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'Eye level' oven


frahkn
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I intend to replace my cooker with a separate hob and raised oven.

 

I have asked before without much success - would anyone recommend any particular make of oven? I have looked at those commonly offered by chandlers and by caravan suppliers but there seems to be only a very limited range available.

 

Can I consider domestic ovens (as long as they have a flame failure mechanism) or would I have difficulty getting a gas-safe guy to fit on to a boat?

 

Thanks.

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An eye level oven will depend on how tall you are. ?

As @Boater Sam said, as long as it can be jetted for LPG and has flame failure devices it should be OK. Do you have mains available to power fans, ignition, etc? Ask your chosen boat qualifed gas fitter if they are happy with the  particular model before buying.

 

Jen

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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3 hours ago, Boater Sam said:

Remember it needs to be adaptable to Propane ( or Butane if you still use ) not all domestics will.

Many will have mains clocks, ignition, oven fans etc, Not intended for 12v.

 

But easily powered from a small inverter. 

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1 hour ago, robtheplod said:

We have a Newworld eye level oven/grill. Works well although as stated above its 240v for the ignition/light etc - we just use a separate lighter rather than fire up the inverter when out...

That works if it's not a type that must have a fan running whenever it's used.  Some of them need the fan.

 

 

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1 hour ago, robtheplod said:

We have a Newworld eye level oven/grill. Works well although as stated above its 240v for the ignition/light etc - we just use a separate lighter rather than fire up the inverter when out...

Thank you - this information (especially from experience) is exactly what I need.

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Yep - my first boat has a gas hob and oven which would have electric ignition but I use a match instead - works fine and boat has brand new BSC, no issues at all.

 

When looking at a new boat for live aboard I considered taking my (Stoves - small and lovely) gas cooker with me. Conversion kit was about 50 quid. So, lots cheaper than a new cooker, alhtough as it happens I've bought a boat with one I like as is.

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We have a domestic gas fan oven. Virtually all, if not all, available ovens have flame failure devices because they are required if in multiple occupancy building such as flats. There is no reason why such an oven can’t be installed in a boat, provided of course it is set up for lpg.

 

Our one does have a fan, ignition and light powered by 230v ac, but since we tend to leave the inverter on all the time, it isn’t a problem and obviously doesn’t use much power. Ours is a Beko, although I don’t think the model is still available.

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1 hour ago, nicknorman said:

We have a domestic gas fan oven. Virtually all, if not all, available ovens have flame failure devices because they are required if in multiple occupancy building such as flats. There is no reason why such an oven can’t be installed in a boat, provided of course it is set up for lpg.

 

Our one does have a fan, ignition and light powered by 230v ac, but since we tend to leave the inverter on all the time, it isn’t a problem and obviously doesn’t use much power. Ours is a Beko, although I don’t think the model is still available.

Thanks - useful.

2 hours ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

Yep - my first boat has a gas hob and oven which would have electric ignition but I use a match instead - works fine and boat has brand new BSC, no issues at all.

 

When looking at a new boat for live aboard I considered taking my (Stoves - small and lovely) gas cooker with me. Conversion kit was about 50 quid. So, lots cheaper than a new cooker, alhtough as it happens I've bought a boat with one I like as is.

Sorry, it's a bit late and I'm not entirely sober. Are either of the stoves mentioned eye level (non-hob) type? f so, what make are/were they?

 

Sorry to be a nuisance.

Edited by frahkn
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2 hours ago, nicknorman said:

Virtually all, if not all, available ovens have flame failure devices because they are required if in multiple occupancy building such as flats.

 

Not really. Flame supervision has been mandatory on ALL ovens since the dawn of time. Its only hobs and grills where there are situations in which it is not mandatory. E.g. in single-household houses. 

 

 

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8 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Not really. Flame supervision has been mandatory on ALL ovens since the dawn of time. Its only hobs and grills where there are situations in which it is not mandatory. E.g. in single-household houses. 

 

 

Ok well delete the “virtually”, and all after “devices” then. I’m sure the gas oven in our family home (bought in the early 1950s) didn’t have any sort of flame failure device. Lit it with a match and it went Woooomph and singed one’s eyebrows! Maybe the 1950s IS before the dawn of time?

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13 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

Ok well delete the “virtually”, and all after “devices” then. I’m sure the gas oven in our family home (bought in the early 1950s) didn’t have any sort of flame failure device. Lit it with a match and it went Woooomph and singed one’s eyebrows! Maybe the 1950s IS before the dawn of time?

 

Actually you might be right there, I have similar memories. But until about 20 years ago the flame supervision on an oven was all but useless and not obvious to the layman. It comprised turning the gas down to the 'tickover' setting if the thermostat on the flame supervision device got cold. So still an uncontrolled escape of gas! 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

 I’m sure the gas oven in our family home (bought in the early 1950s) didn’t have any sort of flame failure device. Lit it with a match and it went Woooomph and singed one’s eyebrows! Maybe the 1950s IS before the dawn of time?

MtB is an acknowledged expert in the sphere of gas appliances, and if he says it, I'll believe it. I do wonder though, about all those novels, plays etc. in which some poor so-and-so commits suicide by switching the gas oven on and putting their head in it. If I understand correctly, if the gas was not lit, it would stop coming out of the pipes/ holes/ whatever, so such a course of action would be impossible.

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So basically, when you lit the oven it was limited to the 'low' setting to start with. Once the sensor warmed up from the low flame, the high rate thermostat was enabled and the bigger size flame appeared. Your oven sounds as though it was lighting on the large size flame.

 

  

Just now, Athy said:

If I understand correctly, if the gas was not lit, it would stop coming out of the pipes/ holes/ whatever, so such a course of action would be impossible.

 

This is wrong, as explained above. 

 

 

And further, before the 1970s switch to north sea gas, we had 'town gas', of which a major constituent was carbon monoxide (CO), so sticking your head in a gas oven was a very effective method of 'ending it all'. Not many peeps realise CO burns beautifully and makes an excellent fuel. 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

  

 

This is wrong, as explained above. 

 

 

Our posts crossed. I was referring to your post no. 11 above.

So, people COULD put their head in a gas oven and asphyxiate?

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Just now, Athy said:

Our posts crossed. I was referring to your post no. 11 above.

So, people COULD put their head in a gas oven and asphyxiate?

 

Yes, in a round about way. CO poisoning IS asphyxiation of a sort.

 

 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Actually you might be right there, I have similar memories. But until about 20 years ago the flame supervision on an oven was all but useless and not obvious to the layman. It comprised turning the gas down to the 'tickover' setting if the thermostat on the flame supervision device got cold. So still an uncontrolled escape of gas! 

 

 

We’ve just replaced the lpg range cooker in the gliding club, which was probably about 20 years old. The main reason being that it had no FSD on the hob rings, and the control knobs had levers on them. The consequence being that whenever someone lent against the cooker, it was all too easy to inadvertently turn the ring on. No auto-ignition. Happened loads of times. The oven was as you describe, you turned it on and it was at a low gas flow until it lit and warmed the thermocouple, then it went to full flame. Since it had auto-ignition (unlike the hob rings) I don’t think it ever failed to light, but if it had done then presumably it would have continued to emit gas.

 

i was only a tiny child of 6’ or so when I left home in the 1970s but I seem to recall that that oven was straight to max gas flow. Hence the “Woooomph” if you were 2 seconds late in applying the match! Those were the days when one learnt to respect flame, gas etc by practical demonstration! I only got badly singed once, at which point I learnt the lesson. My current caravan gas oven (manual electric ignition), about 12 years old, is straight to max gas too.

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52 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

My current caravan gas oven (manual electric ignition), about 12 years old, is straight to max gas too.

 

That one either has electronic flame supervision then, or has a fault. 

 

 

Or both!

 

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14 hours ago, frahkn said:

Thanks - useful.

Sorry, it's a bit late and I'm not entirely sober. Are either of the stoves mentioned eye level (non-hob) type? f so, what make are/were they?

 

Sorry to be a nuisance.

Sadly not. But I'm sure you'll find one that can be used that way. I was surprised how easy the conversion kits were to come by.

Hope the head is feeling OK today!

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My current boat, my previous shared boat and no boat which I have ever hired, contained an eye level oven. So they are certainly not very common.

 

But I have seen many (verging on "a lot") boats which do.

 

Surely it cannot be difficult to obtain a few brand names to consider? Anything not common in chandlers and caravan dealers.

 

 

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