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I have done a search but not able to find answers, we are going to get a 55ft shell made but of course the first part is to find where we can keep her to do the fit out. 

We are trying to find somewhere as near to the southwest as possible, but beggers can't be choosers so we are open to suggestions we also would ideally be able to live on site. Any suggestions would be great fully received. Thanks in advance. 

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there must be abandoned farms in the area where you could rent a space in the yard and possible the farmhouse or a caravan space.

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Thanks for your response, I was thinking more on the lines of a canal side boatyard where she could be easily launched. 

Regards. 

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How big is your garden? A neighbour of ours fitted out his narrowboat over a couple of years in his back garden.  It did involve a very large crane to lift it over the house twice though (no access to the rear).

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4 minutes ago, WotEver said:

How big is your garden? A neighbour of ours fitted out his narrowboat over a couple of years in his back garden.  It did involve a very large crane to lift it over the house twice though (no access to the rear).

We live on a 45 ft sailing boat at the moment, but my garden would be my first choice as it would be free. 

Regards Rachel 

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3 minutes ago, Ironmaiden said:

We live on a 45 ft sailing boat at the moment, but my garden would be my first choice as it would be free. 

Regards Rachel 

You have a garden on you sailing yacht - Wow !!!

  • Haha 1

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2 hours ago, Ironmaiden said:

Thanks for your response, I was thinking more on the lines of a canal side boatyard where she could be easily launched. 

Regards. 

I fitted mine on a bit of land in Suffolk and launched at Calcutt. Its going to have to go on a lorry when its built so have it delivered to where it suits you.

1 hour ago, WotEver said:

How big is your garden? A neighbour of ours fitted out his narrowboat over a couple of years in his back garden.  It did involve a very large crane to lift it over the house twice though (no access to the rear).

 @wandering snail maybe you can advise

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Some time ago one of the mags had a piece about a chap who persuaded his mate, a farmer, to dig out a mooring on his land on the Tamar or tributary where the fellow proceeded to fit out his narrowboat. Getting it to the canals did involve sailing it to Plymouth, negotiations with the RN for access to a craning site. Maybe that mooring isavailable for a repeat.

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The closer you can get it to you the better - even if it involves additional transport cost - you will enjoy the process more and find it much easier to deal with esp deliveries and keeping on top of the process esp quick 1/2 jobs in an evening to maintain progress ie "this just needs another coat before I can move on" 

 

Have you decided on her beam yet 

 

Have fun we need pictures..........

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Yes we too used a crane to get our 70ft sailaway in to our back yard while we fitted her out behind the house. Tuckey did it for us after we prepared the land with some rather large railway sleepers and telegraph pole rollers. There was also a concrete pad for the crane to use. Got the photos somewhere of several villagers all pushing Snail's stern to try to get her further in to the space. It was a fun day for all! We had also an offer from a local farmer if getting it to the house wasn't possible.

Edited by wandering snail
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Did mine on the car park at Aynho wharf, there must be similar if you visit some boat yards.

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12 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

You have a garden on you sailing yacht - Wow !!!

I have the biggest garden in the world, ohh, it is the world. But alas its all sea water.. Should have said If I had a garden😊

  • Haha 1

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2 hours ago, wandering snail said:

We had also an offer from a local farmer if getting it to the house wasn't possible.

I think that most farmers could find a space to park a narrowboat if asked. 

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2 hours ago, WotEver said:

I think that most farmers could find a space to park a narrowboat if asked. 

providing rent was paid I expect.

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I know someone who fitted out on a large pond/small lake in Suffolk while living in a caravan beside it, that way he was able to get all the ballast right and even test the drive train. Poor chap past away a couple of years back and the boat sold

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13 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

providing rent was paid I expect.

Oh indeed. Farmers aren’t noted for their propensity to give stuff away ;)

Not even space. 

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I'd recommend fitting out in water rather than on hard standing, especially if ballast, engine and drive train are not already installed.

A hull doesn't always sit exactly the same way in the water as out of it.

I know land fitted engine/gearbox/reduction/prop shafts that were perfectly aligned on land but ended up wearing out bearings within a short time once under way.

I had a boat years back that jammed every door the moment it was on dock.

It only needs to flex a fraction.

 

 

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2 hours ago, zenataomm said:

I'd recommend fitting out in water rather than on hard standing, especially if ballast, engine and drive train are not already installed.

A hull doesn't always sit exactly the same way in the water as out of it.

I know land fitted engine/gearbox/reduction/prop shafts that were perfectly aligned on land but ended up wearing out bearings within a short time once under way.

I had a boat years back that jammed every door the moment it was on dock.

It only needs to flex a fraction.

 

 

except that spirit levels - the basic tool for all built in features - don't work in a floating boat.

 

I would recommend the exact opposite.

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42 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

except that spirit levels - the basic tool for all built in features - don't work in a floating boat.

 

I would recommend the exact opposite.

 

Would that then be a 'non-alcoholic level' or a 'non-intoxicant level' ?

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If fitting out on land, then the boat must be first made to sit with the water-level, level, both side to side and end to end.  The base plate will need to be supported at much closer intervals than you would think, no more than 1 metre, and each load bearing.

The object being to replicate floating attitude and support.

Then great care in lifting, and transport the completed boat.  Allowing time for everything to "settle" once floating, before remedial works.

 

Bod.

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13 hours ago, Murflynn said:

except that spirit levels - the basic tool for all built in features - don't work in a floating boat.

 

I would recommend the exact opposite.

Yes, but the first time the hull sits in water all bets (levels) go out the window (or porthole according to choice) 

I fitted out from a bare shell afloat in a local marina. The only problem was that people would stop and talk to me. I spent 15 very happy years there.

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5 minutes ago, Slim said:

The only problem was that people would stop and talk to me. I spent 15 very happy years there.

 

Yes - folk really do underestimate how long a fit -out can take, and, in reality, a boat is never 'finished'.

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6 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Yes - folk really do underestimate how long a fit -out can take, and, in reality, a boat is never 'finished'.

Hi I know exactly what you mean, I happen to be a retired steel and alloy boat builder and while I still have all the kit to actually build from scratch I don't really want to take a Hull build on. 

My gear is also in france now so getting it back to the UK along with the hassle of trying to find somewhere to build is I bit more then we want to take on. That being said the Hull build is only a small part in the time scale, they can be put together very quickly, especially a narrow boat as they are basically slab sided. 

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7 minutes ago, Ironmaiden said:

..................... especially a narrow boat as they are basically slab sided. 

Now you are talking - you mean a 'steel sewer tube' !!!!

 

Are you planning to build to the RCD ? (I presume you are aware of the 2017 RCD changes for a 'sailaway')

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