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Building a Wood Burning Stove Surround


clrpm
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I'm building a surround for my new wood burning stove.

 

The plan as per the attached photos is to tile over the calcium cilicate board which have been attached to offcuts with a 10mm air gap however I have two questions:

 

1. does the hearth underneath need to be built in the same way with an air gap? Or is there a better solution?

 

2. The plan was to tile right up to the top as the material behind the calcium cilicate board is gyrpoc (which was probably a bad idea). As this is a combustible material do I need to reconsider and replace with ply even though it'll be tiled over and is only covering the area above the stove itself (and behind the airgap/cilicate)?

 

Thanks in advance for any guidance or help provided.

IMG_20200615_133251 (1).jpg

IMG_20200519_184441 (1).jpg

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3 minutes ago, blackrose said:

1. No.

2. Not sure I understand?

 

Question: what are you using to create the air gap between your offcuts and the calcium silicate fire retardant board? ?

 

Thanks for answering.

 

To clarify the offcuts have been used to create the air gap between the plasterboard/gyproc and the calcium cilicate. I followed the Soliftec stoves in boats guidance pdf for distances etc.

 

I just don't know if I should replace the plasterboard/gyproc with ply (even though there is the air gap and the top half is going to be tiled) because plasterboard/gyproc is combustible. 

 

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Comment [not an expert]:

Ply is combustable, ...

The stove looks quite close at the corners

I think porcelain tiles are best.

I would not have stove sitting on anything 'flimsy'

Edited by LadyG
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7 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Comment [not an expert]:

Ply is combustable, ...

The stove looks quite close at the corners

I think porcelain tiles are best.

I would not have stove sitting on anything 'flimsy'

Thanks for the advice.

 

Yeah, that's not where it's going to be placed - it was just too heavy for me to move foward for the pic haha

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12 hours ago, clrpm said:

 

Thanks for answering.

 

To clarify the offcuts have been used to create the air gap between the plasterboard/gyproc and the calcium cilicate. I followed the Soliftec stoves in boats guidance pdf for distances etc.

 

I just don't know if I should replace the plasterboard/gyproc with ply (even though there is the air gap and the top half is going to be tiled) because plasterboard/gyproc is combustible. 

 

 

Plasterboard is not combustible. Indeed when I was fitting out data centres to London Building Regs Section 20, a 2 hour fire resistance was achieved and approved by the local boroughs fire officer by cladding a stud wall with 2 layers of plasterboard on each side and sealing any gaps with intumescent silicone.

 

However as previously mentioned plasterboard is hydroscopic and doesn't tolerate vibration.

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Just a little ditty. Even if opened up on a cold week and emitting plenty of cabin heat I can put my hand under my stove and palm down onto the floor and its warm, not even a little bit hot.

I only ever buy morso stoves so are all stoves the same or do some actualy manage to send the heat downhill and get the flooring hot?? anyone know?? Taa

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1 hour ago, mrsmelly said:

Just a little ditty. Even if opened up on a cold week and emitting plenty of cabin heat I can put my hand under my stove and palm down onto the floor and its warm, not even a little bit hot.

I only ever buy morso stoves so are all stoves the same or do some actualy manage to send the heat downhill and get the flooring hot?? anyone know?? Taa

True, Squirrel is very cool underneath, I keep the next day's kindling under ours.

TD'

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3 hours ago, David Mack said:

I think I would clad the underside of the gunwale overhang with calcium silicate board as well. 

Thanks, that's a good point!

3 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

Plasterboard is not combustible. Indeed when I was fitting out data centres to London Building Regs Section 20, a 2 hour fire resistance was achieved and approved by the local boroughs fire officer by cladding a stud wall with 2 layers of plasterboard on each side and sealing any gaps with intumescent silicone.

 

However as previously mentioned plasterboard is hydroscopic and doesn't tolerate vibration.

Thanks for the information, this is really helpful. Would you suggest removing and replacing with another material? Ply perhaps?

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Get rid of the gyproc while it's accessible and before it self-destructs.

 

Space the fireboard from ply backing with offcuts if you have any.

 

Fireboard up to deckhead level near the flue (depending on spacing it can be much narrower than the bits at the bottom).

 

As said, don't forget under the gunwhales.

 

Insulate around the deckhead penetration.

 

Don't worry about beneath the stove, none of mine have got hot there. Tiles on ply are fine.

 

Make provision to bolt the stove down.

 

OVMD!

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5 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

Just a little ditty. Even if opened up on a cold week and emitting plenty of cabin heat I can put my hand under my stove and palm down onto the floor and its warm, not even a little bit hot.

I only ever buy morso stoves so are all stoves the same or do some actualy manage to send the heat downhill and get the flooring hot?? anyone know?? Taa

Yes some do/did and its usually those that sit on the underside of the ash pan without legs. I think the house regs mention this and allow different hearth specs for each type.

 

Why the OP is messing about building a heart for a boat stove when in all likelihood a tiled paving slab will do  have no idea.

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