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Quality of paint finish


NB DW2
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Hi,

 

I've currently got a boat under offer at the moment.  In August last year it had a full repaint, including hull, cabin sides and roof etc in 2 pack paint.  The work done is described as:

"Shot blasted, epoxy coated in JOTUN epoxy, plus 3 coats of PPG top coat. Grit blast Hull and 2K JOTUN JOTO 80 with up to 10 year cover, back to base"

 

It's evident the windows weren't removed as I can see the circular brush marks around the portholes, and also paint on the window frames which I was able to pick off.  There also appears to be little specs / rash within the paint, is how I'd best describe it, visible too.

 

A survey wasn't done during the time it was out of the water or when the current owners' bought it 3 years ago.  What concerns me is the finish doesn't appear too brilliant.  The cosmetic cabin sides I can deal with, but if this was a rushed job and done to the standards the photos suggest, then what concerns me is the hull sides.  Was it prepared properly?  Did they allow millscale to develop before painting it?  And what are all those white marks all over it?

 

The work cost £10k and only done 6 months ago.

 

Am I being too picky here?  Would a bad job on the hull sides be apparent during a survey?  With it being 2 pack paint the surveyer won't be able to chip bit off.

 

 

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Edited by NB DW2
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Millscale won’t develop after blasting, you may get a little flash rust, but that’s easily removed.

 

It looks as though you’ve got one of two things, microblistering or solvent pop. There’s plenty written online about the two. I’d be more worried if it were microblistering as it will only get worse.

 

Hope this helps.

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Not great is it. Cutting in around windows is amateurish.  I would think that the hull paint is different stuff than gloss topcoat, its what I have on my boat anyway and you certainly wouldn't use it for its attractive shiny appearance.  Sometimes ordinary paint does that if you apply it on a hot day and the brush marks look as though the paint was drying before it had 'flowed'.  If the hull paint below the waterline is at all iffy I fear the vendor has wasted a lot of money. I guess the only cure for the topsides is flatting the surface down and another top coat. Is it on one side only? if so it could be that the sun was shining on that side.

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13 hours ago, NB DW2 said:

 

 

Am I being too picky here?  Would a bad job on the hull sides be apparent during a survey?  With it being 2 pack paint the surveyer won't be able to chip bit off.

 

 

I don't think many boat surveyors are paintwork specialists. They might state something like "requires blacking" on a survey, but most wouldn't comment on the quality of a 6 month old paint job unless they saw corrosion around the windows, etc. Also any paint can be removed with an angle grinder by a surveyor including two-pack epoxy.

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Thanks.

 

Just a bit nervous about it all.  The boat was bought 3 years ago by the current owners' and has been marina based since.   No survey done at the time of the repaint and no survey done at the time they bought it, so no point of reference.  What worries me is a galvanic isolator was only fitted during the repaint, so it's sat in a marina without this maybe since 2008!

 

The surveyor said that with it being 2 pack finish they don't scrape it off during a survey.  The seller mentioned the same thing.  Can deep pits be picked up, if this is the case, during survey?  The surveyor again mentioned he can measure the overall depth of the hull across various places but won't know if they skimmed or welded any pitting before they painted it.

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Thanks.  Just had a read through some previous threads.

 

If it looks like that now and six months it's going to look awful in a few years judging from what I've just been reading on here.

 

And for £10k on a 45ft boat, without having taken the windows out, it's terrible.

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A paint job, costing £!0k should involve all windows and fittings being removed before stripping and re painting. As already said cutting in (badly) around windows is very amateurish. Personally, I would walk away, unless you are prepared to spend another £10k getting the job done properly.  I know it was nearly nine years ago, but I only paid £5k for a 52ft boat to be repainted, and that involved everthing being removed, cabin taken back to bare metal, and far more than three coats of paint applied. I saw the boat eighteen months ago, and it still looked newly painted, and still very shiney

 

 

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer
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3 hours ago, NB DW2 said:

Thanks.  Just had a read through some previous threads.

 

If it looks like that now and six months it's going to look awful in a few years judging from what I've just been reading on here.

 

And for £10k on a 45ft boat, without having taken the windows out, it's terrible.

 

I agree with other comments. For a £10k job, the windows should have been removed. And the fact that you have paint on the windows and cutting-in marks suggest lack of attention to detail , and skill. 

 

I've prepped and painted boats that originally had similar symptoms. The effect could go all the wall back through the layers, and even to the steel. This may be more characteristic of single part paints. Two pack could resist the backward effect. 

 

 

 

Edited by Higgs
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