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StephenA

Boat Safety and Coronavirus

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So with places being closed and "non-essential" travel being discouraged does anyone know what C&RT are doing about boats with expiring safety certs?  I assume that they're just going to say that you have to get one done.

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As you need one to comply with your license conditions my guess is you are right.

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11 minutes ago, StephenA said:

So with places being closed and "non-essential" travel being discouraged does anyone know what C&RT are doing about boats with expiring safety certs?  I assume that they're just going to say that you have to get one done.

You get lots of notice and can get it done up to 4 months in advance, but a lot of excuse really.

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As it is essential to have a certificate, then it sounds like it would not be non-essential (apologies for the double negative) to organise it. I guess the guy doing the BSS needs the work still.

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I had mine last week, I needed gas work done, it took me months to find a fitter, eventually found a BSC/gassafe fitter. Still a tiny bit of other work to be done, seven days to go before expiry.

CRT "helpline" not geared up to deal with technical matters. They don't tell you who to contact in CRT.

Edited by LadyG

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Ours is booked to be done a few days before it expires which is in a couple of weeks as that was when it fitted to get it done. Hopefully the examiner will still travel to do it. I had the same thought though if he doesn't want to come and do it I will need to speak to CRT and the insurance company to explain the circumstances and see what they say.

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I cant understand why people leave it so late. The thing can be done months early and still run from the official expiry date.

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1 hour ago, StephenA said:

So with places being closed and "non-essential" travel being discouraged does anyone know what C&RT are doing about boats with expiring safety certs?  I assume that they're just going to say that you have to get one done.

 

if the examiner drives to the boat and you leave him alone I can't see what the problem is. With most surveyors being self employed I can't see many cancelling

 

 

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1 hour ago, matty40s said:

You get lots of notice and can get it done up to 4 months in advance, but a lot of excuse really.

Is that the case and where did you find this info? I looked for this information last week and could not find mention of the 4 months overlap.

 

I need a BSS in the next month. I had not appreciated that this virus was going to take off this quickly and don't really want somebody putting their hands all over the boat 😀. We are just getting to the age where the risks start going up.

 

Is it rude to ask the BSS man to wash his hands before we let him in? 😀

 

...............Dave

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Just get him to wear latex gloves. My nursing daughter has just sent us some surgical quality gloves with instructions to wear them when out. Now we know we’re old!

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2 hours ago, StephenA said:

 I assume that they're just going to say that you have to get one done.

Why should they say anything else ?

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16 minutes ago, dmr said:

Is that the case and where did you find this info? I looked for this information last week and could not find mention of the 4 months overlap.

 

I need a BSS in the next month. I had not appreciated that this virus was going to take off this quickly and don't really want somebody putting their hands all over the boat 😀. We are just getting to the age where the risks start going up.

 

Is it rude to ask the BSS man to wash his hands before we let him in? 😀

 

...............Dave

I had an email reminder from CRT and I'm sure it stated it could be carried out up to 2 months before the due date.

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1 hour ago, matty40s said:

I cant understand why people leave it so late. The thing can be done months early and still run from the official expiry date.

 

16 minutes ago, dmr said:

Is that the case and where did you find this info?

 

I believe it used to be 4 months but has been reduced to 2 months.

 

From the BSS website :

 

Make arrangements in advance

You can book an examination up to (but not exceeding) two months before your old BSS certification runs out (or RCD Declaration of Conformity recognition for licensing purposes).

If your boat passes with two months or less left on your existing certification, the examiner will post-date the new certificate to start from the date when either the old one expired;  the fourth anniversary of the DoC or first-year date of the Annex IIIa document.

This means you do not lose any of the full four-year, or one-year validity of the existing document as relevant.

We recommend taking advantage of this facility, because if your boat fails for any reason, you will still have some time to put things right.

The BSS calls this process forward dating - the full detail is here Advance Booking of Examinations

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4 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

I believe it used to be 4 months but has been reduced to 2 months.

I wonder when that changed ? I found a reference on the interweb  from 2015 saying it was 2 months .

 

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I reckon that with the predicted total breakdown of ordinary life going unlicensed for a few months would be the least of anyone's worries considering the fact that huge swathes of the population are going to wake up at night struggling to breathe. 

 

Pneumonia is really nasty as anyone who has had it badly will know. 

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

Just get him to wear latex gloves. My nursing daughter has just sent us some surgical quality gloves with instructions to wear them when out. Now we know we’re old!

A lot of advice I have seen advises against latex gloves and to instead rely on better washing. Gloves can pick up viruses just as hands can, which can then either be passed to surfaces by someone wearing them or to yourself just as your hands would. They can be a false sense of security. In medical settings they will be changing them very regularly and also aware of safe removal and disposal of the gloves. 

  • Greenie 1

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Are boat safety examiners  known to be putting work on hold? 

I heard there was a shortage of examiners - perhaps that's the problem, not the virus ?

 

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47 minutes ago, magnetman said:

I reckon that with the predicted total breakdown of ordinary life going unlicensed for a few months would be the least of anyone's worries considering the fact that huge swathes of the population are going to wake up at night struggling to breathe. 

 

 

Just please do not moor on a water point for a couple of months!

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8 hours ago, Dr Bob said:

Just please do not moor on a water point for a couple of months!

 

Yes, we don't want CMers to have yet another excuse....

 

"Dear CRT, I have to stay here on the water point for another month because now the bird's nest has gone, I've got rook flu' and I can't breathe....

 

  • Greenie 1
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12 hours ago, Ianws said:

A lot of advice I have seen advises against latex gloves and to instead rely on better washing. Gloves can pick up viruses just as hands can, which can then either be passed to surfaces by someone wearing them or to yourself just as your hands would. They can be a false sense of security. In medical settings they will be changing them very regularly and also aware of safe removal and disposal of the gloves. 

I use latex gloves in the workshop all the time, and regularly have to change them if they become contaminated with paint, oil, etc. It is quite easy to remove them without touching the outside, but as long as you wash your hands immediately after removing them you should be ok.

 

 

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer

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12 hours ago, magnetman said:

I reckon that with the predicted total breakdown of ordinary life going unlicensed for a few months would be the least of anyone's worries considering the fact that huge swathes of the population are going to wake up at night struggling to breathe. 

 

Pneumonia is really nasty as anyone who has had it badly will know. 

 

 

But won't the boat also be uninsured as a result?

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7 minutes ago, Traveller said:

But won't the boat also be uninsured as a result?

Having a canal  license is not a condition of insurance. 

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7 minutes ago, Traveller said:

But won't the boat also be uninsured as a result?

If your insurance says that a BSSC (or equivalent) is required, then yes it probably is invalidated.

 

If it is not a requirement of your insurers then you should be OK

1 minute ago, MartynG said:

Having a canal  license is not a condition of insurance. 

The subject of the topic is not having a BSSC

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1 hour ago, David Schweizer said:

I use latex gloves in the workshop all the time, and regularly have to change them if they become contaminated with paint, oil, etc. It is quite easy to remove them without touching the outside, but as long as you wash your hands immediately after removing them you should be ok.

 

 

 

 

But that is to protect hour hands. AFAIK, the coronavirus does not infect via the hands but when those hands touch facial features. Gloves do not make much impact, as I see it.

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