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tehmarks

On the need to slow down

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A day boat has just come past with some gusto while I'm sitting on the front deck. No rocking, no crashing, no banging - actually no noticeable effect. No exaggeration. It then continued past the boat in front - crash, bang, creak, crash as it was rocked against the Armco.

 

Just an observation on the effect of mooring well... 🙂

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7 minutes ago, Dave Payne said:

but but but you must always slow down to a snails pace.

I think "tickover" is a more apt description.

Oh, welcome back Dave - if you have been on CWDF recently I haven't seen your posts. Everything O.K?

1 minute ago, Athy said:

I think "tickover" is a more apt description, and one with which I would agree unless there's a strong wind in which case it helps to keep a bit more way on.

Oh, welcome back Dave - if you have been on CWDF recently I haven't seen your posts. Everything O.K?...unless I've got the wrong person: are you from the Brum area and you used to have an avatar showing you with a moustache?

 

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Slowing down before you get to a moored boat is what to do, not going to tickover at 4mph just as you get level with the boat.

ive seen this done many times and not always by novice boaters.

 

But good mooring is always better.

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You could write a book about how to tie a boat. Much depends on whether the water is nice and deep at the edge, if it is then a couple of lines will be fine, the less water you are floating in the more uncomfortable it can get, one line at the front , one at the back, springs fore and aft and a centreline up in a tree and the boat will still surge to and fro. Interestingly I have seen great big commercials aground and tugs trying to haul them off and passing commercials often don't slow, I can only imagine that the wash might lift the boat by an inch or two and help gain a couple of metres.  I can assure you that the wash lifts Bee a couple of feet sometimes. We have 'surfed' a couple of times when overtaken by great big things which is 'interesting'

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Racing canoe’s cause the worst disruption, anyone who has moored between Cropredy and next lock will of had the experience.

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7 minutes ago, dunfixing said:

Racing canoe’s cause the worst disruption, anyone who has moored between Cropredy and next lock will of had the experience.

They do create a lot of wash for small craft, don't they? Our mooring is on that stretch, just below the town bridge. We don't mind them, as many are occupied by children and teenagers, who therefore are not sitting indoors gawping at electronic devices during their time on the water.

Edited by Athy

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59 minutes ago, Athy said:

I think "tickover" is a more apt description.

Oh, welcome back Dave - if you have been on CWDF recently I haven't seen your posts. Everything O.K?

 

Tickover isn't the requirement. It’s a different speed for every boat and impractical for some. I never fully wind off to pass moored boats but always slow to an appropriate speed for the circumstances. Whatever it is that’s written in CRT guidelines or conditions I suspect it doesn’t make reference to tickover.

 

JP

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Just now, Captain Pegg said:

Tickover isn't the requirement. It’s a different speed for every boat and impractical for some. I never fully wind off to pass moored boats but always slow to an appropriate speed for the circumstances. Whatever it is that’s written in CRT guidelines or conditions I suspect it doesn’t make reference to tickover.

 

JP

Wot he said ^^^

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A week or so ago we were heading south from Aynho Wharf, having filled up with diesel. After the bridge, there’s a long line of long term moorers, one of whom jumped out of his boat and shouted “that’s not tick over, you’ve rocked our boat”.

Rather than ignore him, I said “it often helps if you tighten your ropes more”.

To my great surprise he didn’t shout abuse, but went back and tightened his ropes!!
So I think maybe a lot of boaters don’t realise their 6 foot of slack rope fore and aft isn’t the best arrangement!

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4 hours ago, tehmarks said:

A day boat has just come past with some gusto while I'm sitting on the front deck. No rocking, no crashing, no banging - actually no noticeable effect. No exaggeration. It then continued past the boat in front - crash, bang, creak, crash as it was rocked against the Armco.

 

Just an observation on the effect of mooring well... 🙂

Seen this many times. 

 

Both people passing out boat without any crashing because we have a spring on, and passing a line of boats where most are ok, some very controlled, others smashing around.

 

Typically it is the latter ones which have slow down signs!

 

 

Daniel

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3 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

Tickover isn't the requirement. It’s a different speed for every boat and impractical for some. I never fully wind off to pass moored boats but always slow to an appropriate speed for the circumstances. Whatever it is that’s written in CRT guidelines or conditions I suspect it doesn’t make reference to tickover.

 

JP

I always thought the conditions were 2mph passed moored boats.

 

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52 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

I always thought the conditions were 2mph passed moored boats.

 

No. It is all about common-sense and empathy with other boaters. It isn't rocket science to judge when you are travelling too fast past moored boats and I suspect most people would be unable to judge their actual speed without an accurate GPS.

Edited by PhilR

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Whilst I know how to tie up and indeed my boat is well moored and I have a lot of experience of bigger stuff than sewer tubes I always slow to tickover passing moored boats however many there are in the line, unless its windy then a tad of power to get past. Its just good manners and its hardly a race is it. One of my interests is that when I approach a badly moored boat with slack lines I see if I can crawl past without the bight moving.

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On 07/08/2020 at 16:43, Bee said:

You could write a book about how to tie a boat. Much depends on whether the water is nice and deep at the edge, if it is then a couple of lines will be fine, the less water you are floating in the more uncomfortable it can get, one line at the front , one at the back, springs fore and aft and a centreline up in a tree and the boat will still surge to and fro. 

 

Indeed, I moor to 4 bollards with springs at both ends, but my mooring is quite shallow.

 

When boats pass too fast, the boat visibly sinks as the water is sucked from under it and you can hear it scraping on the bottom. Doesn't surge back or forth though 😁

Edited by cuthound
Bollards, not billiards- bluddy autocorrect

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36 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

Indeed, I moor to 4 bollards with springs at both ends, but my mooring is quite shallow.

 

When boats pass too fast, the boat visibly sinks as the water is sucked from under it and you can hear it scraping on the bottom. Doesn't surge back or forth though 😁

Where in Staffs did you find a long term mooring with 4 bollards in the right place to moor with 4 ropes?

 

Did you have your boat purpose built to fit?

 

Everytime I moor I wonder what length boat the canal folk work on for ring and bollard placing. Its not mine!

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34 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Where in Staffs did you find a long term mooring with 4 bollards in the right place to moor with 4 ropes?

 

Did you have your boat purpose built to fit?

 

Everytime I moor I wonder what length boat the canal folk work on for ring and bollard placing. Its not mine!

 

I moor at the end of my garden.

 

Removed 21 conifers that the previous owner had planted along the edge of the canal and then paved the edge, fitting the bollards to suit the boat we were in the process of buying.

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1 minute ago, cuthound said:

 

I moor at the end of my garden.

 

Removed 21 conifers that the previous owner had planted along the edge of the canal and then paved the edge, fitting the bollards to suit the boat we were in the process of buying.

Does that mean I can whizz past in future 

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Just now, ditchcrawler said:

Does that mean I can whizz past in future 

 

Only if you can put up.with noise of DQ hitting the bottom! 😁

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22 hours ago, PhilR said:

No. It is all about common-sense and empathy with other boaters. It isn't rocket science to judge when you are travelling too fast past moored boats and I suspect most people would be unable to judge their actual speed without an accurate GPS.

He didn’t say you should go past moored boats at 2mph, he was responding to my supposition about what the conditions actually say.

 

2 hours ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Where in Staffs did you find a long term mooring with 4 bollards in the right place to moor with 4 ropes?

 

Did you have your boat purpose built to fit?

 

Everytime I moor I wonder what length boat the canal folk work on for ring and bollard placing. Its not mine!

A good number of rings/bollards seem to be spaced every 35’ which has some logic. I find that I often have to tie off with very square lines with my 35’ boat. Hence I will often only use one of the providing mooring points and use a piling hook at the other end.

 

JP

Edited by Captain Pegg

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On 07/08/2020 at 20:50, Rob-M said:

I always thought the conditions were 2mph passed moored boats.

 

About the only thing that hasn't annoyed me this trip is the way everybody has passed me at a sensible speed.  Almost everything else has made me want to pack it in.

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The other day, the boater behind shouted at a hire boater to slow down, the steerer must have lost concentration then rammed us. When I looked outside the hire boat was 45 degrees wedged beteen us and the opposite bank.

 

No harm done though, good old Les Allen.

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