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C&RT say don't empty your compost toilet in our bins.


Alan de Enfield

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35 minutes ago, Slow and Steady said:

it's not even remotely green.

 

I disagree. It IS only remotely green.

 

 

Even so, I've awarded you a greenie...

 

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22 minutes ago, Goliath said:

I like the coffee and them skinny chips. 
Won’t have any other stuff.
But it’s been such a long time since I last went in one, that when I did I didn’t understand all the screens and couldn’t be arsed to work out the ordering system, so left. 

 

Me too, if they want to make it difficult to place an order then my custom will go elsewhere. Same the last time I looked at Spoons, required a smartphone and their app to place an order. No doubt so they can flood you with spam.

Edited by Tony Brooks
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How about peelings and waste food?

Do people compost them?

 

If it’s cooked or raw meat the fish get it. 
If it’s onion skin, banana peel etc the hedge row gets it ( only if I’m well countryfide, not someone’s garden hedge).

 

 

  • Greenie 2
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53 minutes ago, Goliath said:


But it’s been such a long time since I last went in one, that when I did I didn’t understand all the screens and couldn’t be arsed to work out the ordering system, so left. 

I avoid those things, just like self checkouts 

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2 minutes ago, Goliath said:

If it’s onion skin, banana peel etc the hedge row gets it ( only if I’m well countryfide, not someone’s garden hedge).

Banana skin is a big no-no. It takes ages to decompose and is not an natural part of our environment. 

 

My wife says this thread is like Japanese Knotweed, it never goes away 😀

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35 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

 

Me too, if they want to make it difficult to place an order then my custom will go elsewhere. Same the last time I looked at Spoons, required a smartphone and their app to place an order. No doubt so they can flood you with spam.

Worse Barcode Scanner app on Google Play infects 10 million users with one update | Malwarebytes Labs

4 minutes ago, jpcdriver said:

Banana skin is a big no-no. It takes ages to decompose and is not an natural part of our environment. 

 

Maybe we shouldn't be throwing it away Can You Eat Banana Peels? (healthline.com)

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1 hour ago, Goliath said:

I like the coffee and them skinny chips. 
Won’t have any other stuff.
But it’s been such a long time since I last went in one, that when I did I didn’t understand all the screens and couldn’t be arsed to work out the ordering system, so left. 

I stood and looked helpless and a nice young girl, staff, came and showed me how, ie did it for me,,.  :)

 

 

Edited by LadyG
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25 minutes ago, jpcdriver said:

Banana skin is a big no-no. It takes ages to decompose and is not an natural part of our environment. 

 

My wife says this thread is like Japanese Knotweed, it never goes away 😀


I guess a squirrel 🐿 could slip on one too. 
 

I didn’t realise that about banana skins. Maybe I’ll start incinerating them on my stove. 
 

 

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4 minutes ago, Goliath said:


I guess a squirrel 🐿 could slip on one too. 
 

I didn’t realise that about banana skins. Maybe I’ll start incinerating them on my stove. 
 

 

There was a story when I was at school in the 1960's that if you dried banana skins you could then smoke them and get high🤭

 

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25 minutes ago, LadyG said:

I stood and looked helpless and a nice young girl, staff, came and showed me how, ie did it for me,,.  :)

 

 

I hope you gave her your credit card and told her the number 😈

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14 minutes ago, Loddon said:

There was a story when I was at school in the 1960's that if you dried banana skins you could then smoke them and get high🤭

 

Same here, in 70’s/80’s. 
I was daft enough to try it and can say….it don’t work. 😳

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1 hour ago, MtB said:

 

I disagree. It IS only remotely green.

 

 

Even so, I've awarded you a greenie...

 

Double bagging with plastic bags? Yep, really green. OK it has the potential to be a great solution but the reality is far from it, it's driven by laziness at this point by people who CBA to empty their toilets.

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4 hours ago, Bargebuilder said:

They describe it as an 'energy recovery facility' not an energy consuming facility.

But then they would wouldn't they. Nobody wants a rubbish incinerator in their vicinity so it has to be given a more positive sounding name, regardless of what the net energy balance actually is.

  • Greenie 1
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20 minutes ago, David Mack said:

But then they would wouldn't they. Nobody wants a rubbish incinerator in their vicinity so it has to be given a more positive sounding name, regardless of what the net energy balance actually is.

This is an extract from the Viridor website, the people who run the plants:

 

"Energy recovery facilities use a technology that sees waste burned at high temperatures under carefully controlled conditions. The process is extremely sufficient, robust and safe. Emissions are treated to meet required standards under the stringent European Industrial Emissions Directive, which is strictly enforced and monitored by the Environment Agency.
The electricity that ERFs produce is fed into the National Grid and the heat can be utilised locally, presenting opportunities for additional commercial development and improving resource efficiency."

 

Perhaps this isn't such a bad way to process non-recyclable waste after all.

  • Greenie 1
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9 minutes ago, Bargebuilder said:

This is an extract from the Viridor website, the people who run the plants:

 

"Energy recovery facilities use a technology that sees waste burned at high temperatures under carefully controlled conditions. The process is extremely sufficient, robust and safe. Emissions are treated to meet required standards under the stringent European Industrial Emissions Directive, which is strictly enforced and monitored by the Environment Agency.
The electricity that ERFs produce is fed into the National Grid and the heat can be utilised locally, presenting opportunities for additional commercial development and improving resource efficiency."

 

Perhaps this isn't such a bad way to process non-recyclable waste after all.

On another thread we alluded to the unanticipated consequences of what at first seeds a good idea. When we were still in Cornwall, a large waste incinerator came on stream  and soon after came the push for as much recycling as possible. This quickly brought the incinerator and its  commercial viability into question. With the recycling separated, the remaining waste had very much less calorific content and removed the incentive for the operator. Not sure how it has panned out.

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41 minutes ago, Bargebuilder said:

This is an extract from the Viridor website, the people who run the plants:

 

"Energy recovery facilities use a technology that sees waste burned at high temperatures under carefully controlled conditions. The process is extremely sufficient, robust and safe. Emissions are treated to meet required standards under the stringent European Industrial Emissions Directive, which is strictly enforced and monitored by the Environment Agency.
The electricity that ERFs produce is fed into the National Grid and the heat can be utilised locally, presenting opportunities for additional commercial development and improving resource efficiency."

 

Perhaps this isn't such a bad way to process non-recyclable waste after all.

 

I hope it is a typo but seeing how the corporates like to greenwash their image I am not sure it is - anyone else noticed " the process is extremely SUFFICIENT." I do hope they mean efficient.

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9 hours ago, MtB said:

 

 

I suspect the 'street waste' incineration process is a massive user of energy, not a producer.

Sorry Mike we have a big incinerator in Sheffield makes energy not uses it,

5 hours ago, jpcdriver said:

Banana skin is a big no-no. It takes ages to decompose and is not an natural part of our environment. 

 

My wife says this thread is like Japanese Knotweed, it never goes away 😀

Goes in my compost along with anything else thats veg waste

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7 hours ago, Slow and Steady said:

It's hard not to draw the conclusion that composting separating toilet owners are simply lazy and cling to the green angle to obfuscate. Anyone prepared to dump their shite in public bins and their pee in the hedge or the canal should consider what a world we'd live in if everyone did that. Lazy and selfish, it only works if hardly anyone does it.

Apologies to the one in a hundred who actually compost and take their pee to the Elsan, but come on - if you do that you might as well take a cassette the the elsan.

It's notable how many of the shite in the bin / pee in the hedge crowd still insist on describing their toilet as composting - you're fooling nobody. Dumping your excrement is Pre-Victorian and went out of fashion due to the associated diseases like cholera - it's backward third world behaviour, it's not even remotely green.

 

My poo bin can last up to 3 months, the wee is done weekly added to the IBC at the allotment where its mixes with rainwater, we water the allotment with it as its a valuable resource same as the poo when its composted

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5 hours ago, Mike Todd said:

On another thread we alluded to the unanticipated consequences of what at first seeds a good idea. When we were still in Cornwall, a large waste incinerator came on stream  and soon after came the push for as much recycling as possible. This quickly brought the incinerator and its  commercial viability into question. With the recycling separated, the remaining waste had very much less calorific content and removed the incentive for the operator. Not sure how it has panned out.

 

Pre-Covid, Private Eye reported a similar situation with a Northern local authority that had contracted with a power generation company to supply them with enough  incineratable rubbish for them to generate at least a certain amount of electricity. Before making this agreement they had had an excellent record in the  proportion of waste recycled. It was found that the residual waste had too low a calorific value for them to meet their contractual obligations, so they had to make up the shortfall using some of the plastic that they used to recycle.

 

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On 18/05/2022 at 14:24, Arthur Marshall said:

It's bad enough dog walkers now wanting someone else to deal with the excrement their pets produce. I reckon every dog owner ought to spend one month a year emptying dogwaste bins full time.

But now you want some other poor sod to get rid of your personal  crap too. Funny how it's always someone else who has to clear up the mess of the ecologically right on...

Isn't that what everyone does when they empty an elsan, uses a pump out machine or simply flushes a toilet in a house?

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3 minutes ago, Alway Swilby said:

Isn't that what everyone does when they empty an elsan, uses a pump out machine or simply flushes a toilet in a house?

Yes,  of course, but the infrastructure is there and is proven technology, and doesn't rely on a bloke in a truck lifting up a truly horrible lid filled with decomposing bags of nastiness.

Expecting someone else to deal with your dog's waste on a bulk basis seems to me to be dodging your personal responsibility for its characteristics and behaviour. And, as we all well know, dog owners are not generally given to behaving responsibly - every street I've lived in has suffered from noisy dogs and trees and fences are littered with poo bags. If the dog waste bin is full, they don't carry it to the next, they dump it on the path.

I realise it's always someone else's dog, never the responsible owner in front of one, but there are a hell of a lot of someone elses.

For the same reason, I'd expect composting loo owners (apart from Peterboat) to behave as badly. I'm just extrapolating from the evidence. 

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20 minutes ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Yes,  of course, but the infrastructure is there and is proven technology, and doesn't rely on a bloke in a truck lifting up a truly horrible lid filled with decomposing bags of nastiness.

Expecting someone else to deal with your dog's waste on a bulk basis seems to me to be dodging your personal responsibility for its characteristics and behaviour. And, as we all well know, dog owners are not generally given to behaving responsibly - every street I've lived in has suffered from noisy dogs and trees and fences are littered with poo bags. If the dog waste bin is full, they don't carry it to the next, they dump it on the path.

I realise it's always someone else's dog, never the responsible owner in front of one, but there are a hell of a lot of someone elses.

For the same reason, I'd expect composting loo owners (apart from Peterboat) to behave as badly. I'm just extrapolating from the evidence. 

But energy recovery facilities do already exist, street waste and dog waste bins are already in place, trucks and operatives are already out there collecting the mixed waste and district councils are encouraging people to use them. Councils are equally keen that dog waste should be bagged and placed in household waste bins alongside soiled nappies etc.

 

You don't paint a very nice picture of where you live and although in recent years I've lived just south of London, to the east of London and down in the West Country, I've never witnessed the disgusting conditions you describe.

 

Back in the 70s and earlier, the grass verges were littered with dog poo and it wasn't unusual to pick it up on your shoe and carry that horrible smell with you until you could clean them properly, but dog fouling has been barely a problem at all wherever I've lived, chiefly through education of dog owners and the provision of dog waste bins. 

 

I don't see using a facility provided for the purpose as dodging ones personal responsibility, on the contrary, many would thank users of dog bins for actually being responsible.  

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