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grahame r

Someone who knows about Varnishing?

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Whilst our boat is of steel construction we have a lot of exterior wood which is currently in good condition and I'd like to keep it that way. Can anyone recommend a good varnisher? This seems to be a bit of a black art so I'm looking for an experienced practitioner. We are based on the Gloucester and Sharpness but being retired would be happy to travel assuming the Government will allow it. Thanks in advance. 

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Whatever you do, do not use Polyeurethane Varnish, it reacts with ultra violet light and degrades. Do not use anything water based, only go for a traditional spirit based product. My recommendation is Blackfriars Yacht Varnish which is good quality high gloss exterior varnish, others may well recommend another high gloss exterior varnish, LeTonkinois, I have never used it, but understand it performs very well.

Edited by David Schweizer

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Any coach painter should be able to put on varnish if you cannot DIY.

 

Varnishing is not difficult. In essence it is clear(ish) paint.  Rub down well with a medium grade paper.  Wipe with a tack rag or white spirit to remove all dust.  Apply a good outdoor varnish- Le Tonkois or Epifanes with extra UV filter are examples.  Use a good brush-Purdy or Hamilton Perfection are OK.

Allow to dry. Repeat as required.

N

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2 minutes ago, BEngo said:

Any coach painter should be able to put on varnish if you cannot DIY.

 

Varnishing is not difficult. In essence it is clear(ish) paint.  Rub down well with a medium grade paper.  Wipe with a tack rag or white spirit to remove all dust.  Apply a good outdoor varnish- Le Tonkois or Epifanes with extra UV filter are examples.  Use a good brush-Purdy or Hamilton Perfection are OK.

Allow to dry. Repeat as required.

N

Good advice on application. Where brushes are concerned, I used to always use Hamilton Perfection, but only use Purdy these days, not cheap but they last for ever, and they never shed bristles.

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Look at using something like West Epoxy system...if used well it can produce a varnish like finish....its transformed wooden boat building over the last few years and its much more durable than varnish....some of the wooden boat yards on the Thames would be a start.....or given where you are ask at Nielsens yard at Gloucester...they are very used to dealing with wooden boats

 

https://www.tnielsen.co.uk

Edited by frangar

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4 minutes ago, BEngo said:

Any coach painter should be able to put on varnish if you cannot DIY.

 

Varnishing is not difficult. In essence it is clear(ish) paint.  Rub down well with a medium grade paper.  Wipe with a tack rag or white spirit to remove all dust.  Apply a good outdoor varnish- Le Tonkois or Epifanes with extra UV filter are examples.  Use a good brush-Purdy or Hamilton Perfection are OK.

Allow to dry. Repeat as required.

N

another vote for Epifanes with UV filter.   great stuff!

 

an alternative to varnishing is Deks Olje which is used especially for teak - just wipes on with a rag - just keep adding coats of #1 until you get fed up, then apply a finish coat of #2.  Not so glossy but easy to maintain.

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Just now, frangar said:

Look at using something like West Epoxy system...if used well it can produce a varnish like finish....its transformed wooden boat building over the last few years and its much more durable than varnish....some of the wooden boat yards on the Thames would be a start.....or given where you are ask at Nielsens yard at Gloucester...they are very used to dealing with wooden boats

agree.  one coat soaks in and preserves the timber, the next (applied before the first coat is fully cured) coat gives a glossy finish.   

 

Strictly speaking the epoxy is not UV resistant and may go cloudy, so once it is fully cured (a week?) roughen up with abrasive and apply a coat of Epifanes.

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9 minutes ago, frangar said:

Look at using something like West Epoxy system...if used well it can produce a varnish like finish....its transformed wooden boat building over the last few years and its much more durable than varnish....some of the wooden boat yards on the Thames would be a start.....or given where you are ask at Nielsens yard at Gloucester...they are very used to dealing with wooden boats

 

https://www.tnielsen.co.uk

To get an even application of that, wouldn’t you have to remove all the old varnish?

 

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4 minutes ago, Goliath said:

To get an even application of that, wouldn’t you have to remove all the old varnish?

 

Yes you would...but thats possibly the best idea anyway if you are using traditional varnish....once it looks like it needs doing its usually too late for just overcoating.

15 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

agree.  one coat soaks in and preserves the timber, the next (applied before the first coat is fully cured) coat gives a glossy finish.   

 

Strictly speaking the epoxy is not UV resistant and may go cloudy, so once it is fully cured (a week?) roughen up with abrasive and apply a coat of Epifanes.

You can get a UV additive for West....look on the website...its amazing what it can be used for...ive used it on my wooden hatches/doors/wetroom floor etc both over painted and not...been very impressed

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Ahoy Grahame. Ask Ron Seal, :)

Edited by bizzard
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A few year’s back I did a bit of varnishing on the cabin doors. 
There’s scumbling with Roses and castles which really need a complete redo. Paint has faded and bits have chipped and flaked. But I like them, I like the style and I like the natural ‘distressed’ look and wanted to preserve them in that state. 
So I used soapy water and a very gentle grade of wire wool to clean them and provide a key for a layer of varnish. 
I used that French varnish with a picture of a yacht on the tin. 
After 4 (?) years the varnish is fine and the paint work has not degraded any further. 

I guess like any painting project it’s providing a key for the paint or varnish to attach to that’s the trick. 

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Sea going cruise ships varnish their handrails twice a year to keep them nice and shiny, they are high quality timber, and they use quality varnishes but the sun degrades the finish and they haven't found a better solution yet.

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I've used Le Tonkinous on my boat.

 

6 coats on external wood, then every year rough the surface with a green 3M scourer and add another coat. 

 

Internal surfaces have 2 coats that lasts for years.

 

Very easy to apply and dries to a glossy finish without brush marks.

 

If you want a satin or matt finish add Gelomat to the final coat. 

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3 hours ago, bizzard said:

Ahoy Grahame. Ask Ron Seal, :)

Ahoy, I think Ron is more suited to the domestic market. Hope you're surviving lockdown, don't suppose it affects you any more than it does us!

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4 hours ago, frangar said:

Look at using something like West Epoxy system...if used well it can produce a varnish like finish....its transformed wooden boat building over the last few years and its much more durable than varnish....some of the wooden boat yards on the Thames would be a start.....or given where you are ask at Nielsens yard at Gloucester...they are very used to dealing with wooden boats

 

https://www.tnielsen.co.uk

Two good suggestions, I'll be in Gloucester Docks next week and will also look into the West Epoxy System.

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