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Morso squirrel stove chimney

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Getting stove ready for winter, all swept, and baffle put back in without rebreaking the cemented bricks from last year. I moved the Eco fan, which has been in front of stove chimney since March, I notice directly behind it, the stove chimney has rusted. This has only happened since the fire was shut down. The stove and chimney is as old as boat and never had this before (10 years) 

cant see we have done anything different to cause this'sudden rusting.

Anyway, what is best solution? Rub it down, apply fertan rust remover and paint with stove paint is my thinking , but is this the right way to go about it ?w

The rust is only where the Eco fan was hiding it, although it wasn't touching the chimney , round the back and sides is fine.

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Are you sure you haven't got a leak somewhere? (or maybe someone was over enthusiastic watering the plant)

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If you are lucky it’s just surface rust, clean off and repaint, but it does look to me that water has pooled on top of the stove adaptor inside the flue, hence the even line above the stove, in which case it will have rusted from the inside to the outside.

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2 hours ago, rusty69 said:

Are you sure you haven't got a leak somewhere? (or maybe someone was over enthusiastic watering the plant)

The plants plastic, so no water there.

 

2 hours ago, Chewbacka said:

If you are lucky it’s just surface rust, clean off and repaint, but it does look to me that water has pooled on top of the stove adaptor inside the flue, hence the even line above the stove, in which case it will have rusted from the inside to the outside.

Gulp, hope not. I do usually cap the top , no water below noticeable, could be a big job then. Do I paint it with stove paint.?

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If it's rusted from the inside out it will be very thin in the area, and would collapse if you hit it with a hammer. If it's surface rust, it wont collapse if you hit it with a hammer.

 

I've just given my flue a bit of a hammering..... a firm tap is probably a fair description. If I had done that with the previous flue, which had rusted through near the ceiling, it would have collapsed.

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The fan wasn't touching the chimney so , they weren't reacting, I haven't hit it with a hammer, but it does just seem to be on outside, seems still robust. Thanks for answers, I will rub it down and paint with stove paint.

as an aside, there is also a crack in stove door glass, it hasn't cracked so much that it has a crack on inner or outer surface, you can't feel it, but there is a crack within the glass of a couple of inches, should I replace, or will it be ok if it doesn't  crack to the outside surface. ?

 

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Better to replace, last thing that you want, is for it to break on a cold Saturday night, leaving you without any heating,

 

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Perhaps I'm opening a door we shouldn't go through here but:

 

Is the glass so critical?  in the sense that it needs replacing urgently if it cracks, or even breaks completely, leaving an open fire. I ask because I grew up in houses with open coal fires, and nobody batted an eyelid that they were open. The draught sucked the smoke up the chimney, just like it does up the flue on a boat.

 

having said that, if my glass cracked, I'd be ordering a new one and replacing it without too much delay.

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4 hours ago, Richard10002 said:

Perhaps I'm opening a door we shouldn't go through here but:

 

Is the glass so critical?  in the sense that it needs replacing urgently if it cracks, or even breaks completely, leaving an open fire. I ask because I grew up in houses with open coal fires, and nobody batted an eyelid that they were open. The draught sucked the smoke up the chimney, just like it does up the flue on a boat.

 

having said that, if my glass cracked, I'd be ordering a new one and replacing it without too much delay.

Way back in the past when you were a lad, there were no carbon monoxide alarms. House rooms have a far greater area volume than a boat cabin, and the houses were drafty. Why do you think that boats have air vents and not houses.

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5 hours ago, nbfiresprite said:

Way back in the past when you were a lad, there were no carbon monoxide alarms. House rooms have a far greater area volume than a boat cabin, and the houses were drafty. Why do you think that boats have air vents and not houses.

So the reason we have the glass, (or, more correctly, the stove is completely enclosed), is to prevent carbon monoxide getting into the boat space - therefore it is pretty critical, from a safety point of view, and should be replaced immediately if cracked or broken?

 

Not wishing to be pedantic, but I think most have, or should have, some kind of air vent system, although I think it is generally more to do with damp rather than CO.

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Well CO should only be prevalent if you have poor ventilation so an open fire just like your gas cooker is safe so long as the space has sufficient ventilation. The same applies to any house stove or fire. There are strict regulations about such things. As for the olden days, the houses were so drafty, they likely had sufficient ventilation so they got away with it. In a modern house with tight windows and doors good ventilation is a must

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The flue on a house is around 7 or 8 metres long. The flue on a boat struggles to get to 2 metres, shorter thsn the manufacturers recommend. Hence there is less draft in a boat and thus more chance of CO leaking into the boat.

 

Couple this with the much smaller room volume, as nbfiresprite has pointed out and the risk of CO poisoning is much greater on a boat.

 

Best replace the glass ASAP, it isn't usually a difficult job.

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Another reason stoves are sealed, with only adjustable air vents to let the air in is to make the stove adjustable. It can allow the stove to be throttled back by restricting the air supply, reducing the fuel consumption and allowing it to stay in overnight. This increases the amount of CO produced, so it mustn't be allowed to leak out anywhere. 

 

Jen

  • Greenie 2

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Cracked glass won't make any difference to how your stove burns, your stove has a two inch hole above the glass and CO doesn't come out of that does it ? The tiny leak from the crack will suck in air as the stove is negative pressure inside, whatever extra air it leaks in will be adjusted for by the air controls. 

 

The only safety issue is if the glass is broken parts of it could fall out, the Squirrel glass is held in by a clip at each corner.

 

If you take the glass to a glass supplier they will cut you a piece of high temperature glass while you wait for about £7.  

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1 hour ago, CompairHolman said:

Cracked glass won't make any difference to how your stove burns, your stove has a two inch hole above the glass and CO doesn't come out of that does it ? The tiny leak from the crack will suck in air as the stove is negative pressure inside, whatever extra air it leaks in will be adjusted for by the air controls. 

 

The only safety issue is if the glass is broken parts of it could fall out, the Squirrel glass is held in by a clip at each corner.

 

If you take the glass to a glass supplier they will cut you a piece of high temperature glass while you wait for about £7.  

 

There is another safety issue associated with cracked glass, if as you say it falls out, and that is the additional air supply through the broken glass can cause the fire to run away.

 

If this happens during the night, when the stove has been banked up to stay in all night, and is thus unattended, it could very easily set fire to the boat.

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15 hours ago, Richard10002 said:

Perhaps I'm opening a door we shouldn't go through here but:

 

Is the glass so critical?  in the sense that it needs replacing urgently if it cracks, or even breaks completely, leaving an open fire. I ask because I grew up in houses with open coal fires, and nobody batted an eyelid that they were open. The draught sucked the smoke up the chimney, just like it does up the flue on a boat.

 

having said that, if my glass cracked, I'd be ordering a new one and replacing it without too much delay.

After a mid winter glass break and the subsequent cold couple of days, I now carry a whole replacement door, I bought second hand.

Obviously there's a limit to the spares it's possible to carry but a door is easy and I've replaced the steel flue with stainless after another mid winter fail, so that's covered :)

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At a minimum I make sure I have a spare door glass and some door seals on the boat during the winter. They do just break at seemingly random and for no obvious reason, so it's good to be able to replace it at once, rather than shiver for a couple of days waiting for a delivery.

@tree monkey 's spare door is even better, but I refuse to tie up money in an entire, very expensive Squirrel door!

 

Jen

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Just now, Jen-in-Wellies said:

At a minimum I make sure I have a spare door glass and some door seals on the boat during the winter. They do just break at seemingly random and for no obvious reason, so it's good to be able to replace it at once, rather than shiver for a couple of days waiting for a delivery.

@tree monkey 's spare door is even better, but I refuse to tie up money in an entire, very expensive Squirrel door!

 

Jen

At one point I had 2, first bought for £30 second hand, 2nd taken from the old stove when I fitted a new one.

I did give one away to someone who had a mid winter glass crisis.

 

I've done similar for BSPs boatmans, when a neighbour was replacing his I stripped the stove of bits and sent the door off for a repaint and refurbish

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During the summer I wouldn't cap the chimney off with an unvented cap as there will be no through ventilation to keep the stove internals and flue pipe from possible rusting.  Best to just use a Coolie hat and leave the stoves main door or ash pan door ajar.  Plenty of old Morso doors kicking about, about the best bit of a Morso stove in my opinion.  .Bodies usually all cracked, rusted through and opened up like Tulips at the seams so useless.

  • Happy 1

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If you replace the glass holding clips screws with stainless steel ones from the start they will never seize and you can replace the glass in a few minutes with just a screwdriver. 

  • Happy 1

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I have ordered a new glass, a bit under £30 off e bay. Thanks for replies. I think stove flue, has rusted from condensation inside boat, all fertanned now, so hopefully sorted once I buy some stove paint.

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18 hours ago, CompairHolman said:

 

If you take the glass to a glass supplier they will cut you a piece of high temperature glass while you wait for about £7.  

Ooh, I was unaware of this - it represents a huge saving over ordering from the manufacturer in my case. I'll give it a go. Might have to be next summer now though! :D

 

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