Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
TheSaintlyOne

Removing BMC 1500 Whilst boat is in the water

Featured Posts

Hi we have reached that stage where we removed all the cooling system etc and are left with our BMC 1500 ready to come out but currently it is still connected to the prop shaft.

 

The boatyard has said they can crane out the engine but prefer to do this whilst the narrowboat is still in the water are there any tips or suggestions for removing the prop shaft from the gearbox without letting in a load of water.  

 

The prop does seem to be held in place with a sort of collar as shown in the picture and the shaft is now much cleaner 

 

TIA

Screenshot_20200914-234409_Facebook.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Undo the 4 bolts that connect the two flanges at the bottom of the photo. Then you can crane the engine out. Leave the prop shaft in place until the boat is out of the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will have to push the shaft back a little so the land of the half coupling moves clear but that should not cause a major water leak so if you check the gland when you have pushed the shaft back there shoudl be no problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TheSaintlyOne said:

Hi we have reached that stage where we removed all the cooling system etc and are left with our BMC 1500 ready to come out but currently it is still connected to the prop shaft.

 

The boatyard has said they can crane out the engine but prefer to do this whilst the narrowboat is still in the water are there any tips or suggestions for removing the prop shaft from the gearbox without letting in a load of water.  

 

The prop does seem to be held in place with a sort of collar as shown in the picture and the shaft is now much cleaner 

 

TIA

Screenshot_20200914-234409_Facebook.jpg

 

Before you follow any of the above suggestions, thoroughly clean the shaft and surrounding area. I maybe trying to teach the grandmother to suck eggs, but all that debris has to be cleaned off. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like a mild steel shaft to me so I am sure it will have rust pits on it. I agree clean it, especially the bit just in front of the gland.

 

Its probably time, when the boat is out of the water to check the shaft and bearing for  wear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The gland looks to want some new packing as the follower is nearly close up to the bearing housing.  The follower studs look a bit short though to get any more in though.  If the bearing and shaft are coming out I would replace the two studs with longer ones, and fit locking nuts either side (not nylon type  stiff nuts).

N

PS The plummer block bearing is not likely to have a long life after all that cr@p has descended upon it, so either dismantle and clean then regrease it, or renew,   the bearing.

N

Edited by BEngo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To move the shaft back you'll probably have to remove the bolts holding the plummer block down to the cross member, it's bound to be stuck fast on the shaft. Incidentally is that a rusty crack in the cross member by the plummer blocks lefthand bolt in the photo or a bit of muck or shadow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget that a BMC 1.5 is a big old heavy lump. It might be a good idea to have some sort of compensatory ballast handy to replace the weight loss when the engine comes out. Barrels, those big blue ones, have been used by others. Depending on what ballast weight you have in the bow and what ballast weight is adjusting the sideways list it could have a detrimental effect when the lump comes out. Probably nothing to worry about but better to be prepared just in case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

With a cast gearbox like a PRM160, the BMC 1.5D is a 6 hundredweight, 300 kg minimum lift.

Ahhhhh Better Hold onto the 10 Bilge Water Containers for a few days then 😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TheSaintlyOne said:

Ahhhhh Better Hold onto the 10 Bilge Water Containers for a few days then 😎

You'll need lots of containers to put the countless litres of coolant into, assuming it's keel-cooled. Must get rid of those one of these days...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, phantom_iv said:

You'll need lots of containers to put the countless litres of coolant into, assuming it's keel-cooled. Must get rid of those one of these days...

It was Rad/skin tank cooled the new engine will be raw water cooled. The containers are full of the Bilge rain water mixed with coolant. The bow drains underfloor to the stern and the mixture had to be containered all future bilge water should be clean to pump over the side 😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think a BMC is heavy try a National DM2 and its gearbox, the flywheel alone weighs in at 22 stone . . .

Two of us managed it with no fancy kit, just a lot of grunting and colourful language and thankfully in the end no "incidents".

Just think ahead, plan carefully and you will be OK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.