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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

Yes, having a landline in a house is Ok, but not much use on a boat.

 

 

Of course it isn't. I'm not sure if you live on board, in which case you would need a phone on your boat. We don't live on board, and never feel the need to use one while we're on board - it's one of the things (along with television) which one goes boating to escape from.

 

Mrs. Athy does own a mobile phone but it's never switched on. It's there in case of emergency.

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6 minutes ago, Athy said:

To make and receive telephone calls.

I assume you're joking about the "show off" - an epithet more suited to people who wave expensive mobile jobbies around, surely.

I've been with them since I first had a phone installed (1982, from memory). There have been occasional problems over the years but they have always been sorted out. In addition, I have shares in them which yield consistently good dividends.

What is "hateful" about them?

 

Where do I start:

 

Premium charging for a capped sub-standard service.

Advertise rates tens of pounds cheaper than existing customers pay but only for new customers.

Incapable of understanding what "an intermittent fault" means

Charging customers when they have done no work or rectified the faults - note that same fault on more than one occasion caused by their time expired local copper network.

Help desk who cut you off if you try to explain why you know they are lying.

Help desk in a far off places staffed by people you can't understand.

help desk staff who can only read from a  script.

Refusal to communicate by ordinary email or reply by letter to letters

 

And then when I finally had had enough and switched had the gall to call me and ask why and what they could do to keep me. They did not take kindly to be told employ help desk staff who speak English with a UK accent, employ competent technical help desk staff, stop help desk staff lying, and give existing customers the same deal as they advertise for new users on TV.

 

Yes a hateful company but as all the above ensures your dividends are kept high I can see why you approve of them

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26 minutes ago, Athy said:

Of course it isn't. I'm not sure if you live on board, in which case you would need a phone on your boat. We don't live on board, and never feel the need to use one while we're on board - it's one of the things (along with television) which one goes boating to escape from.

 

Mrs. Athy does own a mobile phone but it's never switched on. It's there in case of emergency.

If it's switched off, how would you know if someone else is having an emergency?

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?They also strangle broadband speeds for customers who do not use it a lot.

My mum only uses the computer for emails, skype and keeping her butterfly/moths pictures updated on a website. 

She had real problems with Skype dropping off and emails taking an age to load, websites took minutes to load. 

Everything local was investigated , and then did a ping test. Instead of the promised andboaid for 40mbs, she was getting about 0.3-5. Calling BT over several days and experiencing the same as Tony above, was no good. 

Then we found out that only high users in an area keep the promised speeds, low and intermittent users slowly have the capacity taken away as 'they wont notice'. This can be reduced until it is virtually un-usable, as my mum found out.

Had to go quite high to get it sorted, and a refund.

Unfortunately, Mum is like Athy, stick with BT as they are a safe British company!!☹

Just now, doratheexplorer said:

If it's switched off, how would you know if someone else is having an emergency?

I have had this conversation many times with Mum and Dad!!

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Just now, matty40s said:

 

I have had this conversation many times with Mum and Dad!!

Me too.  I have friends who have the same issue.  It's common, yet it's also like banging your head against a wall.

 

Even when my sister had to be rushed into hospital and things looked about as bleak as it can get.  My parents were wandering around a shopping centre near their home.  Knowing their habits I ended up having to go to the shopping centre and get a call out over the tannoy to get hold of them.

 

It turned out that not only were both their phones turned off, but they were at home, 'in the drawer'.  The reason?  "Well we didn't need to bring them".

 

That was best part of ten years ago, and since then, they've learned nothing and still do the same thing.

 

My sister was ok in the end.

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Gosh Tony, you've got it in for them!

A few of your gripes are well wide of the mark (for example I have just renewed my agreement at the same rate as if I'd been a new customer, and did so by telephone negotiation with a man called Dean who sounded totally English). Our old lines were replaced by new ones (are these fibre?) five or six years ago. Others I can't comment upon as I I've had no experience of them.

   Yes, I'm pleases with the performance of my B.T. shares - that few hundred pounds a year helps put the jam on the bread and butter, and the payments have been consistent, with a gradual rise, over a number of years. Who could ask for more?

Edited by Athy
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8 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

If it's switched off, how would you know if someone else is having an emergency?

No, I mean if we're having one - such as about three years ago when we had a (minor) road accident and weren't near a phone box, so she used the phone to call the Green Flag rescue service.

   

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2 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Just interested.

 

As your £40 per month doesn't seem particularly good value when compared to other offerings, eg Three at £15 per month which includes unlimited phone calls, (including to mobiles), & unlimited Broadband,(including WiFi - Hotspot) and no Line rental.

If I had 3 reception at home I would dump BT

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12 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

If it's switched off, how would you know if someone else is having an emergency?

To be fair here, if you were the one having the emergency would you really want Athy to be the one who responded?

 

"Hang on while I drive home to ring an ambulance for you.  Back in four hours ..."

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1 hour ago, haza said:

thanks guys and girls for the info ...like i said we are going with ,three .but there is a issue with them at the moment  caused by these awful times .and i have got to wait for the three shop  open to collect my box router .what ever i it is ,comes at £22 a month . thanks and stay safe 

Remember to go SIM only when your contract runs out and you have paid for the router they have given you

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4 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

To be fair here, if you were the one having the emergency would you really want Athy to be the one who responded?

 

"Hang on while I drive home to ring an ambulance for you.  Back in four hours ..."

Cheeky....and erroneous (I don't drive).

But in such circumstances, if one were far from home, one would obviously seek a nearby phone box. How do you think that people coped for all those years before the 21st century when mobile phone use became more widespread?

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14 minutes ago, Athy said:

Gosh Tony, you've got it in for them!

A few of your gripes are well wide of the mark (for example I have just renewed my agreement at the same rate as if I'd been a new customer, and did so by telephone negotiation with a man called Dean who sounded totally English). Our old lines were replaced by new ones (are these fibre?) five or six years ago. Others I can't comment upon as I I've had no experience of them.

   Yes, I'm pleases with the performance of my B.T. shares - that few hundred pounds a year helps put the jam on the bread and butter, and the payments have been consistent, with a gradual rise, over a number of years. Who could ask for more?

Well the copper lines from the green box to the house, especially those going up the local pole and overhead have not been renewed for tens of years, they only seem to do patch repairs. I think the bod who wanted me to continue being ripped off was English - try the help desk when the BT email server  goes down and they deny all knowledge of it. Try reporting an intermittent noisy line and so on. Try telling them the intermittent noisy line they have just billed you £60 for repairing (even though they did nothing) is still intermittently noisy.

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1 minute ago, Athy said:

Cheeky....and erroneous (I don't drive).

But in such circumstances, if one were far from home, one would obviously seek a nearby phone box. 

 

I assume you haven't needed to look for a useable phone box in the last 20 years then.

 

I can't remember the last time I saw one with a phone in that wasn't at a major transport hub.

 

3 minutes ago, Athy said:

How do you think that people coped for all those years before the 21st century when mobile phone use became more widespread?

 

They used phone boxes in the latter part of the 20th century of course - there were some around in those days. 

 

Telegrams via the Post Office before that, and carrier pigeon or posthorse before that :D

 

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5 minutes ago, Athy said:

Cheeky....and erroneous (I don't drive).

But in such circumstances, if one were far from home, one would obviously seek a nearby phone box. How do you think that people coped for all those years before the 21st century when mobile phone use became more widespread?

In those days there were far more phone boxes.  Also, many times people didn't cope when things went very wrong and they couldn't get help.

18 minutes ago, Athy said:

No, I mean if we're having one - such as about three years ago when we had a (minor) road accident and weren't near a phone box, so she used the phone to call the Green Flag rescue service.

   

That doesn't answer the question.

I'll try rephrasing:

What happens when someone needs to get hold of you in an emergency, and your phone is switched off?

 

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2 minutes ago, Athy said:

Cheeky....and erroneous (I don't drive).

But in such circumstances, if one were far from home, one would obviously seek a nearby phone box. How do you think that people coped for all those years before the 21st century when mobile phone use became more widespread?

This is why clever engineers invented the 21st century in the first place. To avoid having to find a phone box ?. Been there done that in assorted unreliable cars in the previous century. Now of course, if you can find one, a phone box is more likely to have a book exchange, or a defibrillator than a phone inside. A mobile still doesn't always save you a long walk. Broke down a few years back in a deep valley out in the wilds and had to climb up high enough to get a signal.

 

Jen

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1 minute ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

I assume you haven't needed to look for a useable phone box in the last 20 years then.

 

 

 

Nope, wrong again, unless you classify March station (whence I sometimes phone for a taxi, last time was just before Christmas) as a "major transport hub".

2 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

In those days there were far more phone boxes.  Also, many times people didn't cope when things went very wrong and they couldn't get help.

That doesn't answer the question.

I'll try rephrasing:

What happens when someone needs to get hold of you in an emergency, and your phone is switched off?

 

Yes, it did answer the question.

What might this emergency be?

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2 minutes ago, Athy said:

Nope, wrong again, unless you classify March station (whence I sometimes phone for a taxi, last time was just before Christmas) as a "major transport hub".

Yes, it did answer the question.

What might this emergency be?

1.  No it didn't.  You answer was about you having an emergency.  My question was about someone else needing to contact you in their emergency.

 

2.  That's the thing about emergencies.  They're often difficult to predict.  Nobody predicted my sister being rushed to hospital as I described above.  The good news is that it's so easy to be contactable these days.  You just leave your phone on.

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10 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

Well the copper lines from the green box to the house, especially those going up the local pole and overhead have not been renewed for tens of years, they only seem to do patch repairs. I think the bod who wanted me to continue being ripped off was English - try the help desk when the BT email server  goes down and they deny all knowledge of it. Try reporting an intermittent noisy line and so on. Try telling them the intermittent noisy line they have just billed you £60 for repairing (even though they did nothing) is still intermittently noisy.

 

I notice that nobody in this thread has mentioned download speed.

 

I had been waiting 5 or 6 years for BT to come up with fibre-optic broadband in my locality. Last year I got fed up of waiting and switched to Virgin (no, I am no lover of Branson either) but the speed is about 53Mbps, compared with 8 with BT (if I was lucky).

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Athy said:

Cheeky....and erroneous (I don't drive).

But in such circumstances, if one were far from home, one would obviously seek a nearby phone box. How do you think that people coped for all those years before the 21st century when mobile phone use became more widespread?

Most phone boxes in rural areas are now book exchanges 

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the opportunity cost of not having a mobile phone is pretty high. The amount I saved on taxi fare and getting accurate info while travelling alone will make it worthwhile, and being able to help/get help instantly, being in touch with people when you want, is priceless.

The only downside I see is we can no longer have some movie plots that relies on people not being contactable. 

 

7 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Most phone boxes in rural areas are now book exchanges 

or advertisement for adult entertainment services in urban areas.

Edited by restlessnomad
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