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Forgotten canal side business and trade


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On 24/11/2020 at 08:33, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Drug smuggling around the country was a major source of income for working boatpersons. It supplemented the miniscule wages they received for legal cargo and was carried out with the knowledge and tacit approval of the canal management, provided they received their kick backs and could maintain plausible deniability. Purple Ore, Spelter Dross, Basic Slag, Coke Dust and Waste Acid were all euphemisms for various illegal drugs of the time.

Working boat trade only continued in to the '60's with the help of the money that could be made this way.

 

Jen 😀

As seen in Peaky Blinders 😀

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41 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I use to get slivers in my fingers as a kid, more widely known as splinters

plus all the ones listed above

And still in common use today in wooden sailing boat circles  

Worked in the North East (North Shields) for several months and our boss hired some locals off the fishing. Really broad Geordie accents. Splinters were 'spickles', Sparrows were 'spuggies', ciggies were 'tabs'. Some of the guys were met by their wives after work. I'd seen prettier pit ponies. Tough didn't describe them. And woe betide you on a Saturday night round the pubs! Great people though.

  • Greenie 1
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12 minutes ago, Derek R. said:

Worked in the North East (North Shields) for several months and our boss hired some locals off the fishing. Really broad Geordie accents. Splinters were 'spickles', Sparrows were 'spuggies', ciggies were 'tabs'. Some of the guys were met by their wives after work. I'd seen prettier pit ponies. Tough didn't describe them. And woe betide you on a Saturday night round the pubs! Great people though.

Interesting words. I still refer to sparrows as "spadgers", which is what my (Derbyshire) parents called them. The term "tab" is, I think, more widespread, though less common now.

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1 hour ago, Derek R. said:

Worked in the North East (North Shields) for several months and our boss hired some locals off the fishing. Really broad Geordie accents. Splinters were 'spickles', Sparrows were 'spuggies', ciggies were 'tabs'. Some of the guys were met by their wives after work. I'd seen prettier pit ponies. Tough didn't describe them. And woe betide you on a Saturday night round the pubs! Great people though.

They have their own language, we use to get a lot of blasters, painters and scaffolders from there working offshore 

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A copy invoice from Mansley's at Leigh for rope for L&LC boats, and a view inside Edenfield ropewalk where I used to buy cotton rope. They would vary the amount and style of twist, making it harder or softer, depending upon what you were going to use the rope for.

1948-9-3 ropes.JPG

8.jpg

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