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😂 how often is this excuse used then


bigcol

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Love to know,

 

so how many times have you shouted back  the following.then?

 

CANT GO ANY SLOWER !!!!!!!  {this is 

 

is dropping in and outer of forward reverse gear that difficult ??
or is this a a growing art now days.

 

this isn’t just hirers, but all boat owners as well

same old, same old I suppose 


the faint screams of a blustering red  face man, who doesn't understand boatman ship

 

Big Col

 

 

Edited by bigcol
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If I have to drop out of gear I lose steering and then likely to hit you so better I keep in gear and go past at 2mph.

If a boat is tied up properly then 2mph isn't going to make it bounce around.

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49 minutes ago, bigcol said:

is dropping in and outer of forward reverse gear that difficult ??

 

Difficult?

Not only grammatically impossible, but physically so as well.

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50 minutes ago, bigcol said:

Love to know,

 

 

is dropping in and outer of forward reverse gear that difficult ??

 

 

No it is not, but it means that one loses steering until forward gear is re-engaged. I've had to do it a few times when following water snails. The solution, I have found, is to rie up, put the kettle on and set off again after about 20 minutes. They should have got a quarter of a mile ahead by then.

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10 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

If I have to drop out of gear I lose steering and then likely to hit you so better I keep in gear and go past at 2mph.

If a boat is tied up properly then 2mph isn't going to make it bounce around.

Need to buy a better boat

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1 hour ago, bigcol said:

 

is dropping in and outer of forward reverse gear that difficult ??
or is this a a growing art now days.

 

If you've moored such that it requires boats to move so slowly that they have to constantly drop into neutral, then you either need to moor somewhere else or moor properly. Consideration works both ways.

 

1 hour ago, bigcol said:


the faint screams of a blustering red  face man, who doesn't understand boatman ship

 

 

 

One who understands boatmanship won't have a problem mooring more sensibly.

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22 minutes ago, tehmarks said:

 

If you've moored such that it requires boats to move so slowly that they have to constantly drop into neutral, then you either need to moor somewhere else or moor properly. Consideration works both ways.

 

 

One who understands boatmanship won't have a problem mooring more sensibly.

 

I don't think col was talking about "all boats" having to move so slowly that they have to drop into neutral now and then. He was talking about "some boats" that are obviously going too fast, who excuse themselves with the "as slow as I can go" excuse.

 

Given that we all manage to moor, quite precisely sometimes, and mooring requires ending up stopped, I would suggest that we are all able to control our boats with a speed from less than tickover, right down to stopped.

 

There is no excuse for going too fast past moored boats. I suppose col could ask those giving him a hard time what speed is too fast, below which it is "not too fast". I've seen 2mph mentioned here a few times, so maybe that is a good starting point?

 

By the same token, if boats doing 2mph or less, (or whatever speed is decided), make your boat move more than you would like, you could tie up better :) 

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Simply give them a big smile,look at your watch and shout "it's two thirty"or whatever time it is.

Even if your boat is a big 'un,I really can't see that at 2mph you are going to cause a moored boat to move much unless it is tied up with a couple of feet of slack.

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I forget where it was when, approaching a line of moored boats there was a sign on the bank saying "Slow past moored boats". And then on the first moored boat "No! Slower than that!".

 

 

4 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

 

Even if your boat is a big 'un,I really can't see that at 2mph you are going to cause a moored boat to move much unless it is tied up with a couple of feet of slack.

 Or if you are a deep drafted boat in a narrow shallow channel, in which case there will be a degree of water displacement no matter how slowly you pass.

Edited by David Mack
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I has somebody red-faced shouting at me to slow down last year on the Soar in the middle of Leicester. He was moored on the offside at Castle Gardens, the river is deep and more than 100' wide here and I was passing maybe 60' away from him so there was no chance of any wake disturbing him, but it didn't stop him shouting... 😞

Edited by IanD
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Additionally, try going dead slow on a really windy day....

Just now, IanD said:

I has somebody red-faced shouting at me to slow down last year on the Soar in the middle of Leicester. He was moored on the offside at Castle Gardens, the river is deep and more than 100' wide here and I was passing maybe 70' away from him so there was no chance of any wake disturbing him, but it didn't stop him shouting... 😞

How was your selective deafness doing, that day?

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2 minutes ago, Stilllearning said:

Additionally, try going dead slow on a really windy day....

Dead easy, you just keep in a straight line by bouncing off the moored boats 😉

2 minutes ago, Stilllearning said:

How was your selective deafness doing, that day?

I just gave him a withering look and ignored him.

Edited by IanD
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3 minutes ago, IanD said:

I has somebody red-faced shouting at me to slow down last year on the Soar in the middle of Leicester. He was moored on the offside at Castle Gardens, the river is deep and more than 100' wide here and I was passing maybe 60' away from him so there was no chance of any wake disturbing him, but it didn't stop him shouting... 😞

That's the Kings Mile, 1st real chance to blow the cobwebs out of the chimbly usually

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4 minutes ago, matty40s said:

That's the Kings Mile, 1st real chance to blow the cobwebs out of the chimbly usually

Indeed, but I wasn't even thrashing it, about 1500rpm on a Beta 39 which was just about 4mph in deep water (according to GPS) with not much wake. Even if I'd been hammering it I doubt it would have moved his boat, he was just like one of those dogs who barks loudly and pointlessly at everything that passes.

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6 minutes ago, IanD said:

Dead easy, you just keep in a straight line by bouncing off the moored boats 😉

I just gave him a withering look and ignored him.

That is exactly what happened to us moored up a few weeks ago in Nantwich. Boats going slowly past the moored boats were getting blown across the canal and were bouncing off at least 3 of us that were moored up. If they had put a few more revs on they would have been able to hold their own line.

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8 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

That is exactly what happened to us moored up a few weeks ago in Nantwich. Boats going slowly past the moored boats were getting blown across the canal and were bouncing off at least 3 of us that were moored up. If they had put a few more revs on they would have been able to hold their own line.

We were coming round the bend into Aspley Basin in Huddersfield a couple of years back on a windy day, I was on the bank walking along to the water point, my daughter was steering -- with some difficulty due to the strong crosswind, certainly wasn't going more than 2mph. A bloke stuck his head out and gave her a mouthful about slowing down, which she did. Consequence was not enough steerage way, the wind blew the boat across the canal away from the towpath/water point and it ended up stranded opposite -- funnily enough, up against a moored boat who wasn't happy either. Took a lot of thrashing about with the pole and throwing mooring lines right across the canal before we managed to pull it across to the water point against the wind.

 

There was some sympathy from another boater there who said "Yeah, he's a tosser, hasn't got a f*ckin' clue"...

Edited by IanD
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Mooring on springs, multiple reeved, really does solve the problem of boat movement when someone passes. There is not enough movement to bother about.

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3 hours ago, bigcol said:

the faint screams of a blustering red  face man, who doesn't understand boatman ship

Big Col

 

Never mind - if you keep at it you will eventually learn that going into and out of gear is not good for the engine and leaves you out of control of your boat. The art of boatmanship is learning about things like that.

 

Tam

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Some years ago, I met someone who told me that his response to anyone shoutuing at him as he passed, was to look at his wrist watch and shout the time. By the time that the shouter had realised what he had said,  he was well away.

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55 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

When we loaded on a canal like the Oxford fishermen were always shouting about speed. Some chance of even 3 miles an hour but we shifted a lot of water just going along.

 

On the Oxford, a fisherman shouted at me for stopping because the next fisherman along hadn't lifted his rod or suggested that he would. I now realise, I'm meant to just trust that in a row of ten or so anglers each one will lift their rod at the last minute...

 

The K&A is much nicer so far.

50 minutes ago, IanD said:

We were coming round the bend into Aspley Basin in Huddersfield a couple of years back on a windy day, I was on the bank walking along to the water point, my daughter was steering -- with some difficulty due to the strong crosswind, certainly wasn't going more than 2mph. A bloke stuck his head out and gave her a mouthful about slowing down, which she did. Consequence was not enough steerage way, the wind blew the boat across the canal away from the towpath/water point and it ended up stranded opposite -- funnily enough, up against a moored boat who wasn't happy either. Took a lot of thrashing about with the pole and throwing mooring lines right across the canal before we managed to pull it across to the water point against the wind.

 

There was some sympathy from another boater there who said "Yeah, he's a tosser, hasn't got a f*ckin' clue"...

 

When I started boating a year or so ago I blindly adhered to 'slow down' signs, then got blown into another boat, yelled at etc. etc.

 

Too many variables to have a one-size-fits-all rule, easiest just for everyone to chill out.

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