent.

 

 Not to mention that you will also stand a better chance of getting the government to pay for your care later in life. They might even pay part of your rent as well.

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On 07/09/2021 at 17:19, mrsmelly said:

Bit of advice genuineley given. Leave Cornwall alone this year its a bloomin nightmare. I know it well and have 2 kids who live there and its mayhem. Remember september is very busy as the kids are back at school so the sensible child free couples and older folk are about in abundance. Now if you want better beaches, much cheaper parking, better scenery and busy but not mobbed then go to west wales. Sat in  my garden here today at 29 degrees not a cloud in the sky. Free parking in many places even lovely coastal areas and you can go out for a nice meal without resorting to remortgaging your house. I had a message from a friend last evening in Cornwalls Newquay and its horrible at present. Even the lesser known places that locals know are too busy. Its also a covid hot spot.

Well, I am in Helston now and it’s definitely the quiet after the storm. Doing a sea swimming weekend around (not round) the Lizard and hoping the sun comes out. 

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17 minutes ago, Tigerr said:

Well, I am in Helston now and it’s definitely the quiet after the storm. Doing a sea swimming weekend around (not round) the Lizard and hoping the sun comes out. 

I’m very jealous. 
have you been the Blue Anchor?

 

hoping to get down next month. 
 

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32 minutes ago, Tigerr said:

Well, I am in Helston now and it’s definitely the quiet after the storm. Doing a sea swimming weekend around (not round) the Lizard and hoping the sun comes out. 

 

Over heard in Mevagissey yseterday "well its all very pretty but its a shame theres no bingo like we have in Beni'

 

Some people.

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11 minutes ago, Goliath said:

I’m very jealous. 
have you been the Blue Anchor?

 

hoping to get down next month. 
 

November to march are the best months in Cornwall. We used to go down most sundays/mondays and would often be the only people on the beach late evenings 50 yards from out house in Looe harbour. Brilliant in the pubs with regulars in and virtualy zero holiday makers. We very seldom went during the summer, probably only once a month or less as its bloody dreadful at best lol.

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1 minute ago, mrsmelly said:

November to march are the best months in Cornwall. We used to go down most sundays/mondays and would often be the only people on the beach late evenings 50 yards from out house in Looe harbour. Brilliant in the pubs with regulars in and virtualy zero holiday makers. We very seldom went during the summer, probably only once a month or less as its bloody dreadful at best lol.

 

We used to have friends who had an apartment in St Ives.  They used to let us have it gratis for a week in January every year when, of course, there was no-one around.  We always got decent weather and I could never understand why the place was deserted.

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26 minutes ago, Goliath said:

I’m very jealous. 
have you been the Blue Anchor?

 

hoping to get down next month. 
 

I was in there but moments ago. My best friend and I spent h summer of 76 rough camping in the area and The Blue Anchor (actually any pub called the blue Anchor) was a shrine. He stayed on for few years and wanted to know if his mug was still hanging in the back bar. The place is still exactly as it was and for I know his tankard is still there. Certainly the locals installed in their drinking seats looked like they had been there since 1976. The special is to be avoided but the medium is magic. That’s where I joined Camra. It has to be one of the very best pubs in the country.

Edited by Tigerr
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Just now, Neil2 said:

 

We used to have friends who had an apartment in St Ives.  They used to let us have it gratis for a week in January every year when, of course, there was no-one around.  We always got decent weather and I could never understand why the place was deserted.

Its always been the same in Cornwall. The income from tourism drops off a cliff and the county is brilliant in the winter. Its accepted by the gov that all the chefs etc etc etc who live and work there in the summer simply sign on in the winter as they will be needed next summer but there is simply zero work in the winter. I had a bloke for 3 years that used to work in Looe all summer that used to work for me in my pub in Oxfordshire during the winter then return to Looe each summer, but most people were simply unemployed.

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8 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

November to march are the best months in Cornwall. We used to go down most sundays/mondays and would often be the only people on the beach late evenings 50 yards from out house in Looe harbour. Brilliant in the pubs with regulars in and virtualy zero holiday makers. We very seldom went during the summer, probably only once a month or less as its bloody dreadful at best lol.


A bit like November to March is the best time on canals. 😃

 

I’ve spent most me life living  in Falmouth, only left it because there are no muddy ditches to trawl. 

In summer time I rarely walked the 10min from the Stars to the Oddies but would pay me taxi a few quid to drive the long way around. 

I’ll be back...

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6 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Its always been the same in Cornwall. The income from tourism drops off a cliff and the county is brilliant in the winter. Its accepted by the gov that all the chefs etc etc etc who live and work there in the summer simply sign on in the winter as they will be needed next summer but there is simply zero work in the winter. I had a bloke for 3 years that used to work in Looe all summer that used to work for me in my pub in Oxfordshire during the winter then return to Looe each summer, but most people were simply unemployed.

 

I've lived most of my life in the Lake District and when I moved there in the 70's it was just the same, as soon as the clocks went back so did all the tourists.  But that's all changed now, it's virtually a 12 month season so it surprises me that Cornwall, and Devon, are still so quiet "out of season".   I guess a lot of folk go for the weather of course but I reckon the Lakes have become busier simply because folk have more money these days, and there's a lot of money down south.  

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12 minutes ago, Tigerr said:

I was in there but moments ago. My best friend and I spent h summer of 76 rough camping in the area and The Blue Anchor (actually any pub called the blue Anchor) was a shrine. He stayed on for few years and wanted to know if his mug was still hanging in the back bar. The place is still exactly as it was and for I know his tankard is still there. Certainly the locals installed in their drinking seats looked like they had been there since 1976. The special is to be avoided but the medium is magic. That’s where I joined Camra. It has to be one of the very best pubs in the country.

The medium is perfect. 
And they only let it out to a selection of pubs, I guess because they are a small brewery.  I think it’s the Dolphin (?) in Penzance and what was the 7 stars in Penryn (I think that’s closed now from what I last heard, hope I’m wrong). 
Any parties we had we used buy  barrels from the Blue Anchor. 
But I’m more into the Sharp’s Special (rebranded SeaFury maybe 6year ago(?)) 

 

If I could afford a proper boat I’d continually cruise around the Lizard 

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25 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Its always been the same in Cornwall. The income from tourism drops off a cliff and the county is brilliant in the winter. Its accepted by the gov that all the chefs etc etc etc who live and work there in the summer simply sign on in the winter as they will be needed next summer but there is simply zero work in the winter. I had a bloke for 3 years that used to work in Looe all summer that used to work for me in my pub in Oxfordshire during the winter then return to Looe each summer, but most people were simply unemployed.

 

There is little doubt the honey pot locations are very busy, but a lot is being blown out of proportion by the media I fear.

 

We seek out the quieter spots when we can. We stumbled across a little pub in St. Ewe today for lunch, The Crown Inn. And a proper '1 horse town'. We had a cracking lunch (if a tad pricey). Dog friendly. There was us at one table and two older couples at another and a couple stood drinking at the bar. That was it inside and the large beer garden was complete empty.

 

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4 hours ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

Over heard in Mevagissey yseterday "well its all very pretty but its a shame theres no bingo like we have in Beni'

 

Some people.

It's the people you hang around with...

3 hours ago, Neil2 said:

 

I've lived most of my life in the Lake District and when I moved there in the 70's it was just the same, as soon as the clocks went back so did all the tourists.  But that's all changed now, it's virtually a 12 month season so it surprises me that Cornwall, and Devon, are still so quiet "out of season".   I guess a lot of folk go for the weather of course but I reckon the Lakes have become busier simply because folk have more money these days, and there's a lot of money down south.  

We used the Lakes 10 months a year, my parents wouldnt do July and August due to group bookings on the huts and tourists.

The last time I skied on Raise with the LDSC, we were in the car park strapping our skis to our rucksacks ready for the hike up the mine tracks and some chaps with posh cars and skis asked when the next bus up was.....and this was 20 years ago!!

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12 hours ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

There is little doubt the honey pot locations are very busy, but a lot is being blown out of proportion by the media I fear.

 

We seek out the quieter spots when we can. We stumbled across a little pub in St. Ewe today for lunch, The Crown Inn. And a proper '1 horse town'. We had a cracking lunch (if a tad pricey). Dog friendly. There was us at one table and two older couples at another and a couple stood drinking at the bar. That was it inside and the large beer garden was complete empty.

 

We love it in there. Did the landlord let you have a look in the jail house?

 

(The site we stayed on a few times is just up the road from St Ewe in Boswinger)

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13 hours ago, Neil2 said:

 

I've lived most of my life in the Lake District and when I moved there in the 70's it was just the same, as soon as the clocks went back so did all the tourists.  But that's all changed now, it's virtually a 12 month season so it surprises me that Cornwall, and Devon, are still so quiet "out of season".   I guess a lot of folk go for the weather of course but I reckon the Lakes have become busier simply because folk have more money these days, and there's a lot of money down south.  

We had a week in the Lakes in July.

 

Before we set off we got all of the usual the place is packed, it will be too busy, you won't enjoy it comments. So we expected it to be difficult to find places to stay and places to park during the day. It was the complete opposite. We managed to get parked up every day where we wanted, booked onto a couple of sites last minute for the night and never struggled to get into pubs or restaurants when we wanted them.

 

We had a great time and thoroughly enjoyed it despite the weather not being great at times. Syd wasn't bothered about a bit of rain though. He thoroughly enjoyed himself.

 

210688700_4352111414841466_3859976499991966134_n.jpg.d4a29c3b67cb96530bd99c284822c63f.jpg

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