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We're pondering the idea of removing the suicide seats from our newish-to-us boat. We know not to use them for sitting on whilst steering, and they're definitely a hindrance to us when jumping on and off the boat with a centre line whilst mooring etc. But we're not sure if we'd miss them as a sort of handrail, something to grab onto and the fact they provide a bit of protection from falling off the back of the boat. What's everyone's opinion? 

 

Also, if we do decide to remove them, what's the best way to fill in the bolt holes?    

Edited by JoshS
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2 minutes ago, JoshS said:

https://i.imgur.com/c3wLWIf.jpg

 

We're pondering the idea of removing the suicide seats from our newish-to-us boat. We know not to use them for sitting on whilst steering, and they're definitely a hindrance to us when jumping on and off the boat with a centre line whilst mooring etc. But we're not sure if we'd miss them as a sort of handrail, something to grab onto and the fact they provide a bit of protection from falling off the back of the boat. What's everyone's opinion? 

 

Also, if we do decide to remove them, what's the best way to fill in the bolt holes?    

 

We kept ours. We just remembered not to sit on them when cruising. We often sat on them on a warm summers evening. (remember those??)

  • Greenie 1
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as a compromise you could remove the most forward pole from each seat and make new tops so more sort of T shaped than current Π shape, that would give you better entry/exit and still leave a seat.

  • Greenie 1
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4 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

as a compromise you could remove the most forward pole from each seat and make new tops so more sort of T shaped than current Π shape, that would give you better entry/exit and still leave a seat.

That's a cool idea! Will definitely give this some thought! 

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Looking again at them the issue does seem to be the positioning of them.

 

Ours were further around the stern and had a bigger gap between them and the cabin back.

 

But if you were going to move them you might as well just get rid if they concern you.

IMG_0692.JPG

Edited by The Happy Nomad
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I'd have got my hacksaw out by now.

 

 

However, since our current boat has a cruiser stern I may be less qualified to comment than some. Our first boat was a trad and had no obstructions around the stern deck at all. .

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Ive got something similar and I don't find they get in the way. Occasionally I might use them as I step on to the stern. I would feel a bit more vulnerable if I removed them. I wouldn't put them on, but someone did, as seats they are useless.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by LadyG
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as someone pointed out recently, they are only potentially hazardous when reversing.  If the rudder is properly proportioned ahead and behind the rudder stock there should be no reason why the tiller could swing round while travelling forwards.  Common sense should be used, and possibly a discreet sign identifying the potential hazard could be provided to ensure novices are properly warned.

 

has anyone ever had a tiller swing out of control while moving forwards?

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

as someone pointed out recently, they are only potentially hazardous when reversing.

The chap who died in Harecastle Tunnel a couple of years ago was photographed steering while sitting on his suicide seat.

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2 minutes ago, David Mack said:

The chap who died in Harecastle Tunnel a couple of years ago was photographed steering while sitting on his suicide seat.

err  .................  if he hit his head on the roof of the tunnel then the common sense approach applies.

Just now, Murflynn said:

err  .................  if he hit his head on the roof of the tunnel then the common sense approach applies ......  he could equally have been sitting on the cabin.

 

damn, can't find the edit function !

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17 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

has anyone ever had a tiller swing out of control while moving forwards?

 

Mine has a terrible habit of doing that when someone is moored up having a picnic on a lock landing ...

  • Haha 1
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I was going to remove them on Ripple, then I saw that my parents steadied themselves  getting on and off when moored using the seats as a handrail

 

So I settled for a rule of no one sitting on them when under way

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Slightly off topic. Are either of these two your diesel tank fillers?

 

If so I believe they should have collar around them to stop diesel being spilled on the deck and possibly entering the boat.

 

fuel filling systems | Boat Safety Scheme | Go Boating - Stay Safe

 

FAQ TN 0X1 (boatsafetyscheme.org)

 

May be a BSS fail?

I stand correction.

FILLERS.JPG

 

IMGP4054.JPG

Edited by Ray T
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40 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Slightly off topic. Are either of these two your diesel tank fillers?

 

If so I believe they should have collar around them to stop diesel being spilled on the deck and possibly entering the boat.

 

fuel filling systems | Boat Safety Scheme | Go Boating - Stay Safe

 

FAQ TN 0X1 (boatsafetyscheme.org)

 

May be a BSS fail?

I stand correction.

FILLERS.JPG

 

IMGP4054.JPG

 

The BSS says:

Fuel overflowing from filling points must be prevented from
entering any part of the interior of the vessel.
Accordingly, fuel filling points must be positioned so that...
 the camber or configuration of the deck; or,
 a coaming; or,
 a diverter arrangement;
...causes any overflow to discharge overboard;

 

On my boat, the filling point is incorporated in to one of the two towing/mooring dollies. There is no coaming around it, but the design is such that any spillage will be confined to the deck, with an upstand that prevents it reaching the engine cover, so is covered by "the camber, or configuration of the deck". The top picture looks similar in construction to mine, the upstand by the doors and the scupper each side will send any excess diesel overboard. On your lower picture, I can see a couple of what look like hinges for a lifting panel. As a result, that boat needs the coaming around the filler to prevent any spills going there. BSS isn't concerned about people slipping over on a diesel spill on the deck.

Jen

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Yep, there is a decent lip up to the stern doors and the recessed part of the deck is cambered and without an inspection hatch (which makes the weed hatch a hilarious contortionist act to access but with the benefit of a basically rust free engine bay). 

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2 minutes ago, JoshS said:

They're bolted to the hull so perhaps this is famous last words but I'm hopeful I can just unscrew them! 😂

An angle grinder is quicker than a wrench :)

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1 hour ago, David Mack said:

And if you cut through the bolts, and they are rusted in place, then you won't need anything to fill the hole.

 

If you do need to fill anything then get some proper filler like International Watertite. Don't use car body filler crap  because decks are high traffic areas.

 

https://www.google.com/shopping/product/5061451882922833643?q=international+watertite&tbs=vw:l,ss:44&sxsrf=ALeKk03NiJ6Ou4-h6IaLjgJzVCEc8JSX9A:1611172569975&prds=num:1,of:1,epd:4987797301255306819,prmr:1,cs:1

2 minutes ago, blackrose said:

 

 

Edited by blackrose
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If you are lucky, then the bolt holes in to the deck will be tapped, rather than drilled to clear the bolts. In which case, a bit of thread lock on the bolts, grind off flush with the deck and paint. If there is access to the underside, then a nut and washer on each side will lock the stud in place.

Jen

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