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9 hours ago, matty40s said:

 although even this is slightly skewed by removing the Wolfhamcote loop

Does the bridge numbering really predate Telford's shortening of the Ofxord north of Napton?

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spacer.pngUnique sign.

 

Is the pictogram awry by ninety degrees?

 

Or do boaters chop right to left and slightly up?

 

1243566424_D_30(71a).jpg.213ca3bac6bdc1171c35da2100527465.jpg

Edited by PeterScott
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15 hours ago, Heartland said:

Another related question, as bit remained unconnected, is was there separate numbering or naming for

(1) Leeds - westward

(2) Liverpool- eastward

(3) Douglas Navigation

(4) Lancaster Canal later absorbed into L & L

 

And my favourite conundrum, the lock at Leeds (under the station) and the section of navigation on the Aire above the weir.

As I have written previously, the L&LC did not use a consecutive numbering system. Locks built before 1790 had a name, with riser locks also having a number. From 1790, the locks tended to be in flights which were named by location and then numbered. The Yorkshire length of the canal was from Leeds to the top of Johnsons Hillock, and the Lancashire end from the top of Wigan to Liverpool. The Lancaster structures were included in the L&LC system from 1864. The Douglas had two lines, the original navigation, from Dean to Wigan surviving until the canal was built to Wigan in 1781, with the lock from the canal into the river at Dean surviving until around 1900. When the Rufford branch was built in 1780, it used a canal section of the old navigation from Rufford to Sollom. Bridges and locks were all named. The lock into the Aire which was under Leeds station was built by the canal to protect its land when the railway was built, and the canal company had no right of navigation upwards from River Lock, in fact they may not have had the necessary authority to build it in the first place. The river was only used to serve factories on Whitehall Road, and the canal company refused to compensate boat owners for any damage to craft which happened on this stretch of the river. They were responsible for the river between River Lock and Leeds Bridge, but did attempt to get out of that at one time.

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1 hour ago, happynomad said:

21297EDB-0DFB-48FA-857A-5DFCD0FF8CE2.png.aac4908ea62208f5db7dfe203fe3a4e1.png

"Keep off the grass - or I'll scratch your paint"

A warning with some sharp bits - highly effective, I'd say

 

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1 hour ago, happynomad said:

21297EDB-0DFB-48FA-857A-5DFCD0FF8CE2.png.aac4908ea62208f5db7dfe203fe3a4e1.png

It could be improved with an icon of a dog and saying "toilet"

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10 minutes ago, Tam & Di said:

It could be improved with an icon of a dog and saying "toilet"

It looks as if there is a part used toilet roll there (bet that's not still there if we get back into full lock-down)

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Taken 20 minutes ago, although I've known the location for many years

 

Perhaps pupils at Monkton School aren't that bright after all

20201011_120106.jpg

Edited by magpie patrick

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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Not so much a 'silly sign' but a good warning sign :

 

North of Lincoln (dirty Bu***rs)

 

 

 

 

Spital in the street.jpg

In the Chesterfield area there's a Spital Hill and a Deepsick Lane. Wellingtons should be worn.

Edited by Athy

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Not so much a 'silly sign' but a good warning sign :

 

North of Lincoln (dirty Bu***rs)

 

 

 

 

Spital in the street.jpg

There'a an area of Windsor called Spital, not unsurprisingly near the hospital.

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20 minutes ago, Quattrodave said:

IIRC spital means 'hospital'...

Don't shoot me down if I'm wrong tho... 🙄

 

3 minutes ago, buccaneer66 said:

There'a an area of Windsor called Spital, not unsurprisingly near the hospital.

 

There is a Spitalgate in Grantham which was home to an RFC (and subsequently an RAF) airfield.

 

 

spital (plural spitals) (historical)

A charitable house to receive and care for sick people, later distinguished from a hospital as being especially for those of a low class or meagre financial means.

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On 07/10/2020 at 19:40, David Mack said:

Claughton+Lancs.+March+2013+comp.jpg

The Far Tottering & Oyster Creek miniature railway designed by Rowland Emett for the 1951 Festival of Britain had what was supposed to be a spoof sign sayng "Persons throwing stones at this sign will be prosecuted" . Interesting to see it was not so far fetched after all! 

 

In the 1960's, the destination board on the buses of one of Carfiff's bus routes said ROATH DOCK SPLOTT. Spott is the name of an eastern suburb, short for Splottlands, originally Hospital Lands.

Edited by Ronaldo47
Typo

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16 minutes ago, Ronaldo47 said:

 

 

In the 1960's, the destination board on the buses of one of Carfiff's bus routes said ROATH DOCK SPLOTT. Spott is the name of an eastern suburb, short for Splottlands, originally Hospital Lands.

I don't know Carfiff, but I do remember seeing Birmingham 'buses bearing the destination "Rubery" - an early bendy 'bus, perhaps?

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20 minutes ago, Ronaldo47 said:

The Far Tottering & Oyster Creek miniature railway designed by Rowland Emett for the 1951 Festival of Britain had what was supposed to be a spoof sign sayng "Persons throwing stones at this sign will be prosecuted" . Interesting to see it was not so far fetched after all! 

 

In the 1960's, the destination board on the buses of one of Carfiff's bus routes said ROATH DOCK SPLOTT. Spott is the name of an eastern suburb, short for Splottlands, originally Hospital Lands.

I lived briefly in Splottland when studying at Cyncoyd. 
Don’t ask where, I’ve long forgotten. 
Loved the name ‘Splott’. 

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1 hour ago, Ronaldo47 said:

In the 1960's, the destination board on the buses of one of Carfiff's bus routes said ROATH DOCK SPLOTT. Spott is the name of an eastern suburb, short for Splottlands, originally Hospital Lands.

I lived in Cardiff for 22 years and I never knew that

 

Estate agents took to calling it "Lower Roath" for a while!

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12 minutes ago, magpie patrick said:

I lived in Cardiff for 22 years and I never knew that

 

Estate agents took to calling it "Lower Roath" for a while!

It does sound better. When I taught in London, some of my pupils lived in "Temple Fortune" - a name made up, as I recall, by estate agents to attract people who were upwardly mobile, but who didn't want "Cricklewood" in their addresses.

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I turned right once, never again.

Two minutes later I met myself going the other way.

thumbnail_IMG_20201011_141141.jpg

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49 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

I turned right once, never again.

Two minutes later I met myself going the other way.

thumbnail_IMG_20201011_141141.jpg

I did wonder once why there are so many towns in Germany called Umleitung.

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50 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

I turned right once, never again.

Two minutes later I met myself going the other way.

thumbnail_IMG_20201011_141141.jpg

I didn't get a photo, but years ago when we got lost in Tours we crossed a river bridge to see two signs on the wall facing us: "Toutes directions" (right) and "Autres directions" (left).

 

Since we were trying to escape from Tours we went right, obviously 😉

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