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steve59

Spanners, wrenches and sockets etc.

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Do narrow boats use metric, imperial or a mixture of both......Thanks Steve

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Depends on age and which motor they have. Later Japanese and Eastern engines are metric so are european engines.

Old friends BMC are imperial, mostly unified threads.

Real old motors will be Whitworth if British.

 

Really, anything goes !

TD' 

  • Happy 1

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Depends on the age of the boat and engine.

 

A brand new one is probably all metric, an old one probably used to be all Imperial but has had longer for random owners to alter bits so could be a mix.

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2 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

To be sure you need two adjustable spanners.

One imperial,and one metric.😆

And a big hammer. If the big hammer doesnt work,  then dont force it just use an even bigger hammer.

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More seriously, for Beta 43 et al, metric: I use 6,8, 2x10, 12, 2x13,14,15,2x17, 18, and some bigger ones than I have forgotten the size of.

Socket sets bits: One of the most useful fits the socket set part of a belt that grips the oil filter and makes getting the filter off easy (with a large sliding T bar).

Also 2 gas bottle spanners (left handed).

Edited by system 4-50

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1 minute ago, buccaneer66 said:

Won't a gas axe and a grinder fix everything?

Out of date now it’s plasma cutters 😀

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12 minutes ago, system 4-50 said:

Adjustable spanners? Just a couple of Stilsons...

Left and right- handed ones.

  • Happy 1

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Our base engine is the John Deere/Beta JD3. The engine is made in France but to an American design so its nuts and bolts are imperial. All the marinising parts put on by Beta are metric. The fuel tank fittings on the boat are 5/16 but those on the engine are 8mm. The gearbox is a PRM and I believe its based on an earlier imperial design. PRM say its updated over the years to be metric, but think there just might be a bit of imperial left.

and the injection pump is Stanadyne, the bolts holding that together use a Torx style head but with FIVE rather than 6 points.

 

Portholes etc fitted with metric bolts but the larger hull openings are (of course) BSP threads.

I have both metric and imperial spanners but  keep two adjustables next to the engine and mostly just use these.

 

.................Dave

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51 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

To be sure you need two adjustable spanners.

One imperial,and one metric.😆

 

41 minutes ago, system 4-50 said:

Adjustable spanners? Just a couple of Stilsons...

Bodgers use adjustable spanners. Proper engineers use the correct spanner as it stops the nuts getting rounded off. 

  • Greenie 1

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10 minutes ago, Tonka said:

 

Bodgers use adjustable spanners. Proper engineers use the correct spanner as it stops the nuts getting rounded off. 

A revelation!

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Don’t forget to get a bucket of steam to clean parts in and a set of long stands and sky hooks for lifting things 

Graham

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6 minutes ago, jacko264 said:

Don’t forget to get a bucket of steam to clean parts in and a set of long stands and sky hooks for lifting things 

Graham

Don't forget after cleaning in that bucket of steam you'll need plenty of elbow grease for lubrication 😁

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1 minute ago, buccaneer66 said:

Don't forget after cleaning in that bucket of steam you'll need plenty of elbow grease for lubrication 😁

The old ones are the best👍

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Yes and my brother actually went to the hardware store when we where still at school after Dad asked him to go get some.

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3 hours ago, Tonka said:

 

Bodgers use adjustable spanners. Proper engineers use the correct spanner as it stops the nuts getting rounded off. 

Adjustables ("shifters") are fine for bigger nuts and bolts, but for the little ones its better to use the vernier caliper, the digital ones are best.

 

......................Dave

  • Haha 1

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1 minute ago, dmr said:

Adjustables ("shifters") are fine for bigger nuts and bolts, but for the little ones its better to use the vernier caliper, the digital ones are best.

 

......................Dave

Here’s a question for you Dave:

Undoing an allen key bolt,

a 5mm Allen key is too big and 4mm key too small,

what do you do?

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4 minutes ago, Goliath said:

Here’s a question for you Dave:

Undoing an allen key bolt,

a 5mm Allen key is too big and 4mm key too small,

what do you do?

Is it in fact an imperial one? or if its a worn metric will an imperial one be a decent fit?

Is there some crap in the hole stopping the key going in?

Get a spare 5mm key and file a gentle taper on the end and then hammer it in.

Are you sure its Allen (hexagon) and not splines? whats it on?

 

..................Dave

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Just now, dmr said:

Is it in fact an imperial one? or if its a worn metric will an imperial one be a decent fit?

Is there some crap in the hole stopping the key going in?

Get a spare 5mm key and file a gentle taper on the end and then hammer it in.

Are you sure its Allen (hexagon) and not splines? whats it on?

 

..................Dave

Nowt wrong with the head

It is in fact imperial.  3/16”

 

No such thing as a 4.5mm Allen key as I found out 👍

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4 minutes ago, Goliath said:

Nowt wrong with the head

It is in fact imperial.  3/16”

 

No such thing as a 4.5mm Allen key as I found out 👍

I reckon you could find a 4.5mm Allen key if you looked on the internet, the real bugger is my injection pump, they look like allen screws but have 5 sides instead of 6.

 

 

............Dave

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12 minutes ago, dmr said:

I reckon you could find a 4.5mm Allen key if you looked on the internet, the real bugger is my injection pump, they look like allen screws but have 5 sides instead of 6.

 

 

............Dave

Well I never!
Just googled it and they do exist 😃

I phoned around for one and no one had one either single or in a kit. And a local engineer place I’m sure said they don’t make them. 
So I went for a kit with 3/16” and it fitted perfect.


I’m always building a list of individual tools and sockets to buy. Sometimes there’s no point buying a whole set when you’ll only need one or two sizes. 

 

Each new job seems to introduce another tool of some sort. Even if it’s just a shorter spanner to get in somewhere or a longer one for better leverage. 



As an aside:

Had to buy a new wire strimmer/crimper/cutter thing the other week. Lost the other one. 
- Now that is a handy bit of kit for doing simple electrics, such as 12v wire terminals, fitting 12v sockets and the like. I’d recommend one as part of a basic tool box. 


 

 

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