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RedsfanUk

Just had survey on potential boat.

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1 minute ago, RedsfanUk said:

Ok thanks put my mind at ease abit. Honestly didn't realise 😕 would delete it if I could. 

Don’t worry about it in the slightest. Why would the surveyor care in the slightest? It’s not like you’ve named him and queried his expertise, simply quoted a few points. 
 

While I’m here, I’ll observe that that would be a reasonable survey for a 30 year old boat but it’s a bit poor for a 9 year old one. 

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3 minutes ago, blackrose said:

If someone commissions and pays for a survey and a survey report doesn't at least part of the copyright then rest with the person who paid for it?

 

I've no idea as I'm not a copyright lawyer, but unlike a book or scientific paper the entire survey report is paid for by the customer so I'd have thought the surveyor's copyright clause wouldn't stand up in court. Happy to be corrected though.

 

Proper surveys carry a boilerplate disclaimer about copying them because of professional liability issues - the report is solely for the client who commissioned it, and no third party can make any sort of claim on the surveyor.

 

While the report is technically copyrighted at the time of creation, I doubt it's the main concern of the person signing it.

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1 minute ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

You can pay for a photographer and not get copyright on the images (unless you pay extra). A report would be analogous. 

Ok I see. Then I guess the OP is screwed!😂

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1 minute ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

You can pay for a photographer and not get copyright on the images (unless you pay extra). A report would be analogous. 

Be careful of sweeping statements like that which can be very misleading.
 

It entirely depends upon the agreement at the time the photographer is commissioned. I can assure you that I own the copyright on all imagery that I have commissioned over the last 20-odd years. 

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1 minute ago, WotEver said:

Be careful of sweeping statements like that which can be very misleading.
 

It entirely depends upon the agreement at the time the photographer is commissioned. I can assure you that I own the copyright on all imagery that I have commissioned over the last 20-odd years. 

I said 'can'... as in 'it is possible'. I didn't say 'always'. 

 

Be careful with misreading. It can be very misleading 🙂

 

I can assure you that I own the copyright of some, but not all, of the photography i have commissioned over the last 20+ years. 

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1 hour ago, LadyG said:

If it has not been well maintained since new, unless the price is already discounted, then consider that annual maintenance should cost £500 pa.

I do not like the style of the report.

I wish it was that cheap. In less than 3 years I spent £34k on maintenance - and this was a boat that I'd owned for 25 years since new and maintained to the fullest standard throughout.

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6 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

I wish it was that cheap. In less than 3 years I spent £34k on maintenance - and this was a boat that I'd owned for 25 years since new and maintained to the fullest standard throughout.

Be better to sell that one and start again!

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Just now, LadyG said:

Be better to sell that one and start again!

With hindsight yes, at the start of the 3 years it was valued at £48k and afterwards at £46k. OTOH it was the boat we had designed exactly as we wanted, and it would be difficult to find another that suited us the same way.

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49 minutes ago, RedsfanUk said:

Ok thanks put my mind at ease abit. Honestly didn't realise 😕 would delete it if I could. 

Dont worry about quoting it, the surveyors name and boat name are not identifiable from the quote.

Looks like a Michael Clarke survey😁.

 

I would be concerned with the hull-side pitting, very deep for a 9 year old boat, and indeed could make insuring fully comprehensive quite difficult.....a good bargaining point, and possible good enough reason to walk away getting your deposit back.

At least you've had the survey prior to purchase.

 

This boat has just been purchased(Jan), and the owners for some reason, have decided to get a survey (for peace of mind!!)....and blacking. It has the most extensive galvanic corrosion I have seen (bar 2 feet round each anode), and theres 70 feet of it.

 

 

20200214_161845.jpg

20200214_161914.jpg

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It hadn't been pressure washed and was covered in mussels do I cannot give a valid opinion being a stranger on an internet board.....😎

 

Let you know Monday after the survey.

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43 minutes ago, matty40s said:

It hadn't been pressure washed and was covered in mussels do I cannot give a valid opinion being a stranger on an internet board.....😎

 

Let you know Monday after the survey.

I’ve often wondered, can you eat freshwater mussels?

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1 minute ago, WotEver said:

I’ve often wondered, can you eat freshwater mussels?

Many many years ago we did, but they were out of  spring fed stream on a clean sandy bottom. I would not eat anything out of the canal.

 

The canal mussels  tend to be Zebra mussels which are pretty small. They are filter feeders and filter about 1 litre per day absorbing all of the impurities out of the water.

I'd have thought they'd be fairly polluted with heavy metals, petrochemicals etc.

 

No thank you.

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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

Many many years ago we did, but they were out of  spring fed stream on a clean sandy bottom. I would not eat anything out of the canal.

 

The canal mussels  tend to be Zebra mussels which are pretty small. They are filter feeders and filter about 1 litre per day absorbing all of the impurities out of the water.

I'd have thought they'd be fairly polluted with heavy metals, petrochemicals etc.

 

No thank you.

I’ll take that as a no then ;)

 

I was talking to a surveyor many years ago where he’d been at a boatyard down south somewhere. A yoghurt pot was booked in to investigate why it was travelling so slowly despite the outboard apparently running sweetly. It was sorely due for antifoul so they thought they’d do that first. That’s when they found a layer over 2ft thick of mussels that were dragging through the mud. 

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4 hours ago, matty40s said:

 

This boat has just been purchased(Jan), and the owners for some reason, have decided to get a survey (for peace of mind!!)....and blacking. It has the most extensive galvanic corrosion I have seen (bar 2 feet round each anode), and theres 70 feet of it.

 

 

20200214_161845.jpg

20200214_161914.jpg

 

So how do you distinguish galvanic corrosion from corrosion occuring as a result of 'normal' factors? I've spoken to a surveyor and a boat yard and they both told me they can't tell one from the other simply by looking at it. Unless you're just attributing premature corrosion to galvanic action? Again, I'm not sure that's as clear cut as we might like to think.

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10 hours ago, Keeping Up said:

With hindsight yes, at the start of the 3 years it was valued at £48k and afterwards at £46k. OTOH it was the boat we had designed exactly as we wanted, and it would be difficult to find another that suited us the same way.

Those are incredible figures you are quoting Allan , did the fact that you designed your Boat have part to play in this staggering outlay ? I imagine Gold Leaf Motif can be pretty expensive😀

£34k in 3 years is for me an astounding figure .

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Normal corrosion occurs generally at the waterline, slow to occur, deep red/ brown colour and often results in delamination as it progresses. 

Galvanic corrosion occurs at all levels underwater, is typified by bright orange ''pustules' of rust in rashes, when washed off leaves bright silver pits. It normally doesnt happen near a working anode....here, less than 2 feet either side is protected.

20200214_161926.jpg

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10 hours ago, matty40s said:

This boat has just been purchased(Jan), and the owners for some reason, have decided to get a survey (for peace of mind!!)....and blacking. It has the most extensive galvanic corrosion I have seen (bar 2 feet round each anode), and theres 70 feet of it.

And this is a better plan than getting it surveyed before you buy it? 🤣

Edited by alan_fincher
Typo
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7 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

And this is a better plan than getting it surveyed before you but it? 🤣

I cant understand either, it's not as if they are new to boating having had at least 2 other narrowboats in the past.

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1 minute ago, matty40s said:

I cant understand either, it's not as if they are new to boating having had at least 2 other narrowboats in the past.

How old is it?

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1 minute ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I was wondering if they had come to insure it and found that the insurer wanted a survey.

That was my first thought Alan .

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I think anodes are only useful near the bronze propeller and associated different metals. The rudder on my boat is pitted and needs more or bigger anodes. Having said that I have had them on my boat from new but I will not replace most of them. Its all about the paint, in my experience paint stops pits deepening and should therefore stop them developing. Steel is steel whether it is made into a skip or a boat and steel + water and oxygen will corrode. The bottom will do exactly the same but is also more likely to corrode from inside as well as water will collect there. Remember the pics of Titanic when it was discovered? Covered in 'rusticles', Total darkness, precious little oxygen and quietly rusting away. Bitumen paint is OK for a year or so but there is better stuff around now and it is the best, if not only, defence against corrosion and docking and painting every two or three years is best. Its not rocket science.

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