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Head Ruling The Heart


Parahandy
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1 hour ago, WotEver said:

:D

 

 


Ah yes, that’s the one that came down the mega-leaky Crofton flight the other evening paired up with lovely pretty tug “Finch”, lazily and arrogantly leaving every pair of bottom gates wide open.
 

Historics really do themselves no favours sometimes, do they?

 

 

:banghead:

 

 

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
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On 01/10/2019 at 11:35, noddyboater said:

It’s like a solid fuel stove in a way isn’t it, and I believe you’re a fan(don’t start that again!) of those. There’s more modern if not efficient ways of heating a boat, but for a bit of faff it’s worth it. I don’t think the old engine thing is anything to do with being a hobby or livaboard boater, you need to be an enthusiast of old engines. I wouldn’t wish my Gardner on someone who hasn’t got a clue how the oily bits work, because they wouldn’t thank me. I however can’t handle the idea of a traditional boat with all the trimmings buzzing down the cut like a suitcase generator.

Well my Friend John with the Kelvin left yesterday but not before affixing his contact details to the front of my boat whilst I was away on business . I must admit that strangely I was almost glad to see him go  , not for any other reason than that I am very busy and exchanging Boats is something I could do without thinking about . My main reasons for not taking him up on his offer is the deeper draught and the almost constant use of a Generator , I simply couldn't face it as it would just be to inconvenient especially as a Bridgehopper . This Traditional Boat aspect is a bit of a nonsense is it not ? What we commonly now know as a Tug has almost zero connection with the world of Traditional Boats , in fact few if any Carrying Boats of the past would have been fitted with a Kelvin engine so what youre talking about Noddy is simply aesthetics . A bit like those Brass Polishing Buffers I encounter from time to time ?

  • Greenie 2
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1 hour ago, Parahandy said:

This Traditional Boat aspect is a bit of a nonsense is it not ? What we commonly now know as a Tug has almost zero connection with the world of Traditional Boats , in fact few if any Carrying Boats of the past would have been fitted with a Kelvin engine so what youre talking about Noddy is simply aesthetics . A bit like those Brass Polishing Buffers I encounter from time to time ?

You’re right, it is all about aesthetics. The sound of an old engine and the way a heavy deep draughted boat handles is all part of the whole package. Try it before dismissing it, it’s the only way to make your mind up.

I’d agree that a lot of “tug style” boats have very little resemblance to a real one, mine is however pretty close, being a measured replica by arguably the best builder at the time. Yes it has some creature comforts but the main layout is the same including a 9’ central engine room. 

I’ve also never heard of a Kelvin being fitted to a working narrowboat, but I’m sure if there was one lying around in a Birmingham yard when a tug was being re-engined it would. I’d guess looking at what got fitted at the time reliability and power were the main criteria, not whether it was an inland marine engine.

 I’ll admit to occasional brass buffing but I’m not a real Concrete Head ( I slow down passed moored boats, talk to people at the lockside, talk to people in the pub even if they have a springer, use a windlass that actually fits rather than a rusty relic found in the bilges.. etc etc)

  • Greenie 3
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  • 3 months later...

63ft is a neither nor size. Too big for many of the Northern waterways but not using all the available length darn sarf.

 

As for a K3, it will need frequent river work  or a regular decoke.  It will probably also shake the tiles off the bathroom if you wind it up .  Lovely engine though. K or L bits are much easier to find than J parts.  Neither are simple, but I have not found I needed many in 30 Years with a J2.   Probably famous last words!

 

N

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8 minutes ago, BEngo said:

63ft is a neither nor size. Too big for many of the Northern waterways but not using all the available length darn sarf.

 

As for a K3, it will need frequent river work  or a regular decoke.  It will probably also shake the tiles off the bathroom if you wind it up .  Lovely engine though. K or L bits are much easier to find than J parts.  Neither are simple, but I have not found I needed many in 30 Years with a J2.   Probably famous last words!

 

N

For a liveaboard it will mean constant use of a Generator and as you can see from the Photos its a bugger to moor on the GU South .

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5 hours ago, Parahandy said:

https://narrowboats.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/coulter-63-tug/629416

 

Resurrecting an old Thread but just browsing the Duck and here for Sale is the very Boat in the OP , Pricewise big money being asked but good luck to the Seller , I won't be investing so I am out ?

Get a long polishing stick and you can polish the engine whilst sitting on the throne - bliss. :D

 

Kelvin K3

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4 hours ago, Parahandy said:

For a liveaboard it will mean constant use of a Generator and as you can see from the Photos its a bugger to moor on the GU South .

And probably more comfortable liveaboard space in a 38 foot springer!!

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On 25/01/2020 at 15:20, Parahandy said:

https://narrowboats.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/coulter-63-tug/629416

 

Resurrecting an old Thread but just browsing the Duck and here for Sale is the very Boat in the OP , Pricewise big money being asked but good luck to the Seller , I wont be investing so I am out ?

I can see why you declined his offer now. 

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Years ago we had the use of a CTS 70' with an Ailsa Craig RF4 lump in the middle.   Far and away too big to be sensible, impossible for spares.

A lovely free swimming boat, did 2mph as soon it was in gear at tickover, cruised at 180 RPM and was a nightmare to use at times. 

Could never run it hard enough to clear the carbon, threw red hot carbon clinkers into your face all day.

Eventually on the Bridgewater it started to knock, due to carbon build up. Ended up being towed back to its mooring for repair.

Accommodation wise climbing around the flywheel to get through the boat was difficult, impossible when underway.

Convinced me that as a live aboard I needed an engine under the floor not sat where the bedroom should be.

  • Happy 1
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I had a RF2 once. B****** to start, We didn't like each other very much. Swapped if for a BMC 1.5. Sheer bliss. Started every time, only needed two spanners in the toolkit, the 1970's version of the Beta.

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I could live with the Kelvin, I’ve got a Gardner that’s too big for canals but great on rivers which is where  a lot of my boating is done. I quite like the display of burning carbon from the tall pipe on a winters evening!

The fitout is ok too, but I could never live with that steelwork. I bet it doesn’t swim half as well as your CTS shell did. 

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