Jump to content

Water tank re-paint time!


Featured Posts

Anyone have the answer as to which is the best product to use on our water tank after preparing the surface? Neutrarust 661, Fertan and Vactan have been suggested but I would love to hear of any tried and tested ( and successful) projects.

Many thanks

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, sue.stew said:

Anyone have the answer as to which is the best product to use on our water tank after preparing the surface? Neutrarust 661, Fertan and Vactan have been suggested but I would love to hear of any tried and tested ( and successful) projects.

Many thanks

 

I have no experience of Neutrarust, but of the other two, Vactan is the cleaner option. Fertan, in my experience, needs a lot of rinsing. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much help but, I used Vactan for the first time last September, I had to leave it a few weeks before blacking due to Covid restrictions.

Then a couple of weeks between each blacking coat, again Covid.

Because the boat has been winterised I haven't had chance to fill the tank.

Picture is about 1/2 hour after applying the Vactan.

Don't forget to do the underside of the foredeck. Condensation often gathers there and can lead to rust.

When I eventually get back to the boat I have some Aqua Clean - Puriclean to flush through the system including the calorifier.

 

Water Purification - Aqua Clean - Puriclean | Leisureshopdirect

Puriclean 400g Tub - Water tank Cleaner

 

IMGP4936.JPG

Edited by Ray T
Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of being Captain Obvious, I presume that you are applying some special tank-paint after the rust-treatment? I guess that  which ever product that is will dictate what to use underneath it. The video I've seen showed a bitumenous coating bit I am sure that there are others as tanks are often lined and painted in industry. (not to mention classic motorcycles, but not usually for drinking water!)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, MartinW said:

At the risk of being Captain Obvious, I presume that you are applying some special tank-paint after the rust-treatment? I guess that  which ever product that is will dictate what to use underneath it. The video I've seen showed a bitumenous coating bit I am sure that there are others as tanks are often lined and painted in industry. (not to mention classic motorcycles, but not usually for drinking water!)

 

 

 

Bitumen coatings are allowed, but aren't up to the standards of today, for potable water. Older boats will have a bitumen coating and can continue to use them. I've recently cleaned off all the bitumen in my water tank and don't intend using bitumen again. There are epoxy coatings that can be used, but to be effective, it is necessary to have the steel sand/shot blasted to a suitable degree. I'm still pondering the epoxy route. 

 

 

Edited by Higgs
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the useful info. I would like to avoid going down the bitumen route. We emptied the tank just before christmas, cleaned it out ready to tackle in the spring.  Last time , we had a marina sort it but the paint only lasted a year. If you have any paint recommendations that would be suitable please post them, thanks all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sue.stew said:

Anyone have the answer as to which is the best product to use on our water tank after preparing the surface? Neutrarust 661, Fertan and Vactan have been suggested but I would love to hear of any tried and tested ( and successful) projects.

Many thanks

 

 

 

The best treatment will be several coats of water potable epoxy. Trouble is it's only available in  minimum15 litre quantities and it's quite expensive. Epoxies are more technical paints than those used by the average narrowboater. They have to be mixed properly in the correct quantites, and overcoated according to min/max overcoating times based on temperature. It's perfectly possible for an amateur to use epoxies but you must read the data sheets - you can't just slap them on.

 

Tankguard DW - SML Protective Coatings

 

The other issue is that like most epoxy paints you have to prep the steel to a standard of Sa 2.5. You can do it without blast cleaning using an angle grinder and wire wheels, etc, but it's hard work.

Sa 2½ Very thorough blast cleaning. Mill scale, rust and foreign matter shall be removed to the extent that the only traces remaining are slight stains in the forms of spots or stripes. Finally, the surface is cleaned with a vacuum cleaner, clean dry compressed air or a clean brush.

 

Edit: The answer to the next question is no. You don't use Vactan, etc, under epoxy. 

Edited by blackrose
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

@blackrose

 

Have you used the Jotun Tankguard epoxy on your tank? I’m interested to find someone who’s got some real world experience of applying it to wire brushed/sanded steel. I emailed Jotun about this and they said: (I also asked if you could undercoat with Jotamastic 90 which is waaaay more surface tolerant and can be applied to manually prepared surfaces)

 

We've never tested Tankguard DW onto manually prepared surfaces, but as you know the quality of surface preparation has a direct influence on the expected lifespan of the coating.  There's no figure we can give for reduction of lifespan, all we can say is that the expected lifespan will be significantly reduced.

As for the Jotamastic 90 being used as a primer and taking advantage of its surface tolerance, this would not be recommended.   

When coating tanks, especially drinking water tanks, it is of paramount importance to observe correct surface preparation and coating application.”


Obviously they just re-said what it says in the Tankguard application guide. Proper surface prep is obviously required to get the maximum life from the coating but I wonder, as long as any residual coating has been fully cleaned off the tank, how long the epoxy would last. Even if it’s 5 or 6 years (??) As opposed then it’s probably worth it. Considering it’s safer than bitumen. 
 

You can also get the ‘Rylards’ (same as Epicol SF) version which per litre is about the same price as Jotun but you can get it in 4.5l size which costs about £100. 
 

https://www.boatpaint.co.uk/acatalog/Spencer-Coatings-Epicol--Water-Tank-Coating-.html
 

https://www.promain.co.uk/hygiene-paint-antibacterial-paint/potable-paints/axalta-epicol-sf-solvent-free-epoxy.html
 

I think the main thing to consider would be making sure it’s warm enough (ideally 15+ degrees!) and no condensation/dew forms in the tank whilst the coating is curing. This would probably be possible to do on a boat in the water in the middle of summer. Or if you’ve got shorepower you could could dangle a heater in there overnight... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information.  I'm considering the Rylards option at the moment. Think it's worth paying the extra. If it doesn't work out will definitely look into a replacement plastic tank.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.