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Covid 19 and working locks.


RichLech
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1 hour ago, Goliath said:


Snip:

<Can’t see a good reason for me wearing gloves. Just another throw away item to clog up the planet. Easier to wash hands. >
 

 

Generally I would agree but if you wear gloves they do not need to be disposable. 

 

As previously stated I did wear some gloves to start with as a reminder not to touch my face (and pushing hair away from my face is a problem for me) 

 

A friend of mine has dermatitis and hand sanitiser is not a very friendly option for her when out and about.  Another friend wanted to wear gloves to remind her not to touch her face but ordinary cotton gloves or gardening gloves work just as well and can be dropped into a bucket of disinfectant to be reused many times 

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We sanitise our hands at each lock or flight, just before getting off the boat and just before getting back on.

 

That said I think the biggest risk is from gongoozlers peering over the edge of the lock and trying to talk you as the boat rises or falls. A sharp poke in the eye with a boat hook seems effective at moving them away from the edge of the lock.?

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25 minutes ago, cuthound said:

We sanitise our hands at each lock or flight, just before getting off the boat and just before getting back on.

 

That said I think the biggest risk is from gongoozlers peering over the edge of the lock and trying to talk you as the boat rises or falls. A sharp poke in the eye with a boat hook seems effective at moving them away from the edge of the lock.?

This is exactly what we have done. Before the boat is touched, hands are sanitised.

 

Cuts on hands etc are an entry point for Weil's disease, also known as Leptospirosis. It is found in the urine of rats and cattle, so you have to be unlucky to get water containing the urine in a cut in your skin. 

However, it can give flu like symptoms, but it can also kill if it attacks the organs in your body. Handling ropes, splashes of water. Hand hygiene always important when boating, covid or not!

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Well today I have seen people driving cars and riding bikes by them selves with masks on, a lady coming out of the petrol station with gloves on putting her credit card in her purse and you only need to look at the TV to see the number who have their noses over the masks or pull them down to talk. I think the work gloves are a good idea as others have said, less likely to pick your nose 

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22 hours ago, MaryP said:

Cuts on hands etc are an entry point for Weil's disease, also known as Leptospirosis. It is found in the urine of rats and cattle, so you have to be unlucky to get water containing the urine in a cut in your skin. 

However, it can give flu like symptoms, but it can also kill if it attacks the organs in your body. Handling ropes, splashes of water. Hand hygiene always important when boating, covid or not!

Quite prevalent in canal water.

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  • 2 weeks later...

In my opinion many more deaths probably occured than should have done because of the governments two week or so delaying the lockdown and whatnot, they wanted the money to keep rolling in. They thought the virus was just going to go away as did that imbecile Trump in the US. And then our goverment suddenly realized it wasn't going to just go away,  suddenly panicked, called for an immediate lockdown, started building Nightingale hospitals and all the rest of it. The governments obviouselly had their scientists and health advisors in their pockets.  Murderers.

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7 minutes ago, bizzard said:

In my opinion many more deaths probably occured than should have done because of the governments two week or so delaying the lockdown and whatnot, they wanted the money to keep rolling in. They thought the virus was just going to go away as did that imbecile Trump in the US. And then our goverment suddenly realized it wasn't going to just go away,  suddenly panicked, called for an immediate lockdown, started building Nightingale hospitals and all the rest of it. The governments obviouselly had their scientists and health advisors in their pockets.  Murderers.

A popular supposition to keep lefties happy. The reality is lock-downs require a fair bit of planning, I know of one local authority who were planning for lock-down many weeks beforehand.

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14 minutes ago, Midnight said:

A popular supposition to keep lefties happy. The reality is lock-downs require a fair bit of planning, I know of one local authority who were planning for lock-down many weeks beforehand.

Everything was left too late including the start of any planning, unlike countries like South Korea and New Zealand and Australia to an extent who had it all well planned early on, testing, PPE ect ect in place.

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4 hours ago, bizzard said:

Everything was left too late including the start of any planning, unlike countries like South Korea and New Zealand and Australia to an extent who had it all well planned early on, testing, PPE ect ect in place.

try saying that in Melbourne.

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On 10/07/2020 at 13:41, bizzard said:

Everything was left too late including the start of any planning, unlike countries like South Korea and New Zealand and Australia to an extent who had it all well planned early on, testing, PPE ect ect in place.

Actually a large amount of work was down in planning for a pandemic several years ahead. (Alas, for the wrong pandemic, but much would carry over) The bit they could not plan for was getting the politicians to push the start button!

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2 hours ago, Mike Todd said:

Actually a large amount of work was down in planning for a pandemic several years ahead. (Alas, for the wrong pandemic, but much would carry over) The bit they could not plan for was getting the politicians to push the start button!

The planning was fine, but all the expensive bits, like storing protective gear, was ignored. It's what happens when you try to run a country with journalists who basically just write what they think the public will buy, rather than with people interested in what actually happens.

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18 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

The planning was fine, but all the expensive bits, like storing protective gear, was ignored. It's what happens when you try to run a country with journalists who basically just write what they think the public will buy, rather than with people interested in what actually happens.

I think that quite a bit was stockpiled but unfortunately no-one predicted a novel virus so they stocked for a big flu pandemic.

 

Really shows the importance of

 

(a) doing a lot of planning, and then a lot more

(b) make a pact with the politicians that either they do as they are told or they put in the effort to understand what is happening and its limitations

(c) have plenty of people who, like the military and the (pre Cummings?) Civil Service whose skills sets are basically in planning and implementation (I first wrote execution but I thought some might take it the wrong way!)

 

If you think you know what the future holds, then you are very likely to be wrong! But that should not, for one moment, stop planning and working out as many scenarios as possible. By planning you have a much better hold on what is possible, or not possible, once the crisis looms.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Mike Todd said:

I think that quite a bit was stockpiled but unfortunately no-one predicted a novel virus so they stocked for a big flu pandemic.

 

Really shows the importance of

 

(a) doing a lot of planning, and then a lot more

(b) make a pact with the politicians that either they do as they are told or they put in the effort to understand what is happening and its limitations

(c) have plenty of people who, like the military and the (pre Cummings?) Civil Service whose skills sets are basically in planning and implementation (I first wrote execution but I thought some might take it the wrong way!)

 

If you think you know what the future holds, then you are very likely to be wrong! But that should not, for one moment, stop planning and working out as many scenarios as possible. By planning you have a much better hold on what is possible, or not possible, once the crisis looms.

 

 

 

Indeed, when I worked for BT I was a member of the disaster planning group. Not only did we plan for various scenarios (above normal high ambient temperatures, flooding, various terrorist acts etc) , but we played "war games" to test that the plans actually worked.

 

"Failure to plan is planning for failure", as the hackneyed old saying goes.

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On 12/07/2020 at 15:17, Mike Todd said:

I think that quite a bit was stockpiled but unfortunately no-one predicted a novel virus so they stocked for a big flu pandemic.

 

Really shows the importance of

 

(a) doing a lot of planning, and then a lot more

(b) make a pact with the politicians that either they do as they are told or they put in the effort to understand what is happening and its limitations

(c) have plenty of people who, like the military and the (pre Cummings?) Civil Service whose skills sets are basically in planning and implementation (I first wrote execution but I thought some might take it the wrong way!)

 

If you think you know what the future holds, then you are very likely to be wrong! But that should not, for one moment, stop planning and working out as many scenarios as possible. By planning you have a much better hold on what is possible, or not possible, once the crisis looms.

 

 

There was indeed quite a stockpile of PPE. Unfortunately, rather than rotating the stockpile (send old stuff out a year before it expires so that it can be used and buy new to replace) it became a static stockpile and a large proportion was out of date. Subsequent claims to have tested that it was still safe to use have been questioned due to the tiny number of items sampled for testing.

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3 minutes ago, Geoff said:

Screenshot_2020-07-12-07-19-27-1.png

Sanitise or wash the gloves. Wear marigolds and sanitise/ dip in soapy water after working lock, if you are that paranoid.

Also dont go down foxton, or if you do get the escapees from leicester to do all the towpath side lock gates, and growl at the grockles on the non towpath side who cant read.

A biohazard suit is a good idea in Leicester in normal times.

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On 12/07/2020 at 15:26, cuthound said:

. Not only did we plan for various scenarios (above normal high ambient temperatures, flooding, various terrorist acts etc) , but we played "war games" to test that the plans actually worked.

 

"Failure to plan is planning for failure", as the hackneyed old saying goes.

 

The government DID have a large scale pandemic exercise in 2016 using the emergency services and hospitals.

It was halted early as a failure, and the outcome reports withheld from public view..

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