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DandV

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With mechanisation and the need to save on wages, lock-keepers are a threatened species in France. Their disappearance will be the visitor's loss. From the rich range of personalities encountered, three examples:

 

On the Canal de l'Est, the Yonne, the southern Nivernais at Cercy-la-Tour.

 

The last picture records my own introduction to waterways in France,. In 1967 Peter Zivy lent me a boat in exchange for a series of articles I would write extolling the delights of leisure cruising, then an unknown concept to those in the corridors of power.

 

Peter's own company, deliberately sited at the summit of the Nivernais, had six boats only.and at that time was the only hire company on the inland waterways of France He lost a lot of money, but he saved the canal.

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36 minutes ago, PeterScott said:

On this day in 2014

 

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spacer.pngChain Bridge, River Dee

 

The Chain Bridge looked like that last time I was there. Apparently it was closed for more than 30 years, but happily reopened in 2015.

 

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https://uk.ramboll.com/projects/ruk/chain-bridge

Edited by David Mack
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6 hours ago, Dav and Pen said:

There still a few canals with manual locks. The lock keeper on the Sambre in Belgium with a young helper and with the gear broken a brute force solution

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 Locks on the Nivernais are all still hand-winders, with a sprinkling of single-handed keepers covering several at a time. In high summer it gets better, with, part-timers recruited,. Often students, which  works well. But if remote control takes over a valuable feature will be lost.

 

Apologies for repeating a photo used earlier,  but on the like of the upper Seine, where the operator sits in an office miles away, with fences all around and communication by  radio, it is all too spooky for me. The house in the picture is unoccupied.

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Edited by John Liley
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11 hours ago, John Liley said:

 

 Locks on the Nivernais are all still hand-winders, with a sprinkling of single-handed keepers covering several at a time. In high summer it gets better, with, part-timers recruited,. Often students, which  works well. But if remote control takes over a valuable feature will be lost.

 

Apologies for repeating a photo used earlier,  but on the like of the upper Seine, where the operator sits in an office miles away, with fences all around and communication by  radio, it is all too spooky for me. The house in the picture is unoccupied.

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Some years ago we went through this lock and the lock keeper asked me into the office to see his collection of photos. He was a real enthusiast and had lots of photos of ice breaking and peniches over the years. These remote controlled locks are really scary and also spooky when you can’t see anybody and suddenly the gates shut or the paddles open. The one on the Yonne at Grugy is really nasty as the paddles seem to open full straight away and there real strong turbulence . A really. Big lock at Bosserveld in the Nederlands is controlled from miles away and you get shouted at over the Tannoy.

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My first (and only) encounter with remotely-controlled locks was in a sight-seeing boat in Strasbourg in the mid-1990's. I had assumed they were operated by remote control from the boat as there was no sign humans on land and no tannoy announcements, but I suppose it could have been done from a remote control centre in response to a request from the boat by radio.

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This is the remotely controlled lock at Bosscheveld (got spelling right) near Masstricht. It leads from the Zuid Willemstad canal to the R Mass. although it is unmanned it does not work on Sundays although the locks on the Mass do. Not knowing this I spent some time on the radio calling before some one answered with Kaput on Sunday.

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On this day in 2019

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Lady Hatherton at Great Haywood T&M  "In 1967 due to the very poor condition of the hull it was decided after much consultation with Mr.Les Allen of Oldbury that a new hull should be built. This was constructed in the Oldbury yard, to the exact design of the old using the same method of building. A three cylinder Lister was installed and the new hull then moved to the top lock at Lapworth. In the meanwhile the roof of the boat had been hacksawed through below the gunwale;long beams had been put through the windows fixed by U bolts to lower beams lipped under the gunwale. It was thus intended to lower the water in the lock so that the underside of the longbeams rested on the lock sides, the weight of the roof being supported by the beams under the gunwales; then empty the lock completely and float out the old hull; bring in the new and fill thelock to marry the roof to its new mate. This anxious operation took all day ... it was very satisfying when the two sections fitted perfectly together. How Les Allen was able to judge his measurements so exactly we shall never know."

Edited by PeterScott
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On this day in 2019

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Great Haywood T&M/S&W

 

Compare #3852 (1995)

#527 (2001) #4303 #5425 (2003)

#4283 #4291 (2004) #4651 (2007)

#3586 (2012) #699 #2712 (2013)

#3918 (2014) #3580 (2015)

#3989 (2016) #1945 (2019)

 

More twentythirds of March

 

Posting this day 2020:Robin

 

 

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Edited by PeterScott
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