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Engine Hours?


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2 hours ago, frahkn said:

If you are going to be viewing a lot of boats you will need a better sense of humour.

 

Or perhaps it was you who lacked the sense of humour when responding to the OP's rather sarcastic comment? Depends which way you look at it.

 

I do all my own engine servicing and keep a record of engine hours at which each service was done. I'm not really surprised that many canal boaters don't keep records.

 

If I was selling I wouldn't care if a prospective buyer distrusted my records. There has to be an element of trust in any transaction.

Edited by blackrose
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3 hours ago, Bee said:

Hard to tell. Most or many cars average approx. 35 mph throughout their lives, 1000 hours on a boat equals about 35,000 miles so 3000 miles could mean that the engine is getting middle aged but as its been under fairly constant and reasonable load it could well be perfectly ok for years. Anything much over 5000 hours has seen a lot of use but most engines can be rebuilt almost indefinately  and most engines are not highly sophisticated.

The boat engine is unlikely to have been stressed as much as a car engine, nor revved as high, so a higher number of hours would be expected.

 

Some engines are designed to be long-lived, others are designed to be disposable. For example old Perkins engines were designed to be everlasting (and many still appear to be so) but our original engine in 1991 was the Perkins MC42, the first of their modern range (based on a fork-lift engine); despite rigorous servicing and much replacement of parts it showed signs of wear after 10000 hours until after about 15000 hours it was completely worn out and not worth rebuilding. Our replacement was a Beta 43, which after 4000 hours seems to be just nicely run-in and will probably last for ever.

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The Misubishi 1.4 in my first shareboat was worn out at 8,000 hours.

 

The Indian built BMX 1.8 in the second shareboat lasted until 13,500 hours.

 

I have seen plant equipment using the Kabota 1.9 (base engine for Beta 43) with 25,000 hours on them and plant equipment is not often meticulously maintained.

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7 hours ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

 

When we sold our boat ours was only working intermittently, it did appear to still be counting (we think!) but would often decide it wasn't going to display what the hours actually were. Very common with Isuzu panels apparently.

Our last boat had a Barrus Shire and the hour counter was very sporadic (over a period of 20 years) but came on again when it felt like it.  It certainly didn't like the cold and was shy of direct sunlight. As a result I kept a manual record of hours (for the maintenance log) and was never more than .2 of an hour adrift.  Glad I never spent any money on a new one.

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Our boat has a BMC 1.8 that has over 11000 recorded hours - I think its true. It was an ex-hire boat and it has been well maintained. It doesn't use oil and doesn't smoke so it won't be getting changed until it breaks!! Having said that the alternator bracket broke the last time we were out - it was an odd one as because of the installation the alternator is on the opposite side to a normal BMC. Also unusually the engine is coupled to a PRM 260 gearbox!!

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5 minutes ago, Richard T said:

Our boat has a BMC 1.8 that has over 11000 recorded hours - I think its true. It was an ex-hire boat and it has been well maintained. It doesn't use oil and doesn't smoke so it won't be getting changed until it breaks!! Having said that the alternator bracket broke the last time we were out - it was an odd one as because of the installation the alternator is on the opposite side to a normal BMC. Also unusually the engine is coupled to a PRM 260 gearbox!!

Nothing unusual about a 1.8D having a 260 PRM box, many had the earlier 160 and mine has a 280. I know of many that have done many more hours than yours.

If you maintain it well it will not break, just wear gracefully. These engines were good for 400,000 to 500,000 miles plus in the vans

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11 hours ago, Richard T said:

Our boat has a BMC 1.8 that has over 11000 recorded hours - I think its true. It was an ex-hire boat and it has been well maintained. It doesn't use oil and doesn't smoke so it won't be getting changed until it breaks!! Having said that the alternator bracket broke the last time we were out - it was an odd one as because of the installation the alternator is on the opposite side to a normal BMC. Also unusually the engine is coupled to a PRM 260 gearbox!!

How's the boat liking its holiday out of the water?

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11 hours ago, Mike Todd said:

How's the boat liking its holiday out of the water?

Its now back in. It enjoyed its time out of the water as it got blacked and part painted. It looks a lot better for it.

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After 10 years I do not have a single sheet of paperwork to support my engine maintenance program other than the original purchase from new.  Beta 43, 1850 hours, nicely run in.

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We have a barrus shire 45 I have kept a diary from day one every place we've stoped at every lock swing / lift bridge , how much diesel and engine hrs every day, just changed the engine oil and filter today 3999 hours, will be changing all fuel filters & both alternator belts tomorrow as well as the gearbox oil , engine 6 & 1/2 years old 

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How often do you change oil and filters?

Did mine last June (Barrus Shire 45) but only did about 14 days cruising and so far only 6 days this year.

Not sure if I'll do it this year, maybe save the planet by not throwing away perfectly good oil and filters.

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9 minutes ago, dixi188 said:

How often do you change oil and filters?

Did mine last June (Barrus Shire 45) but only did about 14 days cruising and so far only 6 days this year.

Not sure if I'll do it this year, maybe save the planet by not throwing away perfectly good oil and filters.

 

 

Part of the reason to change the oil is to remove the acid carbon 'infested' oil that will etch into your vital bits if left.

It is recommended that if a boat is to be left standing for a period (say over Winter) that the oil should be changed as part of the Winterising process.

 

If your boat has had the same oil for over 12 months, and you are proposing to leave it another 12 months you will be doing damage to your engine. It'll cost more in engine rebuilds than 5 litres of oil,

 

The base number (BN) is a property that is more associated with engine oils rather than industrial oils. It can be defined as the oil’s ability to neutralize acids that are produced during use. The higher the base number in the engine oil, the more acid it will be able to neutralize during use.

New engine oils usually have a range of 5 to 15 BN. As oil is used in service, it becomes contaminated with acids, causing the base number to drop over time. By using oil analysis for your engine oil, you will be able to track the BN of your oil and determine how much life is remaining. Once the base number drops below 3, this is considered too low and should trigger an oil change for your engine.

The most common reasons for a drop in the base number are related to low-quality fuel and oil oxidation. During combustion, a low-quality fuel with high sulfur content can produce sulfuric acid, which attacks the oil and causes a drop in the base number. Oil oxidation as a result of the engine overheating or an attempt to extend the oil drain interval is another reason you may see a drop in the BN.

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18 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

Part of the reason to change the oil is to remove the acid carbon 'infested' oil that will etch into your vital bits if left.

It is recommended that if a boat is to be left standing for a period (say over Winter) that the oil should be changed as part of the Winterising process.

This has always puzzled me. Surely when the boat is left standing for a long period such as this, all the oil will have drained into the sump and will be nowhere near any "vital bits" ???

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14 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

This has always puzzled me. Surely when the boat is left standing for a long period such as this, all the oil will have drained into the sump and will be nowhere near any "vital bits" ???

 

 

I think its all sorts of chemicals, including water vapour (from combustion) that causes the problems.

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53 minutes ago, dixi188 said:

How often do you change oil and filters?

Did mine last June (Barrus Shire 45) but only did about 14 days cruising and so far only 6 days this year.

Not sure if I'll do it this year, maybe save the planet by not throwing away perfectly good oil and filters.

I change engine oil & filter & gearbox oil every 250 hours 

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13 hours ago, luggsy said:

We have a barrus shire 45 I have kept a diary from day one every place we've stoped at every lock swing / lift bridge , how much diesel and engine hrs every day, just changed the engine oil and filter today 3999 hours, will be changing all fuel filters & both alternator belts tomorrow as well as the gearbox oil , engine 6 & 1/2 years old 

OMG that is super impressive. You sound very organised. I struggle to remember the different places we overnight let alone anything else. (Hubby is good at changing oil & servicing though).

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1 hour ago, dixi188 said:

How often do you change oil and filters?

Did mine last June (Barrus Shire 45) but only did about 14 days cruising and so far only 6 days this year.

Not sure if I'll do it this year, maybe save the planet by not throwing away perfectly good oil and filters.

Depends on the engine and the size of the sump. If changing the oil uses 4l to 5l, then the manufacturers recommended change frequency is often around 100 to 125 hours*. If changing the oil needs 8 to 10l, then the frequency goes down to 200 to 250 hours*.

Oil gets more acidic as it is used, so not changing it every year, even if it hasn't been used much can be a false economy. 5l of oil is minimal environmental damage compared with the150l* or more of diesel burnt in 100 hours, provided it is disposed of responsibly. I believe used oil is mostly burnt.

 

Jen

 

*All this depends on engine type, boat size, usage, day of the week, boaters sock colour, etc etc etc. Your kilometerage may vary. No warranty expressed, or implied and so on and so forth.

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The acidic compounds in old sump oil are far less now we have to use low sulphur diesel, but I would certainly change it in the autumn if  there was to be little running over winter. It's not worth not to.

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I got chatting to another boater about oil changes, his was every 250 hours or every 12 months, so he did it annually, that way he saved two oil changes and filters a year. No I didn't bother, life is too short.

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6 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I got chatting to another boater about oil changes, his was every 250 hours or every 12 months, so he did it annually, that way he saved two oil changes and filters a year. No I didn't bother, life is too short.

 

On our Lister it was every 100 hours which equated to roughly once a month. Having read horror stories of Listers destroying themselves at 120 hours I stuck religiously to it

It literally took 10 minutes after a 5 minute engine run to warm it up.

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11 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

On our Lister it was every 100 hours which equated to roughly once a month. Having read horror stories of Listers destroying themselves at 120 hours I stuck religiously to it

It literally took 10 minutes after a 5 minute engine run to warm it up.

Doing short 5 minute warm ups will do more engine damage than leaving the old oil sat in the sump over winter.

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Just changed both fuel filters after 2000 hours still like new , I have a fuelguard fitted and have used fuelset from day one , also changed gearbox oil just the alternator belts to change now , going to leave them as my back is fxxking killing me , boat is in for blacking tomorrow so will change them tomorrow, for those who do not know wat the fuelguard is see picture 

IMG_0733.JPG

IMG_0732.JPG

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