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DandV

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5 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

Used to travel on that train daily when it was operating on "the drain" (Waterloo & City Line).

I thought the rolling stock operated on "the drain" was British Rail of an even smaller diameter, and nicknamed The "pea shooter" ?

This rolling stock looks like the old bakerloo line stock of the mid 1970's and out at Epping on the end of the central line.

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On 23/05/2020 at 21:14, PeterScott said:

On this yesterday in 2009 - Ryde IOW [photodate was 24May2009, btw]L1539_20090524_0017a.jpg.fb44b3a80cdeaaacc7984b41512d935e.jpg

14 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

Used to travel on that train daily when it was operating on "the drain" (Waterloo & City Line).

8 hours ago, DandV said:

I thought the rolling stock operated on "the drain" was British Rail of an even smaller diameter, and nicknamed The "pea shooter" ?

This rolling stock looks like the old bakerloo line stock of the mid 1970's and out at Epping on the end of the central line.

They are very similar shapes. Wiki says the draintrain is a British Rail Class 487 and there were twelve built in 1940 for the drain, which had no rail connection to any other railway. Ryde pier had old tubetrains for many years. Described here.

 

 

spacer.pngL1539_20090524_0015a.jpg.cdd6ceee304ae8baa90fe481932ea60f.jpg

 

Edited by PeterScott
another link

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On this day in 2014

L2175_20140525_0001d.jpg.f04565cd48640884f09e7004d4be0b4d.jpg

 

Cassiobridge GUSouth

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That's an underground bridge, 168A btw

 

Also #1124

 

Edited by PeterScott
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3 hours ago, PeterScott said:

Wiki says the draintrain is a British Rail Class 487 and there were twelve built in 1940 for the drain, which had no rail connection to any other railway.

Yes it did. There was an underground siding at Waterloo off the Waterloo & City Iine which led to a lift which took carriages, one at a time, up to the main line level, where they could then be taken away via the mainline. This was removed when the International Terminal was built. At the same time the W&C underground depot was modified to allow carriages to be lifted through the roof and delivered/taken away by road.

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On this day in 2012

L1871_20120525_0003a.jpg.b9f94203b78b3720357d2a1a8e20fb28.jpg

 

Blow Up Bridge Regents Canal

aspacer.pngka Macclesfield Bridge No 9

 

Canalplan says

The nickname 'Blow-up Bridge' commemorates an accident here just before 5 o'clock in the morning of Friday 2nd October 1874. Five boats were being towed by a steam powered tug; one of them, the 'Tilbury', was carrying a cargo of about five tons of gunpowder, and as it passed under the bridge, the gunpowder caught fire and there was an explosion which completely destroyed the bridge. Its cast-iron columns were re-used when the bridge was re-built, and were turned through 180 degrees; the rope grooves that were originally on the canal side, can still be seen on the inside from the towpath; there were subsequently new rope grooves worn on the canal side of the columns.

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2 hours ago, David Mack said:

Yes it did. There was an underground siding at Waterloo off the Waterloo & City Iine which led to a lift which took carriages, one at a time, up to the main line level, where they could then be taken away via the mainline. This was removed when the International Terminal was built. At the same time the W&C underground depot was modified to allow carriages to be lifted through the roof and delivered/taken away by road.

The Armstrong Lift in 1988. It was demolished in 1992 or 93.

800px-Waterloo_Depot_Armstrong_lift_(198

  • Greenie 1

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6 hours ago, PeterScott said:

On this day 2019

P5259527a.jpg.b18476e2a04acd8bd5159edd138df889.jpg

Liverpool Docks

 

Changed a bit since I was there in 1969.

1969 Albert Dock 257.jpg

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1 hour ago, Pluto said:

Changed a bit since I was there [Liverpool Docks] in 1969

Similar time with a lot of mud (Bob Keaveney's old pic)

35s.jpg.8ce4085411bbde6c05249b81a8f68568.jpg

And 2012

35_P9080819s.JPG.ba4b36021d1429072675d61daff531d7.JPG

Edited by PeterScott

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More mud in front of Liver building (Bob Keaveney's old pic)

29s.jpg.135c2923a499ded81205c2803cb276e7.jpg

And 201229_P9080769s.JPG.231271bec79f0e5f00da89c916df3ba2.JPG

Edited by PeterScott

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It being sunny today I trust some photos in the rain can be excused. Here, at Champs-sur-Yonne, is one of the hardest locks to get into when the river is running. A strong sideways set takes a vessel towards the jetty, so you approach close to the towpath, then turn at an angle.

 

Barges here were made of far thinner metal than narrowboats ever are, so, with a full-width vessel it pays to be careful. I once saw a laded Dutch freighter taken sideways here. The steerer saved the day by easing the vessel forward until the starboard side of the bow was just inside the lock. Meanwhile his pal dropped a tyre in at the stern against the jetty. They then just pivoted the boat straight against the lock entrance using the engine.

 

To add to the show their Alsatian dog stood with its paws on the wheel as if it had done the whole thing itself. 

CNV00121.jpg

CNV00123.jpg

  • Greenie 1

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On this day in 2013

L2016_20130525_0175.JPG.f852d635b47aa764f4b2c0a0e00bb4f8.JPG

Curdworth Locks B&F BCN

Edited by PeterScott

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I remember that lock at Champs sur Yonne for the lovely cherries that where on sale there at one time.

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2 hours ago, PeterScott said:

On this day in 2008

L1444_20080525_0038.JPG.6b0d231316674faa2683858d1bcf09e4.JPG

 

RochdaleC towards Luddendenfoot

That would be when there was a cafe operating under those canopies on the right just before the bridge. The shop at street level was operating as an antique/junk shop and you could wander through the old furniture, down some rickety steps to the basement, also full of furniture, and out onto the canalside where you sat on old chairs (for sale) at an old table (also for sale) and took your drinks and light refreshments on an assoŕtment of mismatched old crockery (from house clearances). It was a charming place, but sadly didn't last long.

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26 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

I remember that lock at Champs sur Yonne for the lovely cherries that where on sale there at one time.

It's a big cherry area, much enjoyed, many times!

 

One thing I did not mention was that the standard way of negotiating this lock in times of flood was to tie to the bank then work the vessel through by hand. That came to an end when the bollards on the towpath were removed to make it easier for the grasscutting tractor.

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14 hours ago, PeterScott said:

Wiki says the draintrain [Waterloo and City Line] had no rail connection to any other railway. ...

11 hours ago, David Mack said:

Yes it did. There was an underground siding at Waterloo off the Waterloo & City Iine which led to a lift which took carriages, one at a time, up to the main line level,

On which theme, here is the excellent road from Tarbert across Loch Fyne to Portavadie 🙂P3069853t.jpg.cbf994890d36f166a161dbfc9173642b.jpg

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Nivernais canal Sardy flight coming down from the summit. A real mixture of gates and paddle gear. Some paddles wind up to open other wind down during the summer students work the locks and if they haven’t really looked carefully they manage to empty the pound as there can be both kinds of paddle on the same lock.

A9D7D036-AFFC-45C3-9BD3-3E132CBAB3DE.jpeg

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3 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

Nivernais canal Sardy flight coming down from the summit. A real mixture of gates and paddle gear. Some paddles wind up to open other wind down during the summer students work the locks and if they haven’t really looked carefully they manage to empty the pound as there can be both kinds of paddle on the same lock.

A9D7D036-AFFC-45C3-9BD3-3E132CBAB3DE.jpeg

The mixture of equipment on the flight stems from the days when local resistance members would sabotage the locks. To keep traffic moving the German occupying forces used whatever sluices they could find.

 

Another occupation story is that the railway that accompanies the Canal dy Nivernais once had double tracks, until one set was taken off and moved across Europe, it is said,  for use in Roumania. 

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11 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I think CRT should have student lockies in place of the crusties

In normal times (remember those?) the Nivernais management employs students to operate the locks in the tourist season, giving them serious instruction beforehand. And in my observation it works very well.

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