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Electrician


Layla
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Hi, 

 

does anyone recommend an electrician that could Rewire my boat for basics like lights and plug ins. As well as hooking me  up to a recommended solar panel and generator. 
 

 

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Having read your “engine” thread I for one was hoping for a happy ending to your first foray into boat ownership; the kind of ending where you go back to the seller and demand your money back.
Please take a step back and reassess what you have got into before committing to spending any more money.
You’ve already spent a large sum of money on a 42 year old boat with a 12 month old survey identifying £5k worth of hull work, possible engine damage, and now a rewire.

There really is a point where taking the lose and selling this one on will cost you less in the long run.

 

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4 hours ago, Eeyore said:

Having read your “engine” thread I for one was hoping for a happy ending to your first foray into boat ownership; the kind of ending where you go back to the seller and demand your money back.
Please take a step back and reassess what you have got into before committing to spending any more money.
You’ve already spent a large sum of money on a 42 year old boat with a 12 month old survey identifying £5k worth of hull work, possible engine damage, and now a rewire.

There really is a point where taking the lose and selling this one on will cost you less in the long run.

 
 

Hi Joe, about £3200 worth of work was done at the time of the survey doing some replacing and new anodes et cetera. The starter motor has been replaced albeit possibly only temporarily. And the possible engine damage/leak turned out to just be a loose screw at the bottom of the oil filter.

feeling optimistic thanks :)  it is possible that the hull needs welding or replating And that could end up being a large cost Amortised over 10 years though it’s okay. And with property prices in London where they are if I end up spending 30,000 on a 42-year-old Boat that structurally sound and clean and fresh inside I will remain optimistic

  • Greenie 1
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The London  congestion charge, and the difficulty of parking anywhere near a boat meand very fed if any will do any sort of work in London

 

If you can get out a bit then either Uxbridge, or Ralph at P&S Marine at Watford.

 

N

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3 hours ago, BEngo said:

The London  congestion charge, and the difficulty of parking anywhere near a boat meand very fed if any will do any sort of work in London

 

If you can get out a bit then either Uxbridge, or Ralph at P&S Marine at Watford.

 

N

Hey, thanks for the response. But do you mean I won’t be able to find an electrician in London? Why does it need to be a ‘boat’ electrician? 

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4 minutes ago, Layla said:

Hey, thanks for the response. But do you mean I won’t be able to find an electrician in London? Why does it need to be a ‘boat’ electrician? 

I thought you did up houses, would you ask an auto electrician to rewire a house for you?

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23 minutes ago, Layla said:

Hey, thanks for the response. But do you mean I won’t be able to find an electrician in London? Why does it need to be a ‘boat’ electrician? 

Taking your question at face value and assuming this is not a wind-up.

 

There are many reasons, At the most basic level, you cannot use the same type of cable for wiring a boat as you do a house - but - a house electrician would not know that.

Cables have to be a certain 'size' to pass the Boat safety examination and for the boat to be granted a Boat safety Scheme Certificate - will your domestic electrician know what these are ?

There are a number of specifications (standards) that should be adhered to wiring boats, your domestic electrician will never have heard of them (because he has no need to know them) but he will know the standards (specifications) required by law for wiring a house.

 

Ask you electrician if he works to these standards :

 

 

Screenshot (289).png

Screenshot (290).png

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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Alan is correct but in practice meeting the BSS requirements does not need those ISO standards but, especially on a 30 year old boat that does not have to comply with  the Recreational Craft Directive. I bet if you asked 50% or more on inland boat electricians if they worked to those standards you would get blank looks. It would be different if you asked if they worked to the BMEA standards or to the BSS. I mention this because I fear you will find it difficult to get someone capable of doing a decent job on a boat in London so you don't want to make things harder for you.

 

Please put all thoughts of using a domestic electrician out of your mind unless he has and understands the standards Alan quoted or the BMEA ones.

 

Things will probably work out far cheaper and be more satisfactory if you spend some time studying and then doing it yourself. The basic rules are simple enough and you will find  guidance in the electrical notes on my website.

Edited by Tony Brooks
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7 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

Alan is correct but in practice meeting the BSS requirements does not need those ISO standards

Indeed. I was simply pointing out that the BSS required cables of certain minimum sizes, which a domestic electrician would not be aware of, and, that the ISO specifications would show that flexible conductors should be used, not T&E, again which a domestic electrician would not know.

 

A domestic electrician would also unlikely to be aware that 'boat wiring' is more likely to be specified on volt drop rather that the domestic wiring which will be specified on current rating,

 

You are, of course, correct when saying :

 

10 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

Please put all thoughts of using a domestic electrician out of your mind unless he has and understands the standards Alan quoted or the BMEA ones.

 

The RCD is getting very close now to 30 years old, being introduced in July 1994, it is surprising how quickly time passes.

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