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Inflatable bed/mattress


Sanddancer
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An inflatable mattress is likely to be cold when the ambient temperature falls.  A better solution for comfort is a good quality self inflating sleeping mat, at least 5cm thick.  I have used an Alpkit one for 5+ years when camping and no longer get cold when the temperature falls.  It can also be used as a spare bed if/when guests stop over.

 

ETA: My mat is Similar to these

Edited by Hotspur
  • Greenie 1
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We bought one of those Yawn things advertised on telly when we moved. We knew that our furniture wouldn't be there when we got to our new home. It was one of the most uncomfortable things I have ever slept on and as an ex squaddie I have slept in some bad places in my time. It was also freezing cold as the cold came up from the floor. I suppose if we had used a topper it might have been a bit better but as soon as our regular beds arrived the following day the blow up bed went in the bin.

  • Greenie 1
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An air bed should only be inflated to the point where the lowest part of your body still touches the floor, but everywhere else is supported. Double airbeds are a total no-no. I shouls imagine a double waterbed would be the same as one turns over. 

A standby these days must be memory foam which can be rolled tightly for storage.

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21 hours ago, Hotspur said:

An inflatable mattress is likely to be cold when the ambient temperature falls.  A better solution for comfort is a good quality self inflating sleeping mat, at least 5cm thick.  I have used an Alpkit one for 5+ years when camping and no longer get cold when the temperature falls.  It can also be used as a spare bed if/when guests stop over.

 

 

This isn't really true.  The important measure for warmth is known as an r-value.  As a mininum, an r-value of 3 or above is what you need to be looking for.  Cheap airbeds will have an r-value of less than 1 (but they probably won't quote it).  Some self-inflating mats are as low as 2.  But the warmest airbeds have an r-value of 7 or more and are used for going up Everest etc.  My airbed has an r-value of 4.8 and works well for winter camping in the uk while being light enough to hike with, and it's thicker/comfier than any self-inflating mat I've tried, unless you're talking about huge things which fill a car boot.  It did cost £200 though.

https://www.absolute-snow.co.uk/V/Nemo_Tensor_Alpine_Lightweight_Sleeping_Pad_Regular_Mummy-(297836)?gclid=cjwkcajwmqkjbhaweiwamvgt6jzyt8dgthyaenfnsdqegkxudzp3kxfjfy2u0lxirvwoydu5uvwocxoc-piqavd_bwe

 

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/r-value-explained-i206

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