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Longmeadow

Dangerous/reckless Intent?

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The River Trent near Farndon/Fiskerton is apparently a dangerous place to be if you are in a small boat, having seen a recent video on Facebook, where the owner of a large cruiser travelling at a high speed nearly swamped a small cruiser, in fact damaged its sterndrive when the resultant wash caused it to hit the river bed hard. Not content with that, when the skipper of the small boat shouted across at the offender to slow down, the big cruiser was turned around and accelerated hard and extremely close to the small boat, nearly swamping and capsizing it.  My question is who enforces any speed limits on the Trent and how can the rivers in the UK be regulated to prevent this type of dangerous 'driving'?  In France all skippers of motorised craft over 5m have to hold a permit... which can be withdrawn when this type of stupidity occurs ... but in the UK? 

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1 minute ago, Longmeadow said:

The River Trent near Farndon/Fiskerton is apparently a dangerous place to be if you are in a small boat, having seen a recent video on Facebook, where the owner of a large cruiser travelling at a high speed nearly swamped a small cruiser, in fact damaged its sterndrive when the resultant wash caused it to hit the river bed hard. Not content with that, when the skipper of the small boat shouted across at the offender to slow down, the big cruiser was turned around and accelerated hard and extremely close to the small boat, nearly swamping and capsizing it.  My question is who enforces any speed limits on the Trent and how can the rivers in the UK be regulated to prevent this type of dangerous 'driving'? In France all skippers of motorised craft over 5m have to hold a permit... which can be withdrawn when this type of stupidity occurs ... but in the UK? 

We name and shame them on here and they lose their jobs on magazines...........

TD'

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35 minutes ago, Longmeadow said:

The River Trent near Farndon/Fiskerton is apparently a dangerous place to be if you are in a small boat, having seen a recent video on Facebook, where the owner of a large cruiser travelling at a high speed nearly swamped a small cruiser, in fact damaged its sterndrive when the resultant wash caused it to hit the river bed hard. Not content with that, when the skipper of the small boat shouted across at the offender to slow down, the big cruiser was turned around and accelerated hard and extremely close to the small boat, nearly swamping and capsizing it.  My question is who enforces any speed limits on the Trent and how can the rivers in the UK be regulated to prevent this type of dangerous 'driving'?  In France all skippers of motorised craft over 5m have to hold a permit... which can be withdrawn when this type of stupidity occurs ... but in the UK? 

Have a read, as all is not as it might first seem.

Edited by The Happy Nomad

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It always amazes that everyone thinks they are the 1st to post on a subject and never check to see if anyone else has posted.

 

I completely agree with the OP - there should be Government registration of boats and all boat owners must pass a competency exam for both practical and theory, much as the rest of the world does, but, I don't think it will get much support on this forum.

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2 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

It always amazes that everyone thinks they are the 1st to post on a subject and never check to see if anyone else has posted.

 

I completely agree with the OP - there should be Government registration of boats and all boat owners must pass a competency exam for both practical and theory, much as the rest of the world does, but, I don't think it will get much support on this forum.

Well it is their first ever post on the Forum so I we guess we can cut them some slack?

 

Besides it isnt actually possible to check each and every post is it? And if the title is ambiguous, as often happens even more difficult.

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59 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

We name and shame them on here and they lose their jobs on magazines...........

TD'

Regardless of whether they are guilty or not, we use to do the same with hangings but managed to grow out of that

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1 hour ago, Tracy D'arth said:

We name and shame them on here and they lose their jobs on magazines...........

TD'

Who? Was it that Steve Heywood?

 

🤞
 

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41 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

I completely agree with the OP - there should be Government registration of boats and all boat owners must pass a competency exam for both practical and theory, much as the rest of the world does,

I've never understood France's stance. Boat owners have to pass such exams, but hirers don't. So, complete novices can mingle, unschooled and untested, on the waterways with more experienced people who have had to prove their competence. The French are usually logical but I'm not sure that this rule fits that description.

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3 minutes ago, Athy said:

I've never understood France's stance. Boat owners have to pass such exams, but hirers don't. So, complete novices can mingle, unschooled and untested, on the waterways with more experienced people who have had to prove their competence. The French are usually logical but I'm not sure that this rule fits that description.

Boat hire worldwide is pretty much like that, but it tends to be limited as to the type of boat you can hire, hiring a £250k yacht or £3m motor cruiser tend to require some qualifications, whilst hiring a little putt-putt in the Greek Islands doesn't.

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10 minutes ago, Athy said:

 , but hirers don't. So, complete novices can mingle, unschooled and untested, on the waterways with more experienced people who have had to prove their competence. The French are usually logical but I'm not sure that this rule fits that description.

They were logical enough not to kill their hire business overnight

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Just now, ditchcrawler said:

They were logical enough not to kill their hire business overnight

I'm not sure what you mean. Hiring was banned in France for a time, just as it was here. It has now re-started, just as it has here. Which countries have killed their hire businesses?

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

I'm not sure what you mean. Hiring was banned in France for a time, just as it was here. It has now re-started, just as it has here. Which countries have killed their hire businesses?

If you had to have a qualification to navigate a hire boat very few people would ever hire for the first time, who would spend money doing a course and getting a certificate if they had never tried boating?

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3 hours ago, Goliath said:

Who? Was it that Steve Heywood?

 

🤞
 

No, it was Great Haywood out of Haircut 100.

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The motor cruiser Margoletta nearly swamped Mrs Barrable and her pug dog William whilst she was rowing her little tender up Horning reach.

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1 hour ago, bizzard said:

The motor cruiser Margoletta nearly swamped Mrs Barrable and her pug dog William whilst she was rowing her little tender up Horning reach.

That would be the hallabaloos  

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5 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

there should be Government registration of boats and all boat owners must pass a competency exam for both practical and theory, much as the rest of the world does, but, I don't think it will get much support on this forum.

How would the hire or share boat industry deal with that?

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40 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The same way as the rest of the world does.

 

They dont

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18 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

They dont

Exactly - only private owners need to be qualified. Hirers of inland waterway boats don't need qualifications. Hirers of  sea-going yachts either need relevant qualifications or to hire a qualified skipper.

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2 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

That would be the hallabaloos  

That's them.

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6 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

If you had to have a qualification to navigate a hire boat very few people would ever hire for the first time, who would spend money doing a course and getting a certificate if they had never tried boating?

You may have answered the wrong post.

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11 hours ago, Athy said:

You may have answered the wrong post.

This was the posting where you said you you couldn't see the French logic on allowing novices to hire with no qualifications when other boaters needed them. If people  required a qualification before they could hire in France how many do you think would ever hire for the first time. The French IMO applied logic and realised if they had this requirement then their hire industry would die overnight. Likewise if you needed a qualification in the UK before hiring how many hire boats  would be out this week?

I appreciate I don't always make myself clear with the written word as others on here have pointed out, sorry. I have also cocked up with the added quote 

 

image.png.9996d1ff006c6e0755431971ff651698.png

 

Edited by ditchcrawler
spelling

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On 08/07/2020 at 14:06, Longmeadow said:

The River Trent near Farndon/Fiskerton is apparently a dangerous place to be if you are in a small boat, having seen a recent video on Facebook, where the owner of a large cruiser travelling at a high speed nearly swamped a small cruiser, in fact damaged its sterndrive when the resultant wash caused it to hit the river bed hard. Not content with that, when the skipper of the small boat shouted across at the offender to slow down, the big cruiser was turned around and accelerated hard and extremely close to the small boat, nearly swamping and capsizing it.  My question is who enforces any speed limits on the Trent and how can the rivers in the UK be regulated to prevent this type of dangerous 'driving'?  

 

Perhaps I've missed something but you don't give any indication of how fast the big cruiser was actually going or whether they were in fact breaking any speed limit? If the depth of the river in that place was shallow enough for the smaller boat to come down on the river bed on its stern drive then I can't understand how it was possible for the bigger boat to be going that fast? The other thing is that the wash of a bigger boat shouldn't in itself be enough to endanger a smaller boat unless the skipper is very inexperienced and doesn't know how to deal with it. Turning around and coming back to intentionally endanger the smaller boat sounds like psychotic behaviour rather than just reckless, but we only have your second hand report to go on and there are always two (or more) sides to every story.

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On 08/07/2020 at 14:41, The Happy Nomad said:

Have a read, as all is not as it might first seem.

Ok it does seem aggressive. But it wasn't "high speed" and I still can't see the "near swamping" that the OP was talking about. If your boat can't handle a foot high wave then perhaps it shouldn't be on the river.

Edited by blackrose
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