Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
DandV

Tonic required. Send in your photos of what is nice on the waterways now.

Featured Posts

15 minutes ago, bagginz said:

An absolutely gorgeous ship, but photoshopped surely?   Maximum rig aloft, all sails catching wind but only a few hundred yards off the beach, no bow wave, not heeled over. 

No an actual photo taken by me from a tender. They put all the sails up if possible and then have one of the tenders out so that the passengers can take photos. In the background are the Pictons on St Lucia.

Commercials still working in France. Yesterday at Berry au Bac loaded grain for Belgium

33F13217-6AFD-4E0B-8675-64FBA71175BB.jpeg

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

No an actual photo taken by me from a tender. They put all the sails up if possible and then have one of the tenders out so that the passengers can take photos. 

Ah ok, that explains it.

 

As I said, an absolutely beautiful ship.   My commiserations in your trip being cancelled, you must be gutted.  I would love to crew on a ship like that - especially around the Caribbean.  

 

 

 

Edited by bagginz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ship is called Royal Clipper and as well as the Caribbean we have been across the Atlantic on her from Lisbon to Barbados and one night purely under sail exceeded 18 knots when the mate chickened out and took some sail off. For 2 nights because of the heeling we slept across the bed rather than fore and aft. Most of the deck officers and senior deck crew are from Russia and the Baltic states as they still have (had) training on their tall ships.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

 we have been across the Atlantic on her from Lisbon to Barbados and one night purely under sail exceeded 18 knots when the mate chickened out and took some sail off. For 2 nights because of the heeling we slept across the bed rather than fore and aft.

Superb 👍

 

7 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

one night purely under sail exceeded 18 knots when the mate chickened out and took some sail off. 

 Blimey 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_20200327_194252_848.jpg.bfcf044bfb28239a44f6a56747dffb24.jpg

 

Sunset on the River Thames, midsummer's eve

Edited by bagginz
  • Love 1
  • Happy 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the European inland waterways photos, and photos of other peoples off shore boating, and on shore UK lives and countryside. 

I enjoy the diversion from "The News"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On this day in 2011 I Woke up to find th is "swimming" next to the boat.

 

 

DSCF2027.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/03/2020 at 19:30, WhiteSuit said:

_DSC0217.JPG.422f47acdf41ad8d42ac240e5c70d2fa.JPG

 On 22/03/2020 at 20:32, WhiteSuit said:

Sad days, love the sound even if a non attendee.

 

On 22/03/2020 at 20:40, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Should you fancy learning to ring the bells, being a churchgoer is not mandatory. Most ringers are not.

Sadly, another silent Sunday, and no chance of the regular teaching of new bellringers. Sadly, too I haven't any recordings of the bells of Braunston, so here is St Michael's Southampton, where we learnt as students and by chance was on the BBC's Bells on Sunday last week. 

 

Back to Braunston, here is a picture from Duncan Davis's excellent coffee-table book BRAUNSTON andBACK of Elaine (swmbo) posing in Braunston's ringing chamber with her rope and sally, in Duncan's description "in full regalia". Also in the picture is Peter Wenham, tower captain at Braunston, who died in 2015. This was brought to mind by the Channel5 programme Celebrity Britain By Barge  (Episode5 from 50'50" in), when Braunston vicar Rev Nat White remembered Elaine's ringing as a link to the old boating communities. Having a TV neither at home nor on the boat it was happenstance to be watching the programme live in a flat in Scotland a fortnight ago. In these isolationist days, a fortnight of days seems a long time ago.

 

P3297881.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This bit of canal is not much wider than the GU

IMG_0712.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Briare aqueduct over the Loire by M. Effiel. The staircase at Rogny les 7 ecluses where they have a major firework display using the locks

21075066-FE7D-41A2-A0DA-51086B94FC55.jpeg

AA046082-E386-4A8D-8027-47062C69279E.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On this day in 2018 Coventry Canal. The famous boat is the one in the middle: the floating pontoon. MiltonMaid which once moved pottery beween factories on the CaldonCanal

L2758_20180329_0002.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, PeterScott said:

On this day in 2018 Coventry Canal. The famous boat is the one in the middle: the floating pontoon. MiltonMaid which once moved pottery beween factories on the CaldonCanal

L2758_20180329_0002.JPG

When did the pottery boat trade stop? 

I remember being taken on a canal side walk in Stoke in 1975 or early 1976, through the potteries, and from my recollection of the canal side features, probably the lower Caldon. At this point my recollection is more suspect, but either from then, or other sources, can recall a narrowboat, along side on the factory side either in use or recently retired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DandV said:

When did the pottery boat trade stop? I remember being taken on a canal side walk in Stoke in 1975 or early 1976, through the potteries, and from my recollection of the canal side features, probably the lower Caldon. At this point my recollection is more suspect, but either from then, or other sources, can recall a narrowboat, along side on the factory side either in use or recently retired.

Wikipedia says "... in an unusual move Johnson Brothers built in 1960 three new, specialized barges, named Milton Princess, Milton Maid and Milton Queen, to convey pottery over a 2.5-mile (4 km) stretch of the canal from its factory in Milton to a new packaging plant near the Ivy House lift bridge in Hanley. The experiment was a huge success. Transport by water reduced costs by 50 per cent and diminished the number of breakages of wares. Operation continued until 1990, becoming one of the last commercial narrowboat runs." and this is a picture of a not-loaded boat from our Caldon trip in 1977. 

L01052.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Dav and Pen said:

The Briare aqueduct over the Loire by M. Effiel. The staircase at Rogny les 7 ecluses where they have a major firework display using the locks

21075066-FE7D-41A2-A0DA-51086B94FC55.jpeg

AA046082-E386-4A8D-8027-47062C69279E.jpeg

We went over that aqueduct in a hire boat last year.Alas, looks as if we shan't be boating in France this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, PeterScott said:

Wikipedia says "... in an unusual move Johnson Brothers built in 1960 three new, specialized barges, named Milton Princess, Milton Maid and Milton Queen, to convey pottery over a 2.5-mile (4 km) stretch of the canal from its factory in Milton to a new packaging plant near the Ivy House lift bridge in Hanley. The experiment was a huge success. Transport by water reduced costs by 50 per cent and diminished the number of breakages of wares. Operation continued until 1990, becoming one of the last commercial narrowboat runs." and this is a picture of a not-loaded boat from our Caldon trip in 1977. 

L01052.jpg

Thanks Peter. My recollection was of watching a very utilitarian  barge being loaded, and we did see more then one barge, so it is reassuring to me that not all of my memory neurons have degraded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.