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Narrowboat Saxa

Cruiser or Traditional Stern

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If fitting a 'pram' cover to the stern of any boat make sure you can easily and properly roll up and secure the front screen section. Otherwise your boat is virtually immobilised if it's raining. We made this mistake of not ensuring ours could be.

 

 

Edited by The Happy Nomad
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3 hours ago, Ray T said:

lis 2.JPG

 

Before anyone mentions, the stern line is not hanging directly off the tiller or tiller pin. Had this arrangement for many years and never had the line round the blades yet...........

 

Have you asked Mike for his opinion on that arrangement? I bet he will say it should be stored on the cabin roof or slide.

Edited by David Schweizer

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2 hours ago, David Schweizer said:

Have you asked Mike for his opinion on that arrangement? I bet he will say it should be stored on the cabin roof or slide.

Yes, his comment is not really printable.

When I sailed off shore I kept a line to hand if needs be, attached to the pushpit in a similar manner and never had any problems.

Also when in older yachts we would stream a "Walker Log" behind, admittedly it was always taken in before the engine was started.

Interesting is a photo posted by Peter Scott in another thread, of Rocket Ron's leisure boat and he has put the stern line on the fenders still attached to the dolly.

 

Photo: credit Peter Scott

Rocket Ron 2002 Photo Peter Scott.jpg

 

41160657-804-640x426.jpg

Edited by Ray T

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I cant be bothered to go back 100 posts so here is my vote for a cruiser stern. So much easier to access the engine. With a pram cover, a great storage area in the winter when you are not travelling as much and a great place to hang wet clothes to drip.

We put our pram cover up each night. One benefit is during the colder months you can dry clothes under the pram cover without worrying about wind and rain.

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58 minutes ago, Ray T said:

Yes, his comment is not really printable.

When I sailed off shore I kept a line to hand if needs be, attached to the pushpit in a similar manner and never had any problems.

Also when in older yachts we would stream a "Walker Log" behind, admittedly it was always taken in before the engine was started.

Interesting is a photo posted by Peter Scott in another thread, of Rocket Ron's leisure boat and he has put the stern line on the fenders still attached to the dolly.

 

Photo: credit Peter Scott

Rocket Ron 2002 Photo Peter Scott.jpg

 

That is how I usually stred my stern line, either on the fender or coiled round one of the dollies.

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3 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

I cant be bothered to go back 100 posts so here is my vote for a cruiser stern. So much easier to access the engine. With a pram cover, a great storage area in the winter when you are not travelling as much and a great place to hang wet clothes to drip.

We put our pram cover up each night. One benefit is during the colder months you can dry clothes under the pram cover without worrying about wind and rain.

Exactly Bob it's what I had on my cruiser stern narrowboat by far the best way of boating. When I traded it in it was January 2010 the ICE was still present and it was bitter cold on the trent! Yet we were warm with back door open and heating on , I saw a couple of boats on the move and they were dressed like Scott of the Antarctic! Huddled into the stern of the boat! Didn't look cosy to me?

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On 28/06/2020 at 20:32, ditchcrawler said:

If your boat is a trad, stand inside the slide to steer, I don't see how the " wooden handle" would wack you

May I ask, if you stand inside the slide, doesnt the inside get wet when its raining as its then open to the elements?

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6 minutes ago, luckda said:

May I ask, if you stand inside the slide, doesnt the inside get wet when its raining as its then open to the elements?

Yes, but you can use a canoe-skirt.

 

It's an elasticated skirt that fits around your body, and then the bottom of the skirt is elasticated and fits around the slide runners.

 

As you get older the pi55 takers become less important and warmth take precedence.

 

Premium Waterproof Kayak Canoe Boat Spraydeck Spray Deck Skirt ...

Cockpit Style Kayaking Special Waterproof Skirt Splash Proof Apron ...

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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5 minutes ago, luckda said:

May I ask, if you stand inside the slide, doesnt the inside get wet when its raining as its then open to the elements?

Buttibg in -

Not if you've designed the boat 'properly' with a slightly wider hatch and a working step at the same height as the rear deck.

Whenit's tissing -it-down, I shut te rear doors, pull the slide nearer to me  and off we go

 

Simples!

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16 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Yes, but you can use a canoe-skirt.

 

It's an elasticated skirt that fits around your body, and then the bottom of the skirt is elasticated and fits around the slide runners.

 

As you get older the pi55 takers become less important and warmth take precedence.

 

Premium Waterproof Kayak Canoe Boat Spraydeck Spray Deck Skirt ...

Cockpit Style Kayaking Special Waterproof Skirt Splash Proof Apron ...

Or have a cruiser stern and pram cover and lots of you can be nice dry and warm

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14 minutes ago, peterboat said:

Or have a cruiser stern and pram cover and lots of you can be nice dry and warm

That's always been my 1st choice but once made a mistake and bought a trad (awful thing)

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On 28/06/2020 at 10:00, mrsmelly said:

Can of worms here. My preference having owned and lived aboard each type for many years is the cruiser is better hands down, no contest.

And I have lived on and boated on all sorts of sterns for   40 years in all weathers and prefer the trad every time 

.

seriously get the arse end that works for you n your doggo 

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1 hour ago, OldGoat said:

Buttibg in -

Not if you've designed the boat 'properly' with a slightly wider hatch and a working step at the same height as the rear deck.

Whenit's tissing -it-down, I shut te rear doors, pull the slide nearer to me  and off we go

 

Simples!

And if the step is getting wet put a copy of towpath talk on it to soak up the rain.

 

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2 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

And if the step is getting wet put a copy of towpath talk on it to soak up the rain.

 

One has a ribbed mat on the step in One's boat and the heat from the engine thereunder aids in its (the water) evaporation.

fnar fnar..

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4 hours ago, OldGoat said:

Buttibg in -

Not if you've designed the boat 'properly' with a slightly wider hatch and a working step at the same height as the rear deck.

Whenit's tissing -it-down, I shut te rear doors, pull the slide nearer to me  and off we go

 

Simples!

I still get the water running down me, one thing we have done is put a rail just inside the hatch and deploy a shower curtain to keep the wet within the area of the step.

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I suppose it's all a bit silly - fuss for a little bit of rain. After all boating is supposed to be wet.

 

Lee rail under and all that.....

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I have a trad with a short tiller, so I steer from the deck, just stand in one corner or another, only had my oilskins on once.

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30 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

This is what can happen when you stand in the ark of the tiller...when reversing.

Fixed that for you DC.  I'm not advocating standing in the arc, as I can see clearly  the mechanism involved in momentum forcing the tiller over hard when the main blade of the rudder with all its leverage strikes something solid when reversing, as this unfortunate chap was.  I can't, however, see that occuring when moving forward. The balance edge of the rudder has far less length and leverage potential, and nothing able to apply anything like the same momentum is gonna sneak between the prop and the skeg.

 

I just think that the safety message is stronger if it focusses on the considerable danger when in reverse, rather than a broad brush also covering a very limited in risk in forward gear.  I try to always stay clear of the arc, but am absolutely assiduous when reversing. 

 

Of course, I hasten to add, I'm content to change my view if there's evidence supporting a simarly high risk when going forward! :D

 

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17 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

Fixed that for you DC.  I'm not advocating standing in the arc, as I can see clearly  the mechanism involved in momentum forcing the tiller over hard when the main blade of the rudder with all its leverage strikes something solid when reversing, as this unfortunate chap was.  I can't, however, see that occuring when moving forward. The balance edge of the rudder has far less length and leverage potential, and nothing able to apply anything like the same momentum is gonna sneak between the prop and the skeg.

 

I just think that the safety message is stronger if it focusses on the considerable danger when in reverse, rather than a broad brush also covering a very limited in risk in forward gear.  I try to always stay clear of the arc, but am absolutely assiduous when reversing. 

 

Of course, I hasten to add, I'm content to change my view if there's evidence supporting a simarly high risk when going forward! :D

 

I've been hit hard going forward, just once. With a large cruiser stern it didn't take me over the age but it gave me quite a fright.

PS I have no explanation for how it occurs. As with the other posters, I don't think it should.

Edited by system 4-50

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6 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

Fixed that for you DC.  I'm not advocating standing in the arc, as I can see clearly  the mechanism involved in momentum forcing the tiller over hard when the main blade of the rudder with all its leverage strikes something solid when reversing, as this unfortunate chap was.  I can't, however, see that occuring when moving forward. The balance edge of the rudder has far less length and leverage potential, and nothing able to apply anything like the same momentum is gonna sneak between the prop and the skeg.

 

I just think that the safety message is stronger if it focusses on the considerable danger when in reverse, rather than a broad brush also covering a very limited in risk in forward gear.  I try to always stay clear of the arc, but am absolutely assiduous when reversing. 

 

Of course, I hasten to add, I'm content to change my view if there's evidence supporting a simarly high risk when going forward! :D

 

I agree with this. I too can't see how a tiller can swing itself sufficiently hard except if you were turning hard under power and swung the tip of the rudder into the bank - not much danger of doing that on a canal!

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Watched a trad NB doing this today coming out of a marina reversing with the roller over in the arc of it if it had hit anything he would have been overboard and under!

It was a tight T exit and he had tried to pus around with the bow on the bank then he went into reverse and was on the wrong side of the tiller if you get my gist? Anyway he managed to get it into forward before the rudder struck and hit the bank again as he went forward!

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On 12/09/2020 at 13:50, ditchcrawler said:

 

Sad, I hope the gentleman makes a full recovery.

 

If the tiller swings across whe  the rudder hits an obstruction it doesn't matter what type of stern you have.

 

I once saw a guy with a cruiser stern step backwards onto the low stern rail, which upended him so that he entered the canal head first.

 

Best to always stand in front of the tiller bar when the propellor is turning, irrespective of direction of travel.

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On 13/07/2020 at 17:06, Rob-M said:

And if the step is getting wet put a copy of towpath talk on it to soak up the rain.

 

If the wet is bothersome pull in and put t' kettle on.

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