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matty40s

Bluebells....how far did you go...

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So, with the bluebell season now over, and the main flowering during the strictest lockdown period, how far did you travel to see the glorious sights and enjoy your daily exercise. We travelled 4 miles to Everdon Stubbs for a fantastic display.

20200523_213846.jpg

 

...and can anyone beat 263 miles each way .....

Edited by matty40s
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The bluebell season isn't over here.  They are in full flower a few yards from my back door.   (Bluebells in Scotland are a totally different plant, but I'm using English here.)

 

 

bluebells.jpg

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The dom's days are numbered. Yesterday morning he had "the PM's full support". I reckon he'll be gone by Tuesday.  

 

 

 

 

4 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

The bluebell season isn't over here. 

 

We still have some in the garden in South Manchester, but I'm not sure whether they are English or Scottish ones. Let's face it, the seasons are pretty well fecked up at the moment!

Edited by Machpoint005

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4 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

The bluebell season isn't over here.  They are in full flower a few yards from my back door.   (Bluebells in Scotland are a totally different plant, but I'm using English here.)

 

 

bluebells.jpg

These look like the Spanish invader bluebells, English ones have bells on one side of the stem only.   Rip 'em out!

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4 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

"the PM's full support"

 

That has long been Westminster code for "clearing his desk."

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but in true Newspeak fashion, he didn't break the rules, those were never the rules, we must have a mass misunderstanding and all misremember the lockdown rules. In my mind common sense for childcare would have been if both parents became too ill to care for a youngster, then one healthy member of the extended family would need to collect the child, not ship potentially three sick people up the country 'just in case' you needed to call on family assistance.

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We went about a mile all told.  There are still plenty on the mountainside where I live.  There is a big patch every year in a horse shoe hollow.  Big enough to be easily seen from the A5 that passes 3-4 miles away.  They are often later than other places because it is generally colder being high up at around 1500ft  asl.

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I'm sure that many such flowers have been finding their way into many homes, as people who normally buy cut flowers from the supermarket or the florist's are not currently going so. We had some lovely sprays of lilac on the mantelpiece a couple of weeks ago.

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16 minutes ago, Athy said:

I'm sure that many such flowers have been finding their way into many homes, as people who normally buy cut flowers from the supermarket or the florist's are not currently going so. We had some lovely sprays of lilac on the mantelpiece a couple of weeks ago.

Wild flowers are best left where they are for everyone to enjoy.  Bluebells and many other species are protected by the 1981 (amended 1998) Wildlife and Countryside act.  Taking plants is also protected under the theft act 1968 as the land owner is deemed to own the plants growing on it.  There are more stringent rules too if they happen to be growing in a national park or nature reserve.

 

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/6-things-you-might-not-know-about-bluebells

Edited by churchward
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6 minutes ago, Athy said:

I'm sure that many such flowers have been finding their way into many homes, as people who normally buy cut flowers from the supermarket or the florist's are not currently going so. We had some lovely sprays of lilac on the mantelpiece a couple of weeks ago.

I thought the English ones were protected so you couldn't pick them or the bulbs. Anyway, a bigger deterrent to their removal is this from the Woodland Trust

'If you are to pick a bluebell, many believe you will be led astray by fairies, wandering lost forevermore.' 

Best off leaving 'em alone

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Interesting comments; I wonder how often the Bluebell Police hammer on people's doors and confiscate their vases of flowers. In our case, the lilac blooms were from bushes in our garden, incidentally.

 

I also wonder if Mrs. Athy and I are the only boaters who pick canalside flowers to brighten up our boat's cabin when we are out cruising. I'll bet we're not.

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5 minutes ago, Athy said:

Interesting comments; I wonder how often the Bluebell Police hammer on people's doors and confiscate their vases of flowers. In our case, the lilac blooms were from bushes in our garden, incidentally.

 

I also wonder if Mrs. Athy and I are the only boaters who pick canalside flowers to brighten up our boat's cabin when we are out cruising. I'll bet we're not.

That does not make it right or legal. I wonder if people would feel the same if they came into their gardens and took flowers?

 

In the case of Bluebells it takes several years for damage by footfall to recover.  A plant grown from seed takes up to 7 years to flower.

Edited by churchward

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3 minutes ago, churchward said:

That does not make it right or legal. I wonder if people would feel the same if they came into their gardens and took flowers?

 

 

:D

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It is a criminal offence, Athy, and bluebells are a particularly delicate species, as churchward says.

I have always disliked cut flowers and much prefer a pot plant. Cut flowers are dead from the moment you cut them, and are one less opportunity for useful pollen and nectar for insects, and then they get thrown away.

ETA: my opinions are my own, and coloured to some extent by having been a professional conservationist in a previous career. Once a conservationist always a conservationist: one sees things like a couple walking down the road, with a bunch of dug up bluebells in their hands, and one tends to react.

Edited by Stilllearning
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1 minute ago, Stilllearning said:

Cut flowers are dead from the moment you cut them, and are one less opportunity for useful pollen and nectar for insects, and then they get thrown away.

 

Now there's a beautiful allegory.

 

It appears that one side of the debate is not at all interested in wild flowers., though.

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14 minutes ago, Stilllearning said:

It is a criminal offence, Athy, and bluebells are a particularly delicate species, as churchward says.

I have always disliked cut flowers and much prefer a pot plant. Cut flowers are dead from the moment you cut them, and are one less opportunity for useful pollen and nectar for insects, and then they get thrown away.

ETA: my opinions are my own, 

...and of course you're fully entitled to express them.

WE find room for cut flowers and for plenty of pot plants in our house.

 

I assume you're talking about French law and I have no idea whether picking flowers is a criminal offence in Britain - if so, there must be hundreds of thousands of criminal acts committed per year. As for bluebells, when I was a boy they grew in our nearby woods in Sheffield. People went and picked them by the fistful. Yet they grew again in profusion the next year, so perhaps your definition of "delicate" is different from mine.

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9 minutes ago, Athy said:

...and of course you're fully entitled to express them.

WE find room for cut flowers and for plenty of pot plants in our house.

 

I assume you're talking about French law and I have no idea whether picking flowers is a criminal offence in Britain - if so, there must be hundreds of thousands of criminal acts committed per year. As for bluebells, when I was a boy they grew in our nearby woods in Sheffield. People went and picked them by the fistful. Yet they grew again in profusion the next year, so perhaps your definition of "delicate" is different from mine.

 No,  it is the UK Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, as churchward has already mentioned.

ETA, the delicate description come see from an interview I watched on Countryfile this morning.

Edited by Stilllearning

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1 minute ago, Athy said:

...and of course you're fully entitled to express them.

WE find room for cut flowers and for plenty of pot plants in our house.

 

I assume you're talking about French law and I have no idea whether picking flowers is a criminal offence in Britain - if so, there must be hundreds of thousands of criminal acts committed per year. As for bluebells, when I was a boy they grew in our nearby woods in Sheffield. People went and picked them by the fistful. Yet they grew again in profusion the next year, so perhaps your definition of "delicate" is different from mine.

In the UK it is not a general offence to pick wild flowers but it is illegal to uproot and transplant wild flowers.  It is also illegal to pick protected species like Bluebells for instance that are specifically protected I quoted the relevant UK acts for you above.  These acts do not form opinion they are legal fact.

 

Many woodland Bluebell habitats have been destroyed by people picking them and trampling the plants .  The Bluebell has been in serious decline which is why they were included in the Wildlife and Countryside act.  

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4 minutes ago, churchward said:

  The Bluebell has been in serious decline which is why they were included in the Wildlife and Countryside act.  

Also threatened by the Spanish variety which invades and destroys the English variety. 

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2 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Also threatened by the Spanish variety which invades and destroys the English variety. 

It interbreeds with the native plant. Coming over here, shagging our bluebells......

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Oh dear, Cummings just arrived at No 10. Do we still give him til Tuesday after Grant 'Michael Alexander' Shapps's grilling by Andrew Marr

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Just now, BilgePump said:

Oh dear, Cummings just arrived at No 10. Do we still give him til Tuesday after Grant 'Michael Alexander' Shapps's grilling by Andrew Marr

Why try to turn this post into a political squabble? Please, we are discussing bluebells.

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9 minutes ago, BilgePump said:

Oh dear, Cummings just arrived at No 10. Do we still give him til Tuesday after Grant 'Michael Alexander' Shapps's grilling by Andrew Marr

Sorry, I got it wrong anyway. His online get rich quick persona was Michael Green

 

But bluebells, yes the Spanish ones are rampant. Had to rip out a lot from the garden where they were taking over. The'll grow their way through a rubble sack

Edited by BilgePump

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20 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Why try to turn this post into a political squabble? Please, we are discussing bluebells.

I've let a few posts with some political reference stand, just in case there's some connection between Mr. Cummings and bluebells. Is there?

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