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1 hour ago, dave moore said:

 Back in the day, Claytons boats were known as gas boats because they often loaded at gasworks.

 

Wasn't it "gas tar" as well as other fluids they carried?

Edited by Ray T
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AIUI Claytons main cargoes were crude tar from a variety of midlands gas works to the tar distilleries; and lubricating oil or fuel oil from Stanlow to the shell depot in Oldbury. There were less frequent cargoes of "gas water" also known as ammoniacal liquor from the various gas works - this was water used to scrub the gas, removing ammonia, which resulted in a product  which could be used as a high nitrogen fertiliser and probably a variety of chemical processes. I believe there were also bulk cargoes of the tar distilleries products - particularly creosote to the London area both for the railway companies and GPO Telephone poles. 

 

springy

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I was around when Clayton’s finished in 1966, in those days, the boats were known as gas boats by boatmen and us enthusiasts. Whether this coincides with historic correctness I don’t know. I learned the term from young Charlie Atkins who was employed by Clayton’s at the time.

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Gas water, gas tar, creosote - all by-products from a gas works which were served by tanker boats of Claytons.

Historic correctness sounds like pedantry to me, and as seems to be typical nowadays - all that counts from people who were neither around at the time nor involved in the working of them.

 

Trust a working man to keep things simple - Gas boats.

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Derek I wasn’t being a pedant, just asking a question.

As a side, I called them “tar” boats as that is what Mike refers to them as.

He did steer a couple of them in his time.

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Artistic License, I was wondering about the railway viaduct as well, which seems single track with what looks like a Castle Class on the head of train Chester bound.

 

Talking about Thomas Claytons, Alan Faulkener in his book on Claytons of Oldbury calls the craft gas boats, but I suppose the principal traffic in their craft became fuel oil from Stanlow.

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So the boat hs clothes over it's tanker deck, the train is wrong line working, the heron is about half scale, and there is rather a lot of marginal vegetation for a cast iron trough... 

Aside from that, what's wrong with it? ;) 

 

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1 hour ago, magpie patrick said:

So the boat hs clothes over it's tanker deck, the train is wrong line working, the heron is about half scale, and there is rather a lot of marginal vegetation for a cast iron trough... 

Aside from that, what's wrong with it? ;) 

 

Ellum is at an odd angle.

 

Coping stones go the length of the aqueduct in the jigsaw picture.

Edited by Ray T
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8 hours ago, Ray T said:

Derek I wasn’t being a pedant, just asking a question.

As a side, I called them “tar” boats as that is what Mike refers to them as.

He did steer a couple of them in his time.

Sorry, didn't mean to sound grumpy. Sign of the times.

 

Heron is a bit short in the leg department.

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On 23/04/2021 at 13:56, Heartland said:

Artistic License, I was wondering about the railway viaduct as well, which seems single track with what looks like a Castle Class on the head of train Chester bound.

 

Talking about Thomas Claytons, Alan Faulkener in his book on Claytons of Oldbury calls the craft gas boats, but I suppose the principal traffic in their craft became fuel oil from Stanlow.

 

The Castle loco is perfectly feasible, the GWR had a direct line from Paddington via Birmingham to Chester, and operated a joint line with the LNWR from Chester to Warrington. The GWR ran regular trains through Chester from 1860 until Nationalization.

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer
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1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

 

The Castle loco is perfectly feasible, the GWR had a direct line from Paddington via Birmingham to Chester, and operated a joint line with the LNWR from Chester to Warrington. The GWR ran regular trains through Chester from 1860 until Nationalization.

 

 

Indeed, and not just feasible but quite possibly accurate for an express train on that route, which has mileposts datumed at Paddington and once went by the fanciful name of the Didcot & Chester line (which is still reflected in the line reference for the section from Didcot to Birmingham).

 

That said the combination of a locomotive that appears to be in BR green livery with a complete rake of GWR designed and liveried coaches suggests the prototype (photograph) used for inspiration is from the preserved era.

 

Whilst it’s a composite image of grander objects than reality would likely have thrown up it’s a lot more accurate than many canal related pictures.

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14 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

Indeed, and not just feasible but quite possibly accurate for an express train on that route, which has mileposts datumed at Paddington and once went by the fanciful name of the Didcot & Chester line (which is still reflected in the line reference for the section from Didcot to Birmingham).

 

That said the combination of a locomotive that appears to be in BR green livery with a complete rake of GWR designed and liveried coaches suggests the prototype (photograph) used for inspiration is from the preserved era.

 

Whilst it’s a composite image of grander objects than reality would likely have thrown up it’s a lot more accurate than many canal related pictures.

 

The Coach livery is correct for the Loco livery. The Western Region used chocolate and cream for its express train coaches from the mid 50's. until the early 1960's. I remember them well on the 4.00pm Paddington to Birminham Express which barrelled through Northolt Junction (now South Ruislip) about 4.15pm each day at something approaching 90mph, always hauled by a King or two Castles. We used to run down from school to the station every day, in the hope that we would "spot" a previously unrecorded Loco. I still have my 1958/59 Ian Allan combined album

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1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

 

The Coach livery is correct for the Loco livery. The Western Region used chocolate and cream for its express train coaches from the mid 50's. until the early 1960's. I remember them well on the 4.00pm Paddington to Birminham Express which barrelled through Northolt Junction (now South Ruislip) about 4.15pm each day at something approaching 90mph, always hauled by a King or two Castles. We used to run down from school to the station every day, in the hope that we would "spot" a previously unrecorded Loco. I still have my 1958/59 Ian Allan combined album

And those would I suspect have been BR MK1 coaches on which versions of pre-Nationalisation colours were adopted for each Region following an initial period of standardised carmine and cream livery. In each case the trim and lining differed from the Grouping company livery.

 

My observation was simply that the rake of coaches look to be GWR designs in GWR livery (and not any later application of BR (WR) colours) and that whatever material the artist used as the base for the train likely dated from the preservation era. While I suspect that BR liveried locomotives did haul rakes of pre-Nationailsation rolling stock in pre-Nationalisation liveries immediately post-Nationalisation I’ll stick with my initial observation.

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