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Bob692

Go Kart and Wheel Barrow wheels as mooring fenders

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Barrow wheels are handy on the Shroppie or where there's an underwater shelf. Go cart tyres are useful for all sorts of anti-bump activities. 

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7 minutes ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Barrow wheels are handy on the Shroppie or where there's an underwater shelf. Go cart tyres are useful for all sorts of anti-bump activities. 

Agree. I use both for different occasions. Cheap to buy and long lasting.

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I use go-kart tyres as fenders, they work really well.  All I had to do was put a hole through it, thread some rope through and tie a knot. Sorted!

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1 minute ago, RichM said:

I use go-kart tyres as fenders, they work really well.  All I had to do was put a hole through it, thread some rope through and tie a knot. Sorted!

We also put a hole in the bottom of them to let the water out.

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Go kart tyres will sink, which can be useful. However they are useless for the shopping shelf as they too easily go over or under the shelf. Wheelbarrow wheels are best for this on 90%+ of Shroppie/Llangollen moorings.

 Knowing where to moor is also useful, as the shelf is very variable in width, and on a simple visitor mooring there may be a couple of parts where fenders are fine, but the rest of the VM needs wheels.

 For piling or other flat edges, I use rope fenders with handrail hooks with adjustable length rope.

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2 minutes ago, dor said:

Go kart tyres will sink, which can be useful. However they are useless for the shopping shelf as they too easily go over or under the shelf. Wheelbarrow wheels are best for this on 90%+ of Shroppie/Llangollen moorings.

 Knowing where to moor is also useful, as the shelf is very variable in width, and on a simple visitor mooring there may be a couple of parts where fenders are fine, but the rest of the VM needs wheels.

 For piling or other flat edges, I use rope fenders with handrail hooks with adjustable length rope.

Yup. 

When moored at Audlem we needed a wheelbarrow wheel at the stern and nothing at the bow, since the shelf tapered away to nothing.
 

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20 minutes ago, Bob692 said:

Wheel barrow wheels. Pneumatic or solid?

Mine are pneumatic. Never needed to inflate them in two years. The ducklings like them too.

 

 

 

DSCF3930.JPG

Edited by Guest

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Just now, Arthur Marshall said:

The crucial thing is to remember to take the go-cart off first. Or, in fact, the wheelbarrow. 

 

 

And then your go-cart or wheelborrow will have no wheels. 

 

Some wheels and tyres could possibly be fashioned out of canal boat fenders, by people who like using the wrong thing for a task. 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

And then your go-cart or wheelborrow will have no wheels. 

 

Some wheels and tyres could possibly be fashioned out of canal boat fenders, by people who like using the wrong thing for a task. 

 

 

 

I wouldn't borrow one without a wheel.

54 minutes ago, catweasel said:

Mine are pneumatic. Never needed to inflate them in two years. The ducklings like them too.

 

 

 

DSCF3930.JPG

You cruel bugger. You use likkle baby ducklings as fenders!

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13 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Why not use the product designed and manufactured specifically for the job?

 

What's that, then?

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54 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Why not use the product designed and manufactured specifically for the job?

Where is the fun in that? ;)

41 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

 

What's that, then?

Just thinking that. What is the product that I can buy to keep my boat of the dreaded Shroppie shelf? Can be 300mm or more in places.

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13 minutes ago, catweasel said:

Where is the fun in that? ;)

Just thinking that. What is the product that I can buy to keep my boat of the dreaded Shroppie shelf? Can be 300mm or more in places.

 

I was responding to the OP, whose post said nothing about wanting to meet the unique requirements of the shroppie shelf.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I was responding to the OP, whose post said nothing about wanting to meet the unique requirements of the shroppie shelf.

 

 

Perfectly true. However the thread moved on to describe how such devices were versatile, cheap (sometimes even free in my experience) and useful in such instances. I use mine all winter in the winter moorings to keep the neighbouring boat off mine. Wouldn't be without 'em :)

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I used to collect as many go-cart tyres as I wanted from my local track - they were more than happy to give them away as they had to pay to get rid of them!

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Another place where I have deployed wheelbarrow wheels regularly is that of the Leeds and Liverpool canal,where the curved stone underwater section tends to catch on the edge of the baseplate. 

5 minutes ago, Mike Tee said:

I used to collect as many go-cart tyres as I wanted from my local track - they were more than happy to give them away as they had to pay to get rid of them!

Yes same here. Gives them another use in life before going to landfill which must be good. 
 

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40 minutes ago, catweasel said:

Another place where I have deployed wheelbarrow wheels regularly is that of the Leeds and Liverpool canal,where the curved stone underwater section tends to catch on the edge of the baseplate. 


 

Actually my solution to this uses a length of rope bought from Lidl years ago which sinks like a stone when wet.  Looped from front to back it sinks past the baseplate and acts as a fender (or rather two fenders) between the baseplate and the underwater shelf. Works well unless the shelf is very uneven.

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1 hour ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I was responding to the OP, whose post said nothing about wanting to meet the unique requirements of the shroppie shelf.

 

 

The use of wheelbarrow wheels, and karting tyres for that matter, are far from unique to the Shroppie system.

 

 Still smarting from not finding the pipe fender wrapped round your prop Mike?

 In fairness, pipe fenders are the invention of the devil; watching people going into Hurleston bottom lock with pipe fenders down is always entertaining.

 

 Can anyone explain the benefit of cruising with fenders dragging in the water?

 

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1 minute ago, dor said:

Can anyone explain the benefit of cruising with fenders dragging in the water?

 

It helps the rest of us identify what sort of boater they are at a distance ...

  • Greenie 1

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22 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

Actually my solution to this uses a length of rope bought from Lidl years ago which sinks like a stone when wet.  Looped from front to back it sinks past the baseplate and acts as a fender (or rather two fenders) between the baseplate and the underwater shelf. Works well unless the shelf is very uneven.

Fair idea. Another solution to a problem. 

16 minutes ago, dor said:

The use of wheelbarrow wheels, and karting tyres for that matter, are far from unique to the Shroppie system.

 

 Still smarting from not finding the pipe fender wrapped round your prop Mike?

 In fairness, pipe fenders are the invention of the devil; watching people going into Hurleston bottom lock with pipe fenders down is always entertaining.

 

 Can anyone explain the benefit of cruising with fenders dragging in the water?

 

I hate pipe fenders. About as much use as an ashtray on a motorbike.

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I tried go kart tyres about 10 years ago when I had access to Brunel University's go kart club offcasts, but I found that they compressed far too easily to really be of much use as boat fenders.

 

Better to double up on ordinary car tyres if you need something extra wide.

Edited by blackrose

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