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Where we moor the distance between pontoons is less than 6 inches wider than two narrowboats side by side which makes getting back into position along side another boat a bit tricky if there is a crosswind. Apparently the mooring was made narrower as it was designed for a widebeam. Also the pontoons are quite narrow. This made me wonder if other marinas  have wider gaps between boats and wider pontoons.  Is there a standard or  does it just depend on how many boats the marina owners wants to squeeze in?  I think we need to take an inch tape the next time we are looking at marinas 🙂  

 

haggis

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14 minutes ago, haggis said:

Where we moor the distance between pontoons is less than 6 inches wider than two narrowboats side by side which makes getting back into position along side another boat a bit tricky if there is a crosswind. Apparently the mooring was made narrower as it was designed for a widebeam. Also the pontoons are quite narrow. This made me wonder if other marinas  have wider gaps between boats and wider pontoons.  Is there a standard or  does it just depend on how many boats the marina owners wants to squeeze in?  I think we need to take an inch tape the next time we are looking at marinas 🙂  

 

haggis

 

In Calcutt Locks marine you could get another narrowboat between the two on adjacent jetties so its all down to the marina.

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We have moored in Wigram's, Ventnor and Kings Bromley.

 

Wigrams pontoons are fairly well spaced out as they are long finger pontoons accommodating 3 or 4 boats each side. Photo 1
 

Ventnor pontoons have about a 12" gap between boats. Photo 2

 

Kings Bromley has about 9-12" gap between boats. It does however have "Super berths" where you have a pontoon either side of the boat. Photo 3

Wigrams.jpg

Ventnor Marina.JPG

Kings Bromley.jpg

Edited by Ray T
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There is a widebeam (10-11ft) on the next mooring to me at Blackthorn, still about 3ft between the two of us.

It would be tight if it was 14ft beam.😱

 

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I think modern built marina's tend to be built to pack the most in possible, at Overwater you could fit a couple of fenders between and that was about it, Dunchurch is the same. Always a relief when it's windy to get back and see the neighbour is out so there's a bit more margin for error 😆

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Also depends if the adjacent canal is built for wide, or narrowboats. Here, you can fit a narrow and a fatty boat between each jetty, but it is a wide canal. Two narrowboats between jetties gives lots of space between.

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1 hour ago, Ray T said:

 

Wigrams.jpg

 

 

Where the jetties are more than one boat long you need a 7ft+ gap down the middle so that boats moored to the landward end can get in and out. Not so where the jetties accommodate only a single boat each side.

  • Greenie 1
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Our mooring is designed with about a foot to spare between two boats. Which is fine until one of the boaters decides he needs big fat fenders about six inches in diameter... 

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1 hour ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

In Calcutt Locks marine you could get another narrowboat between the two on adjacent jetties so its all down to the marina.

Tony, that was because the jetty that you was on had 2 narrow boats lengthways on it so you had the gap to allow the front boat to go past the rear boat. On the single jetties in Locks marina at Calcutt there is about 10 inch gap between boats.

Edited by Tonka
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Less than about one foot mekes it easy to walk down between the boats one foot on each gunwhale. (either ask next door or wait till they go shopping)

 

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3 hours ago, Tonka said:

Tony, that was because the jetty that you was on had 2 narrow boats lengthways on it so you had the gap to allow the front boat to go past the rear boat. On the single jetties in Locks marina at Calcutt there is about 10 inch gap between boats.

Correct, it only the pontoons in Locks that have more than one boat that have the necessary wide gap.  In Calcutt's Meadows marina there is about 2ft between boats, and as it is very windy at the far end where we are it can be a challenge not to touch either the pontoon or the neighbouring boat, particular if you want to reverse in.

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Why would you want to avoid touching the pontoon? You'll be touching it when you're moored up! 

 

As for not touching the boat next to you, it's fine if you do so gently. That boat will be doing exactly the same thing to you when it comes in to moor.

 

I am assuming, of course, that you're on friendly terms with your neighbour, but why wouldn't you be?

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At Aston Marina there is at least 18" between boats. Until I read this thread I thought it was a bit mean. Reversing on to the mooring is impossible if there is any kind of breeze.

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10 minutes ago, Cheshire cat said:

At Aston Marina there is at least 18" between boats. Until I read this thread I thought it was a bit mean. Reversing on to the mooring is impossible if there is any kind of breeze.

And going in in any direction if the gap is a lot less is even more challenging 😀

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In new Mancetter Marina on the Coventry, on one side of the marina the pontoons are just one boat deep, and spacing between boats on the single berths are about 12 inches or so apart. On the other side of the marina there are finger berths, with 2 or 3 boats berthed along one side of the pontoon. There appears to be plenty of space for a boat to pass in the middle. 

 

Seeing that Rothern own and built the marina, no doubt Mancetter Marina is their flagship, their shop window for marina construction. TBH we're really impressed at the detail.  https://www.therothengroup.co.uk/

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Obviously designed by the same people that laid out the car parking in our local supermarket. I shall be dangling fenders off the door handles soon to fend off the stupid great 4x4's that people seem to need these days. Back in my day a Morris traveller was adequate for any purposes. Grumble grumble.

  • Greenie 1
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When you're moored at the end of a 3 berth pontoon, and there're spaces along the pontoon where there are no boats moored, it's a freezing windy night with ice on top of the water; it's 2 in the morning and you're tottering along the pontoon towards the bank, in one hand you've got a torch, and in the other hand there's a lead with a dog on the end that's eaten something it shouldn't and now it's got a gippy tummy........ got THAT t-shirt! 🥶

Edited by Jennifer McM
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  • 3 weeks later...

I prefer if it’s a tight space between boats, especially if theirs a side wind blowing, as if bolf boats have fenders out, once the nose/stern is in, your not going anywhere. Your not going to be blown off your berth.

when mooring you should always have fenders out.

 If there’s a mistake, or even a mooring calculation due to adverse weather, then to use another boat to get into visiting mooring ,

then it’s a good job all round no damage, and everyone’s safe.

 

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I'm more concerned about the length of finger pontoons. Anything less than the length of the boat I consider unsafe.

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3 minutes ago, pearley said:

I'm more concerned about the length of finger pontoons. Anything less than the length of the boat I consider unsafe.

I find short pontoons really annoying and as you say makes mooring unsafe especially when it's raining.

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The newer basin (Sunrise) in Ventnor Marina has very decent gaps between boats, all on single-length pontoons. The gaps must be a good 3 or 4 feet. If I remember I'll measure it when we get back in about a week or so.

 

Those gaps, the single boat length  wider than average pontoons, and numerous other factors make it very likely that we will never wish to move to another marina.

 

See screenshot from Google Maps

 

Screenshot_20210531-230544.png

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All marinas have wind generators!  Totally agree on short pontoon lengths especially the floating type like in Bancroft basin.  It would be more useful for planners to consider the prevailing wind when positioning the service wharf.

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