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nicknorman

Single handers - would you do this?

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6 hours ago, sirweste said:

 

 

To call people (me) a fool because my risk perception differs to yours is narrow minded in my opinion.

My dear sir, I wouldn't dream of calling you a fool. I don't even know you.

 

However, if you insist on doing foolish things, you mustn't be disappointed if people draw their own conclusions.

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7 minutes ago, DRP said:

My dear sir, I wouldn't dream of calling you a fool. I don't even know you.

 

However, if you insist on doing foolish things, you mustn't be disappointed if people draw their own conclusions.

The perception of risk is a curious thing, everyday I used to do things a lot of people wouldn't even dream of attempting and I would see others doing stuff I wouldn't consider doing, some of them wouldn't do what I did.

No point just always consider risk acceptance is an interesting thing

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1 minute ago, tree monkey said:

The perception of risk is a curious thing, everyday I used to do things a lot of people wouldn't even dream of attempting and I would see others doing stuff I wouldn't consider doing, some of them wouldn't do what I did.

No point just always consider risk acceptance is an interesting thing

Agreed.

 

I watched 4 guys wielding chainsaws earlier today. Highly experienced, the lot of them, but not one of them wore gloves and one of them was bare chested after a while. Chainsaws scare me so I always wear full PPE when I use one, no matter how hot it gets. 

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7 hours ago, Paul C said:

My understanding of the danger of leaving the windlass on is it could hit someone in the face (or elsewhere) if they're near it and it starts spinning. However it might not even wobble off the spindle, and if it did doesn't really "fly off" anyway, due to the direction of the forces involved - so there's actually little danger if its left on but nobody around it. If someone was killed by one, then they were very unlucky. 

 

The other danger, of course, is that it pings off into the canal or lock.

 

I was at Hillmorton top lock Tuesday this week when two of the three Calcutt "Royal Navy" boats (Emma and Andrew) arrived. Both boats had several children on them and they raised the paddles at the bottom of both locks once both boats were in. One of the children then let go of the windlass which promptly span and did indeed fly off. It didn't go very far but it was far enough to hit the lad (not necessarily in the face) had he not already stepped back very quickly as it started to spin.

 

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7 minutes ago, WotEver said:

Agreed.

 

I watched 4 guys wielding chainsaws earlier today. Highly experienced, the lot of them, but not one of them wore gloves and one of them was bare chested after a while. Chainsaws scare me so I always wear full PPE when I use one, no matter how hot it gets. 

Nowadays gloves are a whitefinger protection more than an effective cut protection but the rest absolutely never use one without the proper PPE personally.

Barechested no way, that dust gets everywhere as it is.

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55 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

 

Barechested no way, that dust gets everywhere as it is.

He said Bare Chest, what did you think he said :D

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9 hours ago, DRP said:

 

Boating single handed and leaving boats unattended and moving in locks is just foolish.

I imagine even the debaters in this forum, addicted to reductio ad absurdum arguments, can probably understand that(although I wouldn't put money on it).

No it isn't, under the right circumstances. I could just as well say that riding the gate is foolish, because I think it is. Enough people disagree and do it safely. I don't, because I'm not comfortable with the lack of control.  These things are a matter of how well you know your boat, locks and what you're doing - you can rarely generalise and say something is always right or wrong (apart from the fact that pump outs are inferior to chuckits, bow thrusters are for wimps, fat boats are ugly and trombones are better than banjos). 

9 hours ago, DRP said:

 

 

9 hours ago, DRP said:

 

 

Edited by Arthur Marshall
Posted 3x for some reason.

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13 hours ago, DRP said:

My dear sir, I wouldn't dream of calling you a fool. I don't even know you.

 

However, if you insist on doing foolish things, you mustn't be disappointed if people draw their own conclusions.

Again, you seem unable to grasp the point that what you consider foolish is due to your own perception of risk. 

I personally don't like to judge people in general, certainly try my best not to anyhow. So wouldn't like to conclude on your risk perception vs mine. For example it could be said, but to be clear I am not say it: the risk of the boat hanging during the last ~10% of the lock cycle is low enough that a person would be foolish not to make use of this time to set ahead.

 

Anyhow, everyone's different, lets try not to judge aye.

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18 minutes ago, sirweste said:

the risk of the boat hanging during the last ~10% of the lock cycle is low enough that a person would be foolish not to make use of this time to set ahead.

 

 

This is certainly my view. 

 

In fact I think the biggest risk in leaving the boat during that last 10% (I'm usually happy with 15%) to set ahead, is someone nipping inside the boat and stealing your laptop.

 

 

 

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What about hydraulic paddles?  I often leave my windlass on them.  Indeed, I can think of a couple on the C&H that very slowly wind down again if left - the weight of the windlass just prevents that.  Oh, and I also leave the boat during the last part of a filling cycle to set the lock ahead.  Less likely to do this when emptying or when I don't know the lock.  Having a short boat, I also tie up to the much-maligned centre bollards, or if none, (whisper) to the ladder.

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50 minutes ago, sirweste said:

..... the risk of the boat hanging during the last ~10% of the lock cycle is low enough that a person would be foolish not to make use of this time to set ahead .....

When you are that close to being able to depart the lock I'm not convinced that there is a worthwhile time saving to be had from walking to the next lock and back again.  Not at the speed I can walk/run these days anyway.....?

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Yeah, I often leave the windlass on the paddle spindle. I don't see the ratchet suddenly failing when in a static condition being very likely at all. Dynamically when you're finishing winding yes, could slip. But once ratchet is engaged and static...

1 minute ago, malp said:

When you are that close to being able to depart the lock I'm not convinced that there is a worthwhile time saving to be had from walking to the next lock and back again.  Not at the speed I can walk/run these days anyway.....?

Yer, I run it. The last time I did it was on the Marsworth flight, was definitely beneficial. The last ~10% of lock volume is slow to fill of course, relative to the first 10%

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If you were running to the next lock........wouldn't you want to take the windlass with you, rather than leaving it at the previous?

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It seems that there were far less cillings and sinkings before the Cill markers were introduced. Perhaps because folk knew the cills were there but weren't certain of the extent of them so therefore kept their boats well forward just in case. Now they can see cill markers some tend to judge the stern of the boat too close to the them and a bit of a drift backwards can catch them.  Also messing about on mobile phones at the lockside and not paying proper attention can be very dodgy, I see this behavior a lot.

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16 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

If you're singlehanding, you are always a bit aware that you are slower (if not by much if you're any good at it) than the crewed boat behind you. So there's a bit of pressure to get on along a flight as quick as you can. Nice as people are you can see their faces drop when they realise you're on your own.

I was in this situation a number of times this summer on narrow locks and was gratified by how many times crew from boats behind me helped me work through locks.   The biggest single help and time saver is simply having them close the exit gates.  A couple of boat crews though actually went beyond the call of duty and said "stay on your boat" and worked the lock for me.   There is an element of self interest of course, or maybe they took pity on me as someone who is clearly of pensionable age,.......

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5 minutes ago, Paul C said:

If you were running to the next lock........wouldn't you want to take the windlass with you, rather than leaving it at the previous?

I've got loads, leave one on each paddle of the whole flight for maximum flying windlass damage.

 

(yes I take it with me obviously! I don't leave it on always because I need it to wind the next paddle. Key word was "often")

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15 minutes ago, Paul C said:

If you were running to the next lock........wouldn't you want to take the windlass with you, rather than leaving it at the previous?

 

I always use two windlasses when singlehanding a flight.

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If there's a family with a small child near the lock gear, I'll take two - leaving the heavy steel one with sharp edges on the spindle. Otherwise I'd normally just take one - an aluminium light windlass.

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The cheap pressed metal windlass that is now popular with hire/share boats is very prone to flying off the spindle in the event of an uncontrolled run down due to it having no taper to match the spindle hence a lousy fit. They are also cutting grooves in the spindles.

 

I make my windlasses with the proper taper on all sockets, they are two length windlasses, and they fit so well that they often have to be jarred off the spindle.

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2 minutes ago, Boater Sam said:

The cheap pressed metal windlass that is now popular with hire/share boats is very prone to flying off the spindle in the event of an uncontrolled run down due to it having no taper to match the spindle hence a lousy fit. They are also cutting grooves in the spindles.

 

I make my windlasses with the proper taper on all sockets, they are two length windlasses, and they fit so well that they often have to be jarred off the spindle.

 

OK

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If I didnt tie up the boat in one of our locks on the S&SY I would never get back on!! 20 odd foot wide and 250 foot longish makes for a a lock the size of a small lake!!

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8 hours ago, bizzard said:

It seems that there were far less cillings and sinkings before the Cill markers were introduced. Perhaps because folk knew the cills were there but weren't certain of the extent of them so therefore kept their boats well forward just in case. Now they can see cill markers some tend to judge the stern of the boat too close to the them and a bit of a drift backwards can catch them.  Also messing about on mobile phones at the lockside and not paying proper attention can be very dodgy, I see this behavior a lot.

After a couple of weeks with our 60ft nb on the Rochdale, Calder and Hebble and Leeds and Liverpool, watching the cill (and the gates at the front as well) is a constant necessity!

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On 29/08/2019 at 01:20, Chris Williams said:

Surely he is free to swim away.  My dog was seldom on the boat, unless we were tied up.  That's why she hated rivers - no towpath.

My beloved pooch is quite old and doesn't swim well. Due to age, he's confined to the inside of the boat when cruising.

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On 29/08/2019 at 23:35, Mad Harold said:

 

To empty a pub quickly,both the Trombone and the Banjo are just as good.

A gentleman is someone who knows how to play a trombone 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But doesn't. 

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