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Lizzie53
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I want to have my boat surveyed and don't have a previous survey.   The marina who can do the lifting out require “All risk”  insurance cover.  I have third party insurance but I can’t find a company who will provide All Risk cover unless I already have a survey.   Catch 22.  Does anyone have any suggestions please?

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  • 1 year later...

I realise that this was over a year ago and that it was the only post Lizzie ever made, but........... This seems a very strange situation.

 

I have been lifted in & out dozens of times over the years (4 times in the last 2 years) with a variety of cranes, hoists and trailers and have NEVER been asked to provide my own insurance cover.

It has always been the responsibility of the crane operator, marina etc to provide cover for both your boat, and, any damage they may do to 3rd parties whilst 'swinging it around'

 

I'd be very interested in what the reasoning / justification behind the requirement was - was it that the boat was in such poor condition that they considered it may fall apart if lifted and they would not provide cover in that case ?

 

Has any one else had the same requirement placed on them ?

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25 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

It has always been the responsibility of the crane operator, marina etc to provide cover for both your boat, and, any damage they may do to 3rd parties whilst 'swinging it around'

It is my understanding (although I may be wrong) that under the lifting regulations the crane operator is always legally responsible for the lift, and so should be insured for the risks. That said I have seen an ancient crane at one boatyard which carried notices about all lifts being at the boatowner's risk, and that owners should have their own insurance. Not sure if that would stand up in court (or in a post-incident HSE investigation).

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4 minutes ago, David Mack said:

It is my understanding (although I may be wrong) that under the lifting regulations the crane operator is always legally responsible for the lift, and so should be insured for the risks.

 

That has always been my understanding and when I have asked about their insurance they have always confirmed they have full cover.

 

I also believe that it us not just crane operators but anyone  'doing something for payment', be they be a 'boat mover' a painter, welder, a lock keeper, a gas fitter, or electrician, they (or their company) are all required to hold public liability insurance as a minimum.

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Great information. As it’s not my boat that is getting lifted*, at my expense, for “my” pre-purchase survey, I better check before I sign any agreement. 
 

*or is a dry dock referred as something else.. 
 

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40 minutes ago, Mike42 said:

Great information. As it’s not my boat that is getting lifted*, at my expense, for “my” pre-purchase survey, I better check before I sign any agreement. 
 

*or is a dry dock referred as something else.. 
 

 

It could still 'break its back' if the hull is a bit iffy & it is not supported correctly.

Even a dry dock should have insurance.

 

I was at one marina where the marina owner was lifting a boat using a huge tracked JCB as a crane - he had estimated the balance point and had a single strap around the hull.

 

Lifted up and it was like 'time for a Kit-Kat' Snapped completely in two halves.

 

Having gone to ask about some work I needed doing - I put my head down and crept away, never to return.

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48 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

It could still 'break its back' if the hull is a bit iffy & it is not supported correctly.

Even a dry dock should have insurance.

 

I was at one marina where the marina owner was lifting a boat using a huge tracked JCB as a crane - he had estimated the balance point and had a single strap around the hull.

 

Lifted up and it was like 'time for a Kit-Kat' Snapped completely in two halves.

 

Having gone to ask about some work I needed doing - I put my head down and crept away, never to return.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

I was at one marina where the marina owner was lifting a boat using a huge tracked JCB as a crane - he had estimated the balance point and had a single strap around the hull.

Doesn't sound like  a good plan does it . 

Edited by MartynG
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17 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

snip

I was at one marina where the marina owner was lifting a boat using a huge tracked JCB as a crane - he had estimated the balance point and had a single strap around the hull.

 

Lifted up and it was like 'time for a Kit-Kat' Snapped completely in two halves.

 

snip

 

I can't comprehend what was in his mind to even try that.  I have had strops slip on GRP cruisers when we checked they were firmly in place but the hulls were still partially in the water. A single strap - must be brain dead.

  • Greenie 1
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I had a boat hanging bow down with both straps caught on the rudder and prop......simple rule is the boat owner pays for a dogman,or he slings the boat himself,and takes full responsibility.......I even offered the use of my ugly old spreader ,but the boatie  thought  the rusty pipe might damage the boat......my old Harman crawler used to ocassionally play up on one slew clutch ,but had the good quirk that when one track came off the ground,you still had  a ton before it tipped  over.

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