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Can someone explain what this mooring sign actually means.

Is it service mooring (water point) lock mooring only, or can you actually stop for one night ?

 

It's at the bottom of the foxton flight opposite the pubs. There are white bollards for the swing bridge (and water point I presume ?) Then space with rings for two boats.

 

We came down the flight late yesterday and stopped here with another boat but really not sure if we should have.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20191009_102849305.jpg

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Looks fairly obvious, the mooring where the post is, is for services, and there's a one day mooring to the right. It should be plain where, if you moor, you're going to obstruct those who want water, so avoid it. 

What one day is, is a matter of conjecture. It could be two nights and a day in between if you get there later and leave early, or it could be 24 hours from when you arrive. Noone knows and both are arguable. 

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1 minute ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Looks fairly obvious, the mooring where the post is, is for services, and there's a one day mooring to the right. It should be plain where, if you moor, you're going to obstruct those who want water, so avoid it. 

 

Yes, normally I would agree but from that post going to the right ( the direction of the arrow ) there are normal rings with space for two boats, then the white bollards for the swing bridge, just before the swing bridge is an identical post but with the arrow pointing left. 

 

Surely if it is service / lock mooring only they wouldn't have the one day free mooring sign. 

 

We have moved now but I think I need to wander back to the flight and ask the CRT volunteers.

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Better to go and tell them, if you must. It seems clear enough, if not CRT need better clearer signage. 

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58 minutes ago, waterdog said:

Can someone explain what this mooring sign actually means.

Is it service mooring (water point) lock mooring only, or can you actually stop for one night ?

 

It's at the bottom of the foxton flight opposite the pubs. There are white bollards for the swing bridge (and water point I presume ?) Then space with rings for two boats.

 

We came down the flight late yesterday and stopped here with another boat but really not sure if we should have.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20191009_102849305.jpg

It means that there is a one day VM between the post and the bridge waiting point. We moored there last year but I agree that our 70' boat would have been an inconvenience to water users or bridge users. Luckily the bridge was broken (and had been for a couple of years) so this was not an issue at the time.

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There are two water points and one single mooring here approaching the locks. The water points double up as lock landing, almost exactly the same as at Hawksbury but without the bend to the lock.  It can get confusing though as the boat moored at the end is often mistaken for a boat waiting for the lock.  As said whilst the swing bridge is broke use the mooring for that less confusing.

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I've gone onto the CRT website and they have a mooring map for the area. 

Apparently the bit in question is a water point mooring and lock waiting and swing bridge and an overnight ( one day mooring). 

 

Perhaps removing the word "only" from the service & lock mooring plaques would make it clearer or maybe I'm just being thick.

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28 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

How would one know that ?

 

There is additional signage saying so, I am aware of discussions regarding the legality of this but would rather not get involved in a legal argument with CRT. I would just like to understand the signage and avoid any hassle.

Edited by waterdog

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I see that charges will be made "if your boat does not move on after the maximum stay time".

How long after? Surely they mean "within". 

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46 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

To whom, where, & by what method do we pay ?

Well that's easy, just book it online in advance.....😎

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It appears you may go to court twice (or is it just the once but you get two judgements ?

 

"Extended stay charges will be invoiced monthly and recorded on your boat licence account.  Your account must be paid in full within 28 days. Debts will be recovered through our normal processes which may include obtaining a County Court judgment.judgment." 
 

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3 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

What one day is, is a matter of conjecture. It could be two nights and a day in between if you get there later and leave early, or it could be 24 hours from when you arrive. Noone knows and both are arguable. 

Actually I know, because I was directly involved in many meetings with CRT where this was repeatedly discussed.

 

It actually means that whatever day you arrive, and at whatever time, you must leave at some point the following day.

It would be far less ambiguous if the signs said "1 night" rather than "1 day", but those of us who argued the point to try and avoid the ambiguity sadly lost.

 

There wasn't a lot of sense from CRT throughout the whole "South East Visitor Moorings" debate, unfortunately.

 

Foxton signage has repeatedly been cited in various places as being some of the daftest from that exercise, though Stoke Bruerne was a close competitor, if only because of the costs of keeping replacing new signs as they decided to keep changing it.

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38 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

It actually means that whatever day you arrive, and at whatever time, you must leave at some point the following day.

So, do we obey C&RT's 'guidance' (definition) or, the Waterways bye-laws where it states :

 

“day” means the period between sunrise and sunset

 

They really don't make much effort to be consistent do they ?

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

So, do we obey C&RT's 'guidance' (definition) or, the Waterways bye-laws where it states :

 

“day” means the period between sunrise and sunset

 

 

 

 

 

On which day??

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15 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

So, do we obey C&RT's 'guidance' (definition) or, the Waterways bye-laws where it states :

 

“day” means the period between sunrise and sunset

 

They really don't make much effort to be consistent do they ?

 

 

 

 

Seems like they want boats moored during daylight hours and travelling in darkness.

 

I'm surprised they haven't realised how much money they could make by charging the vast majority of boats who moor overnight!

 

 

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16 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

Actually I know, because I was directly involved in many meetings with CRT where this was repeatedly discussed.

 

It actually means that whatever day you arrive, and at whatever time, you must leave at some point the following day.

It would be far less ambiguous if the signs said "1 night" rather than "1 day", but those of us who argued the point to try and avoid the ambiguity sadly lost.

 

This seems to be confirmed by a different version of the map I linked to earlier -

 

https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/refresh/media/original/25505-foxton-locks-visitor-mooring-map.pdf

 

Quote from a panel not shown on the First version of the map I linked to.

"Recorded stay time is measured by the number of nights between the First and latest sighting. A boat recorded at any time on two consecutive days will be treated as having stayed for one whole day and a single sighting of a boat on one day only will also be recorded as a one day visit"

 

Agreed, Alan. Saying "nights" instead of "days" makes more sense to me.

  • Greenie 1

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22 minutes ago, waterdog said:

This seems to be confirmed by a different version of the map I linked to earlier -

 

https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/refresh/media/original/25505-foxton-locks-visitor-mooring-map.pdf

 

Quote from a panel not shown on the First version of the map I linked to.

"Recorded stay time is measured by the number of nights between the First and latest sighting. A boat recorded at any time on two consecutive days will be treated as having stayed for one whole day and a single sighting of a boat on one day only will also be recorded as a one day visit"

 

Agreed, Alan. Saying "nights" instead of "days" makes more sense to me.

Exactly so!

For those sites targetted by the South East Visitor Moorings exercise, (of which Foxton is one of several), there is generally back up information like this on the CRT web-site.

Initially CRT South East Waterways made this so high profile, that there were volunteer wardens walking around handing out information sheets as they recorded  you.  That of course quickly died a death as enthusiasm for Jeff Whyatt's "great plan" waned.

As far as I know, there is nothing amongst the myriad of signage now remaining that says you have to go to a web-site for detailed explanations.  How those who don't routinely access the Internet from their boat are meant to fully understand what "day" means isn't fully thought through, so most can guess, at best.

As I said, I should better have said "1 night" than "1 day", but that would have been possible to have understood without a need to visit a web-site, so we couldn't have had that, could we?

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16 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

So, do we obey C&RT's 'guidance' (definition) or, the Waterways bye-laws where it states :

 

“day” means the period between sunrise and sunset

 

They really don't make much effort to be consistent do they ?

 

 

 

 

 

I'd say what the sign really means is "Don't take the p!ss and stay here for days on end", given that the boat checkers are unlikely to be recording the time of day a boat on that mooring actually tied up. 

 

 

 

 

  • Greenie 1

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