Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
blackrose

TV signal suddenly disappeared

Featured Posts

On 26/03/2020 at 10:47, Onewheeler said:

 

Those Belling-Lee tv connectors are extremely crap. Avoid as much as possible.

So are F type.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, blackrose said:

I've never had a problem with self-amalgamating tape that's outside breaking down because of UV absorption. On the other hand I have had problems with the adhesive of electrical insulating tape going gooey over time and just becoming a nasty mess. Perhaps you've been using poor quality self-amalgamating tape and I've been using poor quality insulating tape?

I've not had any issues with self-amalg breaking down, but I've been overwrapping it with good quality insulating tape for 40 years or more. I recently took down an antenna which had been on the mast for at least twenty years and the connectors were still bright and shiny. Professionally, I believe that Denso tape is a preferred overcoating, but it's foul stuff to handle and to remove. It's also said by some that there should be a base coat of insulating tape as self-amalgamating doesn't stick to metal. Of course, every layer should overlap the one beneath it by a turn or two. The last two turns of insulating tape shouldn't be wound under tension as it may tend to unfurl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Onewheeler said:

It's also said by some that there should be a base coat of insulating tape as self-amalgamating doesn't stick to metal. 

 

In that case I think "some" may have misunderstood how to use self-amalgamating tape. It's designed to stick to itself, so you simply take a tight turn around the metal fitting while holding it in place and then begin to stick it to itself. It doesn't need any base coat of insulating tape. I can't help thinking that some people are over-complicating things.

  • Greenie 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, blackrose said:

 

In that case I think "some" may have misunderstood how to use self-amalgamating tape. It's designed to stick to itself, so you simply take a tight turn around the metal fitting while holding it in place and then begin to stick it to itself. It doesn't need any base coat of insulating tape. I can't help thinking that some people are over-complicating things.

I'd agree that it's more complicated than necessary. Empirical experience here says that two layers suffices for anything needed. My antennae are in exposed locations about 250 m asl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Onewheeler said:

I've not had any issues with self-amalg breaking down, but I've been overwrapping it with good quality insulating tape for 40 years or more. I recently took down an antenna which had been on the mast for at least twenty years and the connectors were still bright and shiny. Professionally, I believe that Denso tape is a preferred overcoating, but it's foul stuff to handle and to remove. It's also said by some that there should be a base coat of insulating tape as self-amalgamating doesn't stick to metal. Of course, every layer should overlap the one beneath it by a turn or two. The last two turns of insulating tape shouldn't be wound under tension as it may tend to unfurl.

 

During my 41 year career I have always specified that buried mild steel pipes, used as diesel fuel lines, be wrapped in Denso self-amalgamating tape before the trench is infilled.

 

On some projects we have recovered Denso wrapped diesel pipweork over 30 years old and it has always remained stuck to the metal pipework, which in turn has remained rust free, despite being in damp soil for decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used to Denso tape car leaf springs, I had a mate who worked for GPO telephones. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.