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Interior Hull Paint - What goes on top of red oxide?


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Hello, 

 

I'm currently de-rusting, sanding and red oxide priming the interior hull of my boat. I've seen boats with just primer on the inside and others that are 'blacked' with what I assume is the bitumen based stuff used on the outside of the hull. This seems a sensible step to paint over the oxide primer for extra protection, I've also seen advice to paint the underside of the ply wood flooring.

 

Does anyone have advice on what paint is best to use? Is the bitumen stuff safe for interior use?

 

Thank you! 

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It will work but stink for a while.

I would suggest a cheap gloss paint, colour immaterial, you will never see it again.

Danbolin was bilge paint but I found it to be poor.

 

Yes, seal the backs of floor and all wall panels with gloss oil paint or waterproof varnish, the water based stuff is crap in a boat. If its high VOC and gives you a headache it is better.

 

If there is no paint inside why not use 2 pack epoxy? It will outlast the steel.

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Thank you! 

 

If it smells initially that's not too much of a problem, I'm not living on the boat at the moment. Any idea how long it would take to stop stinking?

 

I was thinking this one from screwfix... https://www.screwfix.com/p/cementone-waterproofing-bituminous-paint-black-5ltr/82914?cm_sp=managedredirect-_-decorating-_-bitumenpaint&_requestid=392702

 

I'd like to use 2 pack epoxy, I already have it on the outside. Ideally I need something that I can get a hold of in the next few days. Tricky with the current situation... Do you have any pointers on good brands on epoxy/where to get it?

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2 hours ago, WillCful said:

 

 

I'd like to use 2 pack epoxy, I already have it on the outside. Ideally I need something that I can get a hold of in the next few days. Tricky with the current situation... Do you have any pointers on good brands on epoxy/where to get it?

Sherwin Williams, Bolton. Used to be Leigh's Paints. Excellent firm, brilliant epoxy paint,  loads of advice and help.

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I've used Bitumen, both Rylards "proper" hull blacking and the Screwfix Cemetone stuff and have found it worse than useless. Fails within a few months and because the rust is concentrated where the coating first breaches, causes bad pitting. Removed from an as yet unlined cabin and recoated with good primer and whatever oil based enamel I had tins of available (2 coats) survived a winter of heavy condensation, no significant rust so far. gotta redo the rest of two boats asap, big 'orrible job.

 

Avoid bitumen, its rubbish

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Thanks for the responses, I’ve contacted Sherwin Williams and another company called T A Industrial Paints about 2 pack epoxy paint... Hopefully I can get hold of some in a reasonable time frame. 
 

Don’t mind spending a bit more of it’s going to last. 

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5 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

On my new Hull I did the whole lot in waxoyl. Warm day and spray it on. Quicker by a mile and does a great job. 

I bet if you need any welding doing and small holes are in the hull  the welder well love you

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3 hours ago, WillCful said:

Thanks for the responses, I’ve contacted Sherwin Williams and another company called T A Industrial Paints about 2 pack epoxy paint... Hopefully I can get hold of some in a reasonable time frame. 
 

Don’t mind spending a bit more of it’s going to last. 

If you're using a two pack epoxy then ideally it needs to go on top of bare steel. There's really not a lot of point painting two pack on top of a single part red oxide primer if I've understood your headline and original post correctly. A complete paint system is only as good as its weakest link so I think you'd be wasting both time and money doing what you're proposing. (Time because mixing epoxy needs to be precise by volume, and money because it's more expensive than a single part paint.)

Edited by blackrose
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12 hours ago, jacko264 said:

I bet if you need any welding doing and small holes are in the hull  the welder well love you

I sold that boat nearly twenty years ago so :D Its better at stopping corrosion than paint with all the masses of preperation needed for the paint to adhere. It was also only a days job to do the complete shell. Admitted twas a bare shell as I bought it that way to fit out.

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22 hours ago, WillCful said:

Ok, thank you, good to know. I haven't got on to the engine compartment yet just the interior cabin hull.

I painted the insides of the engine box on Helvetia with two generous coats of Hammerite Smooth, It was still in perfect condition ten years later when I sold the boat. The main issue was getting the compartment completely clean and oil/grease free, which was easy for me as the engine was on a Bench in Jonathon Hewitt's workshop at the time.

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12 hours ago, blackrose said:

If you're using a two pack epoxy then ideally it needs to go on top of bare steel. There's really not a lot of point painting two pack on top of a single part red oxide primer if I've understood your headline and original post correctly. A complete paint system is only as good as its weakest link so I think you'd be wasting both time and money doing what you're proposing. (Time because mixing epoxy needs to be precise by volume, and money because it's more expensive than a single part paint.)

I guess I don’t know a lot about how the epoxy paint systems work... I haven’t painted on the red oxide yet, the first step is I’m taking it back to bare steel and going from there. I need more information if I’m going to use epoxy. Currently considering the red oxide and then Hammerite, my impression of hammerite is that it’s a pain to work with but hard wearing when it’s on.

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On 16/04/2020 at 11:26, WillCful said:

Hello, 

 

I'm currently de-rusting, sanding and red oxide priming the interior hull of my boat. I've seen boats with just primer on the inside and others that are 'blacked' with what I assume is the bitumen based stuff used on the outside of the hull. This seems a sensible step to paint over the oxide primer for extra protection, I've also seen advice to paint the underside of the ply wood flooring.

 

Does anyone have advice on what paint is best to use? Is the bitumen stuff safe for interior use?

 

Thank you! 

We use red oxide gloss over the primer on Fulbourne

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5 hours ago, Tim Lewis said:

We use red oxide gloss over the primer on Fulbourne

 

Isn't that a bit of an oxymoron? 

 

As I understood it, red oxide is a rust inhibiting primer designed for application to bare steel. 

 

Is this perhaps a gloss top coat the same colour as red oxide primer? 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Isn't that a bit of an oxymoron? 

 

As I understood it, red oxide is a rust inhibiting primer designed for application to bare steel. 

 

Is this perhaps a gloss top coat the same colour as red oxide primer? 

 

 

https://www.birdbrand.co.uk/product/red-oxide-gloss-paint/

 

"An all in one primer & finish.  This is a rich oxide paint has red decorative gloss coating containing corrosion inhibitors.

"

  • Greenie 1
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23 hours ago, WillCful said:

I guess I don’t know a lot about how the epoxy paint systems work... I haven’t painted on the red oxide yet, the first step is I’m taking it back to bare steel and going from there. I need more information if I’m going to use epoxy. Currently considering the red oxide and then Hammerite, my impression of hammerite is that it’s a pain to work with but hard wearing when it’s on.

Two pack epoxies are more technical paints than single part paints which you can just slap on. You need to have a very well prepared steel surface, mix it in the correct proportions, mix it very well and pay good attention to the minimum and maximum overcoating times.

 

https://www.jotun.com/Datasheets/Download?url=%2FTDS%2FTDS__16560__Jotamastic+90__Euk__GB.pdf

 

If you were painting the inside of a steel hull below the waterline you'd need the winter grade hardener. 

 

 

 

Edited by blackrose
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3 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Isn't that a bit of an oxymoron? 

 

As I understood it, red oxide is a rust inhibiting primer designed for application to bare steel. 

 

Is this perhaps a gloss top coat the same colour as red oxide primer? 

 

 

There is indeed a red oxide top coat, it was popular where I used to work, I think its aimed at those people who like the red oxide look, I suppose it was the fore-runner of Craftmaster Raddle Red.

 

..............Dave

23 hours ago, WillCful said:

I guess I don’t know a lot about how the epoxy paint systems work... I haven’t painted on the red oxide yet, the first step is I’m taking it back to bare steel and going from there. I need more information if I’m going to use epoxy. Currently considering the red oxide and then Hammerite, my impression of hammerite is that it’s a pain to work with but hard wearing when it’s on.

If you have clean bare metal and plan to keep the boat for a while then epoxy is the way to go (Jotun Jotamastic?), otherwise a good zinc primer (BondaPrimer?) and then a top coat, I would use Danboline rather than Hammerirte,  Danboline is for boats, Hammerite is for garden gates ?

 

................Dave

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