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Tessy

Blacking in the water!

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I wouldn't mind touching up the waterline of the hull. I've read that anti-corrosion paints for the hull have been developed in recent years that can be applied under water! Is there any truth to this?

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You can touch up the water line with ordinary blacking  whilst the boat is afloat.

 

You need a dinghy or similar and a warm dry sunny day

 

Knock a stout stake in.  Use a spanish windlass between the base of the stake and stake and the roof ring or handrail to lean the boat over so the outside waterline is out of the water.  Beware the contents of the Scotch cupboard, the crystal wine glasses etc. escaping at this point.

From dinghy clean the rust and weed off.

Allow waterline to dry.

Paint.

 

Turn round and repeat.

 

It is possible to lean the boat outwards by passing a rope under it, but that gets quite complicated.

 

Some narrow locks are well suited to this and avoid the need for a dinghy.  😈

N

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Good grief a "spanish  windlass"? What era do you live in? Use one of these. Dirt cheap if you can find the right place. My two cost a tenner each in Aldi.

98107.jpg

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There is of course paint which can be applied in the rain.  Known to the Trade as Council Paint and used by painting contractors for many years in the external redecorating of civic buildings and other Council owned property.

Range of colours is very limited, usually only readily available in white.

 

N

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2 hours ago, BEngo said:

You can touch up the water line with ordinary blacking  whilst the boat is afloat.

 

You need a dinghy or similar and a warm dry sunny day

 

Knock a stout stake in.  Use a spanish windlass between the base of the stake and stake and the roof ring or handrail to lean the boat over so the outside waterline is out of the water.  Beware the contents of the Scotch cupboard, the crystal wine glasses etc. escaping at this point.

From dinghy clean the rust and weed off.

Allow waterline to dry.

Paint.

 

Turn round and repeat.

 

It is possible to lean the boat outwards by passing a rope under it, but that gets quite complicated.

 

Some narrow locks are well suited to this and avoid the need for a dinghy.  😈

N

i basically did this a few years ago after a diesel spill had softened the blacking along the waterline, so didn't have to tilt the boat much.  I reckon it saved me a year on time to next blacking.

 

I know someone who does this every couple of years on a 30ft boat, and it is the only blacking his boat gets!

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There is always the 'other' method that was tried in August (in Nottingham) by a 'cost sensitive boater'.

 

Go into the lock, tie the boat tightly onto the bollards, open the bottom paddles, wait until the bottom of the boat is clear of the water, watch the lock walls collapse.

 

 

 

 

MwadowLaneLock

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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Moor up in one of the pounds at Wolverhampton, sooner or  later somebody will drain the pound and then you can just walk round the boat with a roller, voila. 

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2 hours ago, BEngo said:

There is of course paint which can be applied in the rain.  Known to the Trade as Council Paint and used by painting contractors for many years in the external redecorating of civic buildings and other Council owned property.

Range of colours is very limited, usually only readily available in white.

 

N

I have seen "painters" with a scraper in one hand and a brush in the other removing the snow and ice from the window frame to paint it.

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On 11/11/2020 at 09:19, pete.i said:

Good grief a "spanish  windlass"? What era do you live in? Use one of these. Dirt cheap if you can find the right place. My two cost a tenner each in Aldi.

98107.jpg

I think that you're overcomplicating matters. I've recently done mine  by using some sacks of coal laid on the edge of the roof. Half a dozen was enough for a 70 foot boat.

Edited by monkeyhanger
Added info.

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2 hours ago, monkeyhanger said:

I think that you're overcomplicating matters. I've recently done mine  by using some sacks of coal laid on the edge of the roof. Half a dozen was enough for a 70 foot boat.

When I moored on the Engine Arm, Napton one of the boaters there did it with a Spanish Windlass across the arm and painted from the other bank

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5 hours ago, monkeyhanger said:

I think that you're overcomplicating matters. I've recently done mine  by using some sacks of coal laid on the edge of the roof. Half a dozen was enough for a 70 foot boat.

A darn site safer than a cheap Chinese Tirfor too I suspect! 

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52 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

A darn site safer than a cheap Chinese Tirfor too I suspect! 

I thought a Tirfor was a very heavy duty, continuous wire feed ?

 

(those shown are just fixed length pullers for tensioning wire fencing etc)

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I dont know of any paint that can be applied underwater on a boat to protect against corrosion.

 

Note all the responses above about heeling the boat over to get at a 'dry' waterline - following from Bengo's original post. Bengo's key statement might get overlooked - It works on a warm, dry sunny day! Dont try it until next May. It will be too cold.

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I thought a Tirfor was a very heavy duty, continuous wire feed ?

 

(those shown are just fixed length pullers for tensioning wire fencing etc)

You may well be right Alan. I missed the word knock off, but perhaps it even that would have been excess credit! 

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14 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I thought a Tirfor was a very heavy duty, continuous wire feed ?

 

(those shown are just fixed length pullers for tensioning wire fencing etc)

Yup, tirfor is a brand of continuous wire feed winch, the one shown isn't a tirfor type, they have there uses but a tirfor it's not :)

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